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View Full Version : Can't take my knitting on the plane .. UPDATE!, I CAN!!


tarrentella
06-25-2008, 07:41 AM
:waah: wahhhhh. I have a flight coming up in two weeks to Japan. It as well as the loooong flights themselves i have an 8 hour transfer in Columbo and a 4 hour transfer in London. Iget a domestic flight from Newcastle to London then an international flight from Londond to Tokyo (via Columbo). The international flight allows knitting needles. the 1 hour domestic flight doesn't.
Becasue of the one hour domestic flight, i will have to put my needles in my check in baggage which i wont see for another 24 hours until i arrive in Tokyo. :waah: NOT FAIR NOT FAIR NOT FAIR (i am now imagining stoming around the room wearing big boots and sulking).

now what am i going to do to stop me going crazy with boredom!!

Mulderknitter
06-25-2008, 08:14 AM
get yourself a portable dvd player or download books onto an ipod. sorry!:pout:

becjo
06-25-2008, 08:24 AM
WHY? Do you know what it is they wont allow? The needles? Any kind of needles? From past experience - I've just put my knitting my purse that goes through the scanner & no one says anything. I would take cheap needles that you can give to them if they say anything & put the knitting on a holder - but darn it! I'd check that out again. I thought everything was OK now to take - even at the high security - weren't bamboo needles safe to take? I feel for you - maybe a good time to take some knitting books & magazines & figure out your next pattern?

Dimpledapple
06-25-2008, 08:32 AM
Oh, I'm sorry about that :sad: Maybe if you strategically place some small plastic or wooden needles in the middle of your carry-on items?:whistle:

SBG
06-25-2008, 09:59 AM
Oh, I'm sorry about that :sad: Maybe if you strategically place some small plastic or wooden needles in the middle of your carry-on items?:whistle:

That's what I'd do. Resist the urge to knit on the domestic flight but then you'll have them handy for the international one.

catcook
06-25-2008, 10:13 AM
I think thats what I would do also. What about plastic needles, that wouldn't show up in any xray. If nothing else how about a good mystery! >^,,^<

CountryKitty
06-25-2008, 10:15 AM
If it were me, I'd take one of my cheap plastic circular needles (plastic needles as well as cable), stick it in my carry on luggage, and of course since plastic won't show on X-ray, carry it right on. I doubt if the stewardesses would say anything about a woman quietly knitting and not pestering them every 5 minutes for some silly thing or another. Especially since the short plastic needle portions aren't feasible weapons.

But that's just me....and I play dumb blond pretty well (not permitted? Really? I had no clue!):thumbsup:

SBG
06-25-2008, 10:52 AM
I'm a brunette, but I can play dumb with the best of 'em!

becjo
06-25-2008, 01:35 PM
We're a bunch of knitting rebels!!!!!

cftwo
06-25-2008, 03:29 PM
Didn't I learn here that British Airways is picky about these things? I'd be tempted to learn to crochet on the flight, since I haven't heard anything about no crochet hooks.

Jan in CA
06-25-2008, 03:36 PM
Can you take some yarn and a couple pencils and play with that? Or are pencils not allowed?

I've never actually tried knitting with pencils, but it seems like fun to try. :teehee:

evona
06-25-2008, 04:13 PM
I was just going to say that Jan - I remember reading another thread here that talked about the "No Knitting Needles" rule some airlines enforce. The pencil or pen trick was mentioned there. Someone also mentioned putting their hair up with chopstick hair accessories and then just using those to knit with on the flight.

Constance123
06-25-2008, 04:14 PM
Oh I am so sorry. I have to say that since 911 I have had scissors (blunt ended) and needles confiscated. I did have one altercation in Gatwick customs coming home, and I won. Took a while, but I always check in early. I now do just as the others have said, I sink a pair of plastic rounds into my carry on. I have even put them in my bra (treat them like an underwire and they don't x ray or beep. I just can't be on a plane for 14 hours (9 has been my limit) without my knitting. Actually I was sitting up knitting and talking to a bored attendent. You must try and get those needles through that 1 hour domestic, or take a lot of crossword. If you have cheap needles, what's the worst that can happen??? Just toss them and look innocent. Good luck!!!!! Put the plastic's inside the skein of yarn.

Knitters must unite. I want to know.....do women who knit look like a threat?????
Love and Good Luck
Constance

evona
06-25-2008, 04:16 PM
I just thought of another idea . . . considering that you have a 4 hour delay in London, would it be possible there is a Chinese restaurant in the airport? Perhaps you can have lunch at one and take an extra set of their chopsticks to knit on the longer international flights. Kinda rough needles, but desperate times take desperate measures. :wink: Maybe you can use an emery board to soften up the wood a bit.

Jan in CA
06-25-2008, 09:59 PM
Frankly I don't think the risk is worth it to try and hide needles either on yourself or your carry on, but then I'm a rule follower. I would think if you did get caught it would look worse than if you admittedly had them. I think either putting your hair up with chopsticks and/or taking along a couple pencils, some yarn and a puzzle book is the safest bet. If all else fails you can do puzzles. :teehee:

Crycket
06-26-2008, 12:10 AM
I thought the denise set was allowed anywhere...is that true?

Pencils would be ok...best to try white pencil crayons though...they wouldn't be so likely to mark up your stuff! and all pencil crayons have that round edge....you know...the kind that roll off your desk at school!

MaleKnitter
06-26-2008, 12:40 AM
yes, plastic needles would be good. I would opt for bamboo ones. I think, as long as they are not evil-metal-stabby-thingies then they are allowed.
I would also go for a circular needle rather than a single pointed needle (the actual needle part is about 5 inches so it is much less likely to be used as a weapon)
Don't try to do any fancy Secret agent stuff, like hiding it in your hair... (ooh, but that could work, if you tie a bun with the cable and then stick the ends out, no one would know... but that's beside the point) or in your bra.
just stick it in your purse (or keep your current WIP on it in your carry-on luggage). It's not some evil doomsday device (in fact, quite the opposite) it is just a circular knitting needle.
I am sure YARN is allowed... right? Yes, just put a non-metal circular needle in your purse. Simple, they won't stop you.

I believe that we should change the laws to conform to knitters. Since (as we all know) knitters are the nicest people in the world, they couldn't POSSIBLY harm anyone.

Ooh, and DONT knit with pencils. THAT is awful. I have been desperate enough to knit that I tried using pencils (I was on a bus trip and someone had some yarn, but no needles) and soon decided that I would just have to wait. Pencil-knitting-needles are no fun and they take the pleasure out of knitting.

tarrentella
06-26-2008, 05:01 AM
Didn't I learn here that British Airways is picky about these things? I'd be tempted to learn to crochet on the flight, since I haven't heard anything about no crochet hooks.
No it actually says 'no knitting needles or crochet hooks'. I couldnt believe it! you are allowed to take on nail scisors, nail files, fountain pens (with replacemt nib) and some some items of cutlery but not knitting needles or crochet needles.
I have a metal glasses case which is just the right length for some options tips, do you think i mihgt be able to hide them in there? am i just being cheeky?

susi
06-26-2008, 05:30 AM
goodness i wouldnt risk hiding needles either. especially in london, they could even refuse to let you fly!! to me thats not worth it.

i'd buy some bomboo or non metal needles and speak to them face to face when you get there. usually they are pretty good at understanding that you simply wont to knit not do something awful.

i havent flown for years, before i started knitting so havent tried it yet. i will be flying this year at some point (from london) so it will be interesting to know if they do allow it.

they may allow plastics over anythign else as i know mine bend like crazy and simply snap. prehaps even take a spare needle and show them how flimsy they actually are.

alternativly a good book is always a great idea

kinda crappy though if they wont allow it, the saftey measures they are taking is great, but they dont infgorse half of the things that they should and the other half they actually do do is silly stuff like knitting needles!!

good luck finiding a solution

susi

Mike
06-26-2008, 07:39 AM
I wouldn't speak to them if they list them and you want to try.
If they find them play dumb and let them take them.

I'd either get some plastic or bamboo and put them in your bag and don't pull them out until you're on the flight that allows them or find a LYS in London that you can get to during your layover.
Or if you can get a PO box or know someone in London you could mail yourself a pair and have them waiting.

I don't think it's so wrong to ban knitting needles, but anyone who can use one as an effective weapon can use just about anything else too.

tarrentella
06-26-2008, 08:50 AM
I can see the logic of banning needles, they are after all, pointy sticks. But If somebody wants to create a weapon there are many things which are aloud on a plane that can be equally if not more viscious than a knitting needle (for example the knitter you are trying to take them off of!). If somebody is getting on a plane specifically to cause trauble, then I assume they will be carrying what ever items they feel they need with them in some form, but a lot of the precautions in place are for other passangers who unexpectadly get violant (after a delayed flight and a couple of drinks people realy can get nasty) and it is those people who are more likely to grab hold of whatever is too hand and use it as a weapon. Unfortunately that could easily by my (or your) knitting needles!
It would be silly to risk a whole flight for the needles but it still seems soft that they ban some things and not others. That is what irks me, and also that one airliner bans them whilst another doesn't and the airports get stuck in the middle trying to impose thier own rules plus the rules of the dozens of carriers using their facilities.

I think i will have to try and find some plastic needles. Can anybody recomend any plastic circulars? I can never seem to tell the difference between plastic and plastic coated.

Mirl56
06-26-2008, 08:58 AM
How about finger knitting - they can't confiscate them!! LOL :wink:

http://www.knitty.com/issuesummer06/FEATfingerknitting.html
http://www.wikihow.com/Finger-Knit
http://www.kidscanmakeit.com/AC0023.htm

kellyh57
06-26-2008, 10:20 AM
Can you take them until the other flight and then check them in another bag? Some countries make you get all your luggage off anyway so you could just throw them in the checked baggage during that point and then get them out when you get to the next place. Have you checked into that option?

Kelly

figaro
06-26-2008, 11:23 AM
As I am reading this, I started to wonder, you have a hour domestic flight then the long international flight right? What if you talked to the flight attendants before hand to clarify the rule with them, explain that after this flight you are on a long international flight that allows needles then asked them if it would be ok if the attendants would hold your needles (in a ziplock bag) during your domestic flight then gave them to you at the end? No, you would not be able to knit during the 1 hour flight but it is one hour, very short and you would be able to knit for the longer flight?

Am I explaining myself right? I hope so, I think this might work.

psquidy
06-26-2008, 11:25 AM
That really sucks. You can't even bring bamboo ones? Maybe you could hide them in your hair and no one would notice.

Arielluria
06-26-2008, 11:25 AM
Take 2 ballpointpens, or any such pointy thing, some yarn and go at it!!!!!!!!!!!! They won't that THAT away from you!:teehee:

heykaren
06-26-2008, 11:28 AM
I flew in April with plastic straights and had NO problem at all. I was debating bringing my options taken apart, but was afraid to loose a set if they decided to take them.

I think the speaking to the flight attendant and giving them the needles for the first flight sounds like a decent option as well.

Good luck and let us know what happens.

Karen

tarrentella
06-26-2008, 11:30 AM
Can you take them until the other flight and then check them in another bag? Some countries make you get all your luggage off anyway so you could just throw them in the checked baggage during that point and then get them out when you get to the next place. Have you checked into that option?

Kelly

I might get my luggage back in between the domestic flight and the lonh haul flight which of course would make things easier.
And Figaro, if i don't get a chance to delve into my checked luggage between flights then that may be a good idea if i havn't found plastic needles by then. The problem with plastic needles, is if it is a hard enough plastic it will show up in the scanner, and the rule says no needles not no metal needles, so plastics would fall under it too.

I realy don't know why i am making such a fuss, except i had picked out the perfect confned-space-keep-me-occupied project and now my plans have been foiled!

SqueakerDoo
06-26-2008, 11:41 AM
http://www.tsa.gov/travelers/airtravel/prohibited/permitted-prohibited-items.shtm#4


According to TSA, knitting and crochet needles are ok. Is it an airline that is making you leave the needles behind? Maybe the airline's website isn't up to date? Maybe you could call? I have 2 trips coming up as well. One is on Southwest, and their website directed me to this TSA site. I am not sure about the other airline.

Also, I just started knitting, so I haven't tried to fly yet :/ I will let you know how it goes it a couple of weeks though.

Debkcs
06-26-2008, 11:48 AM
Apparently Squeaker, it's her flight on Brittish Airways that's the problem.

I'd call them and see if that would go for plastic circular needles. Who knows, you might even get a knitter who knows what they are talking about.

Bon Voyage!

SBG
06-26-2008, 11:57 AM
I can't imagine there's a bunch of risk involved in trying to bring them. I don't memorize the rules before I fly (though I suppose I should). Gee, I can't have plastic circular knitting needles? I'm sorry, I had no idea! They take them, I board. It's not like they're going to detain someone over this. If there is a risk of being detained for such an offense, I'd be avoiding that country anyway.

Crycket
06-26-2008, 12:11 PM
It is funny...reading though all this...and thinking it is all ridiculus!

I mean...I am thinking about anything someone can do with a needle...and ok..it is really kinda like a little ice pick if you want to get technical....but circulars...aren;t they kinda like little garroting wire...*smiles*

Man....everything is a weapon...someone should call Chuck Norris!

cacunn
06-26-2008, 09:32 PM
I don't understand why one of the needle manufactures has not seen this a open market. Especially one of the companies making interchangeable cable needles. the could make a set of of needle heads to fit the existing cables. Designed for flying these plastic needles around 4 inches in length and made of a semi flexible material like the Balene needles. At most they might need a very small piece of metal in the base to thread the cable into.

Shandeh
06-26-2008, 10:31 PM
I agree with becjo.

Take lots of knitting magazines and pattern booklets. And make a list of all the things you're going to make over the next few months. Put little post-it flags on each page you want to reference. I would LOVE to have several hours to do that!

Silver
06-26-2008, 10:45 PM
Seriously, I would carry a small set of wooden circulars (size 2 and short tips) and some sock yarn in my purse, with a sock already started. The worst thing is they're going to confiscate them, but chances are they'll pass through unnoticed. Don't be nervous during the security check, and act dumb and nonchalant if they find them. Don't take them out on the 1 hour flight (this flight will go by very quickly anyway), and be happy and content on the long flight.

susi
06-27-2008, 05:26 AM
in london they dont just confiscate the item, they can kick you off the flight and arrest you. its not like america at all, there has been no relaxing hardly of the terrorist laws there. if your caught then you could be deported and fase charges. for me thats simply not worth the risk.

think i'd have the old pattern books etc out and choose new projects.

susi

Karina
06-27-2008, 07:44 AM
I think you should call the airline and explain the situation. I don't think it is worth getting caught in the airport. I don't think you would get arrested necessarily but they can take you into custody while they check every scrap of your baggage and delve into your background to see if you are a person of interest. that could take hours and you would miss your flight. They would not refund your money for your ticket if you miss it. 4 hrs is quite a long stop over, you might find something in the airport. Alternatively take a couple of balls of yarns and see what your can come up with. Try out some knotted bracelets or belts with cotton yarn and beads. lots of yarn crafts that do not require needles or hooks. I have a booklet about friendship bracelets that I got for my daughter and they can get quite elaborate and involved.

Hope you have a great time in Japan.

SBG
06-27-2008, 07:59 AM
in london they dont just confiscate the item, they can kick you off the flight and arrest you. its not like america at all, there has been no relaxing hardly of the terrorist laws there. if your caught then you could be deported and fase charges. for me thats simply not worth the risk.

think i'd have the old pattern books etc out and choose new projects.

susi

I've only flown internationally once, to Costa Rica. So pardon my ignorance. I despise flying and don't think it's worth the hassle! There are plenty of places in the US, Canada, and Mexico I can drive to for vacation! lol

Carrie218
06-27-2008, 09:19 AM
This is very weird; I have flown BA *and* brought knitting needles with me... This was as early as this last April/March and I had no problems whatsoever.

miss_molly
06-27-2008, 10:57 AM
I'm flying by Qantas from Australia to Vancouver in September. No knitting needles allowed! The frustrating thing is that a couple of weeks ago it was announced they are looking at relaxing some of the security regulations, including the taking of knitting needles on planes.

:cheering: Great, I thought, till the news item went on to say they would be spending 6 months on making the decisions (!) ... too late for me. :waah:

So what I plan to do is buy a childish looking soft pencil case, put some coloured pencils in it, erasers, AND some child's paint brushes, so it looks like a little gift for a child. It took a lot of searching to find brushes the thickness of my needles and with nicely tapered, smooth ends, but I eventually found some. I'll be knitting with paint brushes. (I must have looked ridiculous in the craft shop, measuring paint brushes with my knitting needle gauge!)

I've also bought a set of child's plastic knitting needles. They are shorter than average but long enough for my baby knitting, and they have a knob on the end with a big smiley face. They loook as cute and harmless as knitting needles could. They'll go in my bag too, and hopefully they won't be confiscated. If they are, no worries, they only cost a couple of dollars.

rachejm
06-27-2008, 11:22 AM
I like making friendship bracelets, there are loads of patterns on the internet, you could try that instead. I would probs do that or finger knitting. I'd go with the better safe than sorry approach.
I doubt you'd get arrested for having knitting needles, especially if you just hand them over if anyone does have a problem with it, you never know though, depends on the security. I've never flown so I can't really offer you an opinion on how tough security is at the moment, I would like to think that a little common sense is exercised before arresting someone for something like that.

Silver
06-27-2008, 11:37 AM
in london they dont just confiscate the item, they can kick you off the flight and arrest you. its not like america at all, there has been no relaxing hardly of the terrorist laws there. if your caught then you could be deported and fase charges. for me thats simply not worth the risk.
That is completely ridiculous. So do people have to study and take a quiz on airline rules before you can go through the security check points? I can't believe they would react that way to an honest mistake. I can see them freaking out over a pocket knife, but knitting needles? :doh:

amy
06-27-2008, 12:01 PM
No it actually says 'no knitting needles or crochet hooks'. I couldnt believe it!

Wow, I can't imagine them banning CROCHET hooks! I was going to suggest trying Denise needles, but if they're banning crochet hooks, and if their rules are as strict as they sound, sneaking something in sounds risky. I agree with 1) Calling to double check the rules, 2) bringing alternatives, and 3) hoping you can access your luggage between flights!

But hey, here's a last ditch idea...maybe you could mail yourself some needles to be waiting for you at the layover airport after that domestic flight. If the (friendlier) airline won't do it, then you can contact the airport's tourist/bus information booth for ideas. If off-site is the only option, they could tell you 1) if there is a knitting shop within reasonable distance (then you won't need to mail anything) and 2) if there are any hotels within a cheap taxi ride, or easy busride distance. Hotels are used to holding mail for folks, right? Not an easy solution, but if time allows (you do have a 4 hour layover right?), and you're desperate enough for knitting....;)

I once toured Madrid during a 10 hour layover there. :teehee: It was the highlight of my trip!

That said, if you were able to access your luggage, you could abandon your back up plan, and find the nearest airport cafe to knit in. :)

Nobones
06-28-2008, 08:51 AM
Teach yourself to Tat. It's a small shuttle, small ball of crochet cotton and a pattern. No hooks or sharp bits. I Tat on the flights to Newcastle, I hate flying so it makes it pass quick.

It could be good for to learn with the costumes you make, I use it as trim sometimes. If you fancy having a go let me know I've a few spare plastic shuttles and a really good 'How To' leaflet.

susi
06-28-2008, 09:32 AM
That is completely ridiculous. So do people have to study and take a quiz on airline rules before you can go through the security check points? I can't believe they would react that way to an honest mistake. I can see them freaking out over a pocket knife, but knitting needles? :doh:

I know its totally crazy. the english havent reallyrelaxed at all. but there was a terrorist attack not that long ago on an airport in scotland wasnt there, so never get the chance to relax about ti i guess.

i must admit i would rather they were causious, but hey are being rediculas with crochet hooks and needles. i can understand no metal wooden bamboo etc, just allow plastic once.

i dont get it either :shrug:

cacunn
06-28-2008, 08:22 PM
i must admit i would rather they were causious, but hey are being rediculas with crochet hooks and needles. i can understand no metal wooden bamboo etc, just allow plastic once.


I don't understand the inconsistency. I would agree that long single point knitting needles may be dangerous.But, double point and even more so circular needles are not that long. As I sit and type this there is a Papermate ball point ink pen on my desk. This pen is longer than the needle section of my circular needle and just shorter than the double point needles I have. If you take the cap off the tip is almost as pointy as either of my needles. I have little doubt that I could take two or three of these pens on board with me with out question, but not the knitting needles.

It is just easier to take a rule that might be good for long single point knitting needles and spread it across all knitting needles.

susi
06-29-2008, 07:29 AM
I don't understand the inconsistency. I would agree that long single point knitting needles may be dangerous.But, double point and even more so circular needles are not that long. As I sit and type this there is a Papermate ball point ink pen on my desk. This pen is longer than the needle section of my circular needle and just shorter than the double point needles I have. If you take the cap off the tip is almost as pointy as either of my needles. I have little doubt that I could take two or three of these pens on board with me with out question, but not the knitting needles.

It is just easier to take a rule that might be good for long single point knitting needles and spread it across all knitting needles.
i agree its totally rediculas no needles at all. what can you do with a crochet hook?
i know tha rules are crazy and i totally agree with everyone, i can get straight needles (metal once etc) that wont break, but plastioc and crochet circ's dpns etc its just crazy. even if they say to leave them in your purse during that flight!

i think i said before i got stopped for having a horses bit in my bags in the hold, not even in hand bags. i did have one in my hand bags as well, but not the one that could be counted as dangerous. th eone i had was rubber not metal. crazy crazy crazy :??

hummingbird
06-29-2008, 01:32 PM
This is the kind of crap that happens when rules are made for the appearance of increased security. Not allowing knitting needles is just as dumb as not allowing water. And why do pilots have to go through security? Who really cares if they bring knives through? They already have control of the airplane and they already have an ax sitting next to them (the ax is in case it is needed to get out in a crash). So let pilots right through and make the line faster for everyone.

Knitting_Guy
06-29-2008, 01:38 PM
Put them in your checked bag and hope you can get them out before the long flight. It isn't worth the risk trying to sneak them on board. Jail could really ruin your trip.

lelvsdgs
06-30-2008, 07:37 PM
OK, so we all lament the fact that we can't always fly with our needles but they have those safeguards there for a reason. We may not know exactly why but they do. I just hope we all remember that those security folks don't make the rules, they just have to follow them. I always bring a couple of books and my iPod... Sorry that you aren't going to be able to knit and fly but I hope your trip is great!

knovice
07-01-2008, 01:29 AM
I read somewhere (maybe in one of the Yarn Harlot's books) that it's possible to make knitting needles out of *paper* that would be allowed under even the most stringent airport security guidelines. You roll up a piece of paper, pulling out a bit of the center to make a point, and brush it all over with white glue. When it dries... viola! Paper knitting needles.

tarrentella
07-01-2008, 04:35 AM
Very clever, but if you think they are strict about taking knitting needles onto the plane, you want to see what they are like about taking glue on!
I will be checking my knitting in, at least for the domestic flight, and then will hope I get a chance to take it out for the long haul, if not oh well. I actually have a lot of work to be doing on the flight so there is pleanty to keep me busy, knitting would have just been a nice break for when the studying is getting too much or my eyes are geting tired from the text.

I am going to have an hours commute from the hotel to the uni every day, so pleanty of time for knitting then (assuming knititng in public is not an etiquette faux par (sp?) in Japan).

hummingbird
07-01-2008, 12:32 PM
OK, so we all lament the fact that we can't always fly with our needles but they have those safeguards there for a reason. We may not know exactly why but they do. I just hope we all remember that those security folks don't make the rules, they just have to follow them. I always bring a couple of books and my iPod... Sorry that you aren't going to be able to knit and fly but I hope your trip is great!
_______________________________________________

lelvsdgs,
This is just what my point is about. Restrictions like not allowing knitting needles are not about increasing security. They are about increasing the appearance of security without actually increasing security. So, yeah, we know the reason. It's just a really dumb reason. It's the same thing with liquids, except for that they just want you to buy the drinks inside the airport and spend more $$$ on them. Remember that plot to sneak liquid explosives onto the plane? That was shown that it wouldn't work. Even if you want to increase the security for that why not just not allow the ingredients for the explosives? Water is not a part of that and is necessary for the health of the passengers. Even the flight crew can only bring liquids through if they are in uniform. The rules don't make any sense.

WynnieG
07-03-2008, 11:25 AM
What about a Knitters' / Crocheters' Campaign to allow certain plastic needles on all flights, anywhere? A letter writing campaign to address the issue. Tell the authorities that we respect what they're trying to do, and that we want to comply, but we want the rule applied reasonably, and uniformly - not this "you can have x here, but not here" nonsense.

How many of us belong to guilds? Maybe we could spread the word knitter to knitter, crocheter to crocheter. I mean think of it, there's millions of us fiber artists out there, we should be able to put some pressure on to get a bit of comfort on those long haul flights!

davespurl
07-03-2008, 01:00 PM
I fly several times a year in the U.S. and we are now allowed to bring knitting needles in our carryon bags. They don't care about the needles, BUT they do care about the scissors. They must be small sewing scissors or round tipped ones. I can't speak about international airlines, but I've flown to LA, Honolulu and Las Vegas so far this year and haven't had a problem. Cigarette lighters are now allowed also but you'd better get that small tube of lip gloss into a quart size bag!!!

Happy traveling!

WynnieG
07-03-2008, 03:24 PM
Ok, that officially boggles my mind! Cigarette lighters?! We're not even allowed to smoke in-flight? And how is a lighter less dangerous than lip gloss? :noway:

Totally freaking insane.

On a side note those thread wheels you can get from DMC are really good at cutting thinner yarns, like lace and fingering weight. Mine's a little tough on acrylic, but all the natural fiber yarns I've tried worked fine.

Mike
07-03-2008, 05:51 PM
Ok, that officially boggles my mind! Cigarette lighters?! We're not even allowed to smoke in-flight? And how is a lighter less dangerous than lip gloss? :noway:

Totally freaking insane.

On a side note those thread wheels you can get from DMC are really good at cutting thinner yarns, like lace and fingering weight. Mine's a little tough on acrylic, but all the natural fiber yarns I've tried worked fine.
We can't smoke either. But before lighters weren't allowed ON the plane. That made it tough to smoke on layovers or at the destination.

Lip gloss could contain explosive liquids or poisons. I think all liquids are limited in the amounts you can have (except I think they've finally made an exception for breast milk or formulas).

tarrentella
07-08-2008, 11:05 AM
I decided that it would be daft to go all 'secret agent' and try and smuggle my knitting on the plane, but i thought i would at least try and see if i could take it with me.

All i did was pop my knitting in my carry on bag, unscrewed the needle tips and put some caps on so the knitting didn't come off the needles and put the needle tips in the side pocket out of the way. no hiding or subterfuge.

I had absolutely no problems going through security for the domesticc flight, or going through security for the start of the long flight. In fact this is the first time i have flown were i havn't been stopped for somthing!:woohoo:so i will be happilly knitting away several thousand feet in the sky.

heatherg23
07-08-2008, 01:29 PM
[
All i did was pop my knitting in my carry on bag, unscrewed the needle tips and put some caps on so the knitting didn't come off the needles and put the needle tips in the side pocket out of the way. no hiding or subterfuge.]

What type of needles do you have that you can unscrew the tips? I just went out to by plastic needles because I'm suddenly going on a plane tomarrow. I get a little claustophobic so knitting will get me through it. I've never knitted on a plane since i've only been knitting 4 months.

Thanks

LovelyLinda
07-08-2008, 02:31 PM
knitpicks Options or Harmony have tips that unscrew.

tarrentella
07-08-2008, 02:40 PM
knitpicks Options or Harmony have tips that unscrew.

I have the Options. they are wonderfull for transporting projects without fear of dropping stitches.
oh the joy of wifi in airports!

LovelyLinda
07-08-2008, 02:42 PM
I have the Options. they are wonderfull for transporting projects without fear of dropping stitches.
oh the joy of wifi in airports!

I just got my Options in the mail yesterday :woot: I'm really looking forward to trying them.

The.Knitter
07-08-2008, 02:43 PM
Denise Interchangable needles twist off the cords and there are little caps to make the cord into a stitch holder. Good luck on your flight!

Karina
07-08-2008, 04:44 PM
Have fun. will make the next 24 hours go a lot faster. make sure to take some photos and post when you get back.

Jan in CA
07-09-2008, 01:12 AM
How'd you write if you're on a plane? Did I read that wrong? :??

:teehee:

cacunn
07-09-2008, 02:49 AM
Boye also has interchangeable knitting needles.

http://www.wrights.com/wrights/products/catalog/boyeline/b_images/7312.jpg

http://www.wrights.com/wrights/products/catalog/boyeline/knitmates_accs.htm

The little pink disks in the lower left of the picture go on the end of cables in place of the needles for transport or if you want to use the needle tips for another project.

MAmaDawn
07-09-2008, 07:42 AM
Glad you were able to get them on the plane... I love my Boye Needlemasters...

noratasha
07-09-2008, 03:16 PM
Didn't I learn here that British Airways is picky about these things? I'd be tempted to learn to crochet on the flight, since I haven't heard anything about no crochet hooks.

British Airways is picky about crochet hooks.....last summer I took a flight from London Gatwick to Hartsfield Jackson in Atlanta....I wanted to crochet on the 8 hour flight.....I checked into it, and they don't allow aluminum needles or hooks, but they allowed acrylic (plastic) hooks....no needles at all....which sucked if you only knit....

I'd ask the airline in question if they allow acrylic or plastic needles/hooks

tarrentella
07-10-2008, 08:13 AM
How'd you write if you're on a plane? Did I read that wrong? :??

:teehee:



hehe, i actually typed that whilst i was in Colombo (Sri Lanka) waiting for a flight (i think, i am quite disorientated after 2 days fo travelling). Oh and i am writing this sat in the lobby of a Japanese youth hostel.

I managed to get Jaywalker number 1 finished and to cast on for number 2. :yay:

panchita
07-11-2008, 01:16 AM
I'm glad it all worked out for you. I knit on a domestic flight from northern California to Phoenix, Arizona in February with no problems.. I had read the TSA website for updates the day before my flight. It said that "big needles" may be confiscated on a case by case basis on the judgement of the TSA screeners. I decided not to risk it and took bamboo dpns for baby hats. I could even take small sewing scissors. It was great!