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RuthieinMaryland
07-18-2008, 01:58 PM
Hi, Knitters! :muah:

Although I've just gotten reacquainted with knitting over the last year or so, I'm picking up lots of hints, tips and tricks for making the work easier or more fun. I have a feeling most knitters experience the same thing, so I thought it would be a great deal if we have a specific thread just for tips, tricks, etc.

If you agree, please write in with your favorites. And don't overlook the "obvious" ones. One person's "obvious" can often be another person's lightning bolt of inspiration! (been there, done that!!!!)

To get us started -

TIP:

I was knitting a sock the other evening and needed stitch markers. But my little bag of clover markers must have grown feet and left the area.

I remembered something I'd heard/read about using drinking straws to make temporary, disposable stitch markers - cutting thin bands from drinking straws and slipping them over the needles to use as stitch markers.

The regular straws will work on needles to about size 7 and the fatter "slurpy-type" ones can be used on the larger needles. To change from one needle to the other, just slide the little plastic circle up to the tapered end of the left needle and lift it off with the right.

:woohoo: Saved the day for me! Also, when you no longer need the markers, just snip them off! One drinking straw has a LOT of mileage in it for stitch markers!

OK, folks - hope to hear from you all soon!

Ruthie :knitting:

Jan in CA
07-18-2008, 02:07 PM
Off the top of my head these are the first to come to mind..

1. Use a lifeline especially when doing lace, but it's handy for any large project you don't want to have to frog back to the beginning.

2. Learn what the stitches look like. I can't emphasize this enough! Once you learn it's so much easier to 'read' your knitting and know where you are in a pattern or see mistakes.

knitpurlgurl
07-18-2008, 02:10 PM
I use bits of yarn left over as stitch markers.

I've learned that if you are knitting in Magic Loop and you separate the stitches with the working yarn on the back needle, you'll always know when you are at the beginning of a round because the working yarn will end up at the beginning of each round!

Limey
07-18-2008, 02:27 PM
Hi

One thing I cannot do without is a pencil and a shorthand notebook - OK then, two.

Even if I'm working ordinary stocking stitch, I write lines of numbers from 1- 10; 2 - 20, for the rows and tick (check|)them off as I work. It helps alot of I'm knitting the fronts of cardigans and want to be certain I've knitted the same number of rows on each side, say, when I get to the decreases for under arms and necklines.

If I'm working with a pattern that has just a few rows, and is just a few repeat stitches wide, I write out each pattern row on a separate line and use a different coloured pen to mark off the pattern, like this, using a tick mark or cross

Row 1 - Pattern Stitches X X X

Row 2 - Pattern Stitches X X X

Row 3 - Pattern Stitches X X

Row 4 - Pattern Stitches X X

Looking at that, I know that I've just finished row or round 2 of the pattern and how many rows or rounds I've knitted so far (10).

Using different coloured pens means there's less chance of mis-reading how many rows I've worked; writing out the pattern helps to get it into my head and saves me having to battle with sometimes very small print.

Ellie

fireflyknitter
07-18-2008, 03:09 PM
I use earrings as stitch markers. :) My favorite one is a continuous hoop but I'll use anything hoopy. I don't wear earrings anymore so it's nice to get some use out of them!

Jaxhil
07-18-2008, 08:57 PM
Okay, here's my 2 cents worth, and maybe not worth much more, but here goes anyway..

When working a pattern repeat, I always use a clicker counter, or row counter of some sort. So I will always know where I left off, whenever I end a row I click the counter to the row I should start on *next*, when I return to my work.

With four kids, I *always* put my work away when I put it down for even a minute. I do this as a pro-active way to keep accidental damage and lost needles, etc, to a minimum. My DM who of course has no kids to bother her is always losing needles because she justs sets her project down assuming it won't go anywhere, lol. Somehow things happen anyway! So my advice is to always put your work in a basket, bag, or whatever, to keep it together while you're not working at it. Oh, and pick it up so it doesn't get stepped/sat on,thus avoiding broken needles (and un-necessary pain!! :shock:)

I hope I haven't just jinxed myself :teehee:

knitpurlgurl
07-18-2008, 09:24 PM
Kinda along the lines of what Hilary was saying: I put each project in it's own giant Ziploc with a paper copy of the pattern (marked where I left off), the project itself and the needles. On the front of the Ziploc, I write the name of the pattern, the yarn name, colorway, and Dye #, where I purchased the yarn, and the date I cast on. I keep them all on a shelf and when I go somewhere to knit, I grab my ziplock bag and throw it in my knitting bag.

momwolf
07-19-2008, 12:09 AM
1-NEVER be any where near Limey when she is knitting with DPNs:roflhard::roflhard:

2-Get a magnet board to hold your pattern,the magnet keeps your place for you.
3-Always keep a crochet hook with you to pickup dropped stitches or to fix a mistake 4 rows down
4-I use a fishing tackle box to keep my knitting accessories in
5-I use a bamboo needle for a cable needle because they are not slippery.I always use a needle 4 sizes smaller so it is easier to grab the cable sts off the smaller needle

Alyce
07-19-2008, 01:03 AM
I love the idea of writing info of the front of the bag. I think if I had to look at the date I started a project every time I picked it up I might work a little harder on it. LOL.:rofl:
Seriously, I think it is a good way to keep that info handy.
My tip is: I always make a working copy of my pattern so I can mark on it or whatever. The original stays in a plastic sleeve in my notebook of patterns. I'm only a little organized though. I don't even have them in Alphabetical order.:wink:

RuthieinMaryland
07-19-2008, 07:42 AM
Hi, Jax! Your advice is worth a LOT more than 2 cents! I have no little ones to disturb my knitting, but I manage to "disturb" it all the time! So just yesterday I bought a large rectangular lined straw bag to tuck things away in when I'm not knitting. I've been forever having to get my DH to move the sofa so I can retrieve needles, stitch markers, etc. Not any more! Thanks.

Ruthie :o)

Jaxhil
07-19-2008, 08:25 AM
Momwolf-ROFLOL about the DPns and Limey :teehee:; and I use a fishing tackle box too.

And the crochet hook is a great idea-I need to do that! I try to, but I often find myself without one anyway.

Alyce, great idea writing the date on the bag! I have a feeling that might motivate me a bit :shock: lol!

I'm glad my two cents is a help to you Ruthie! :)

Limey
07-19-2008, 09:04 AM
[quote=momwolf;1131291]1-NEVER be any where near Limey when she is knitting with DPNs:roflhard::roflhard:

Cheeky Hound!!!, Momwolf

You keep your knitting tackle in a fishing basket? - what did ya catch? Moby Dick?

I've seen trawlers with fishing baskets smaller than yours!!! - in fact, I think the entire UK fishing fleet would have trouble finding enough space to stash your stash!:roflhard::roflhard:

I think this is a brilliant thread and everyone's coming up with some great ideas.

I should get something decent to house my projects, Hilary, keep on using carrier bags, which is ok for small stuff but anything knitted for an adult keeps spilling :doh:out.

I find it handy too, to have a crochet hook at the ready and where I can, have a duplicate set of needles to the ones I'm using, for when my hands get clammy in warm weather (fat chance!) - I just keep the duplicate set in the fridge, so that they're lovely and cool.

gingerbread
07-19-2008, 10:11 AM
My tip is I use a three ring binder for my dpn's and odd size circulars. I put them in a sleeve and now I can put it on my shelf next to my sofa. I also keep my crochet hooks in a old plastic spice container. It is just the right size for them. I keep the shaker top on it and the different sizes fit just right.
So this is my two cents worth. I also did cover the three ring binder the way we used to cover our books for school. :teehee:
I don't think the kids do that anymore. My mom could use just about anything around the house. So of course I just did learn do it also. I don't sew but boy give me paper and I could cover anything.:roflhard::roflhard:
PS.
I used paper and glue to cover the binder. Tape is just to tacky.

:roflhard:

RuthieinMaryland
07-19-2008, 11:12 AM
Hi, Teri! Great idea about the 3-ring binder with sleeves! I've GOT to get out to Staples or Office Depot soon!

You all are a hoot, and the ideas you're writing up are super! Here's a new one from me.

TIP: Easy pattern reading

When I first started knitting again, I was back to square one. Of course, the patterns that appealed to me most were pretty complex with stuff like 8 row pattern repeats, etc., but I was game and I'd found KH!

I was making afgans and baby blankets for the family. I was afraid I'd go blind trying to read and follow those tiny little lines of type in the pattern books, to say nothing of the confusion! So the first thing I did with a pattern was to re-write each row on an individual 5x7 index card.

I used symbols for the stitches such as a box for knit stitches and an x for purls, trying to make it more visual.

If I had several knit stitches I'd draw the box and write the appropriate type and amount of stitches (example: K 6 inside a box or X-6 written like that). I broke the pattern for that row down into what looked like logical sequences and wrote each on a different line of the card, using every other line. (I used a gel pen so the ink was darker and easier to read.)

Then I'd stack my index cards on the sofa next to me and just move the current card to the back when I was finished the row.

I always knew where I was in the pattern (once I got in the habit of turning the card as soon as I was finished the row!) Also, as I wrote the pattern out on the cards I was getting familiar with it. Once it was written out with the symbols I could lay the cards out and actually see how the pattern was formed.

It's been well worth the time so far to write up my little "cheat sheets"!
And an added plus is that I can file the cards in a file box to use if I want to do the pattern again, or to repair one I've done if it's damaged.

Hope this helps!

Ruthie

Jan in CA
07-19-2008, 12:44 PM
Wow, great tips everyone! I have a few comments/ideas..

I hate stitch and row counters. It's too easy for someone (old or young) to come up and say 'what's this?' and then fiddle with the dial. :doh: I keep pencil and notepad next to me while knitting patterns I need to keep track on. If the pattern has a 4 row repeat I make hashmarks for each row then move down a line for the next repeat. I also circle the row that has the lifeline on it so if I have to frog I know exactly where I was in the pattern.

I second the crochet hook, too. Very handy for those dropped stitches!

adding to my previous list -

3. Keep coilless safety pins in your bag. They are great if you have to mark something below the row you're one or whatever. You can get them in the beading section of stores.

kellybigeyes
07-19-2008, 12:52 PM
I also circle the row that has the lifeline on it so if I have to frog I know exactly where I was in the pattern.


I am still new to some of this stuff. Can someone please explain to me what a "lifeline" is?

Thanks

Jan in CA
07-19-2008, 01:05 PM
I am still new to some of this stuff. Can someone please explain to me what a "lifeline" is?

Thanks

A 'lifeline' is a piece of thin yarn or something like dental floss that you put through the stitches on your needle to mark a row that is error free. You can use a yarn needle to go through the stitches or if you use circular needles some of them have a hole at the base where you can tie something like the floss and then knit normally. However you do it when it is in the while row you pull it through so you have two ends. I tie them in a knot then knit normally. Now if you have to frog/rip back you don't have to go all the way to the beginning of the project. Move them up or add more as you go up the project. For things like lace especially they are indispensable. I am using one on my sweater though, too.

kellybigeyes
07-19-2008, 01:14 PM
Thanks Jan. That is a great idea!! I'll have to remember that!

knitpurlgurl
07-20-2008, 10:19 AM
You can put patterns in (certain) page protectors and use dry-erase markers to mark on the page protector. Then take dry-erase cleaning solution and wipe the protector free.

Limey
07-20-2008, 10:39 AM
Hiya Folks

I've found out that it pays to be careful which way you point a stitch holder if you're using it to hold stitches at the back of a cardigan.

It's all well and good the pattern saying place so many stitches on a holder - what it doesn't tell you is to watch which end of the holder you place them on.

I've recently picked up some stitches on the right front and neck of a child's cardigan and had my stitch holder with the point going to the right as well - that means that I've gone up the side of the cardigan and now the stitch holder is facing the wrong way - have to put the held stitches on something else so that I can transfer them to the working needle.

In other words, if you usually start picking up stitches on a right front or neckline, make sure that the pointed end of the stitch holder is facing left (from inside the garment) when you place the stitches on the holder.

If you don't, you'll have the wrong end of the holder facing you and if you used a knitting needle as a holder, you'll end up with the blunt end at the wrong end for you to pick up.

Hope this makes sense.

Ellie

catcook
07-20-2008, 04:39 PM
Great tips here! Especially the life line! Since I haven't knitted much I can't tell you how many times I ripped out the whole piece because I couldn't get the stitches or kept dropping a stitich or just plain messed it up trying to frog. Sorry I don't have any tips maybe some day I will have knitted enough to contribute.

tokmom
07-20-2008, 08:29 PM
I keep safety pins in my box. If I'm needing to pick up a lost stitch, I like to anchor it first, just in case it decides to undo itself further down the row.

My girlfriend found me the neatest knitting gadget. It's a small crochet hook on one end and a knitting needle on the other. It's about 3 inches long. I sadly use that thing every time I knit:roflhard: , but it sure is handy!

RuthieinMaryland
07-21-2008, 09:35 AM
I keep safety pins in my box. If I'm needing to pick up a lost stitch, I like to anchor it first, just in case it decides to undo itself further down the row.

My girlfriend found me the neatest knitting gadget. It's a small crochet hook on one end and a knitting needle on the other. It's about 3 inches long. I sadly use that thing every time I knit:roflhard: , but it sure is handy!

GREAT idea about the safety pins, Kelly!:muah: It can get pretty nerve-wracking trying to catch those stitches. This is a super safety net.

Thanks,
Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
07-21-2008, 09:41 AM
Great tips here! Especially the life line! Since I haven't knitted much I can't tell you how many times I ripped out the whole piece because I couldn't get the stitches or kept dropping a stitich or just plain messed it up trying to frog. Sorry I don't have any tips maybe some day I will have knitted enough to contribute.

Don't worry, Kitty-Kat! :p It won't take long before you're either frantically searching for solutions or inventing your own. Desperation, NOT necessity, is the real mother of invention! And there's not much more desperate than a knitter who's balled something up after putting in hours and hours of work. :teehee:

So stay tuned, learn lots, and then send in your solutions, too! They'll be appreciated, especially since you'll probably be looking at things with a new (to knitting) pair of eyes.

Thanks, again!
Ruthie :knitting:

MAmaDawn
07-21-2008, 10:25 AM
I don't ever remember to mark paper when I'm knitting. So the paper and pencil to keep track just wasn't working for me and neither would the row counters that sit next to you.

I use the ones that hang on your work. Like this (http://www.knitpicks.com/Knitting+Row+Counter_AD80244.html) one.

And the lifeline, that's has saved me so many hours of re-knitting.

I use hairties for stitch markers. They move easily because they are stretchy.

I also keep a copy of all the patterns I use on my computer. I just save them as doc or pdfs. That way if I lose my copy I can print another.

Raverly has help me a lot too with keeping track of what I'm doing for big projects, like yarn I need and such.

I also keep my work in plastic ziplock bags. And my statch too.

margz3
07-21-2008, 01:58 PM
If I find a pattern that I know I will use over and over, I write each row on an index card, punch a hole in the top left corner and attach the cards with a binder ring. You can then flip through as you continue each row. On the last card (well, the card before any finishing instructions) I note how many repeats of the pattern to make (actually, I do all this on the computer and laminate the cards - that way I can tick off any repeats with-in the rows, or if there are sections of the pattern that are straight repeats (ie. knit 8 rows...) ) I will also usually start the cards with a pic of the finished product, then any special instructions, then onto the pattern rows.

hope that was clear!

Limey
07-21-2008, 02:18 PM
I keep safety pins in my box. If I'm needing to pick up a lost stitch, I like to anchor it first, just in case it decides to undo itself further down the row.

My girlfriend found me the neatest knitting gadget. It's a small crochet hook on one end and a knitting needle on the other. It's about 3 inches long. I sadly use that thing every time I knit:roflhard: , but it sure is handy!

************************************************8

Hi Kelly

Is this the sort of gadget you mean? Looks really handy, kind of thing that should be superglued to my wrist :??:zombie::eyes::figureditout:when I'm working 'awkward' patterns, as I call them

http://www.coatsandclark.com/cgi-bin/MsmGo.exe?grab_id=439&page_id=8721664&query=Handi+tool&hiword=HAND+HANDED+HANDS+HANDY+Handi+TOOLIS+TOOLS+ tool+

Many thanks for posting, I'll definitely get one.

Ellie

Wanda Witch
07-21-2008, 02:29 PM
I have been reading so many useful tips here. I have all sorts of 'gadgets' I've purchased since resuming knitting, but I must get one of the Coats and Clark knitting needle on one end and crochet hook on the other. I do keep a crochet hook at hand, small scissors, retractable tape measure and my indispensable row counters, yes two, as I would be lost without them. Heck, whatever works is fine. Keep the tips coming in as I know for certain I am learning a bunch from I've just read.

RuthieinMaryland
07-21-2008, 05:24 PM
[QUOTE=MAmaDawn;1132101]I don't ever remember to mark paper when I'm knitting. So the paper and pencil to keep track just wasn't working for me and neither would the row counters that sit next to you.

Hi! I also got impatient with marking paper or turning a stitch counter when I'm knitting. I just wanna keep going! :)

But there were times I had to count rows and/or repeats in a pattern. So I just put some pennies in a bowl and sat it next to me and then I could take one out (one-handed, of course!) and line it up on the sofa or table next to me. I could tell which number of repeat I was on just by looking at the coins.

I guess for a more complex pattern you could use nickles AND pennies and even quarters, depending on how much you have to keep track of (and if you've been to the yarn shop, how solvent your finances are!!!:roflhard: )

Either way, I found this simple. Hope it works for 'ya!

Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
07-21-2008, 05:42 PM
[QUOTE=margz3;1132180]If I find a pattern that I know I will use over and over, I write each row on an index card, punch a hole in the top left corner and attach the cards with a binder ring.

Hey, Margaret! :)

I wrote up a tip a bit earlier about how I use index cards, too - they're wonderful! But you added a whole 'nother dimension!!! The binder clip ring and LAMINATING the cards!!! Wowser! :yay:

You go, girl!!! This thread is turning out so great!

More, more, more...:muah:

Ruthie

tokmom
07-21-2008, 11:22 PM
************************************************8

Hi Kelly

Is this the sort of gadget you mean? Looks really handy, kind of thing that should be superglued to my wrist :??:zombie::eyes::figureditout:when I'm working 'awkward' patterns, as I call them

http://www.coatsandclark.com/cgi-bin/MsmGo.exe?grab_id=439&page_id=8721664&query=Handi+tool&hiword=HAND+HANDED+HANDS+HANDY+Handi+TOOLIS+TOOLS+ tool+

Many thanks for posting, I'll definitely get one.

Ellie


Yes! That's it. My gf found it at an Artco store, which is like an outlet for crafts? I have never been. It was in the dollar section. She hasn't seen them since.
Gosh, I will look for a backup one, now that I know you can buy them. Thanks for posting the link.:yay:
I honestly lost it for 2 days (under the couch), and had to resort to a regular crochet hook. It just isn't the same.

Ellieblue
07-22-2008, 12:09 PM
I like to use an old daily desk calendar for counting rows. The small one's that have a separate page for each day. Even though it only goes to 31 days, I just repeat the pages. I also use a separate set to keep track of row counts for a pattern, just have to remember to flip the pages at the end of each row.

rachejm
07-22-2008, 05:21 PM
I'll have to get one of those crochet hook/needle things, sounds like a great idea!

I always have to have paper and pencil to keep track of my knitting, row counters just don't work for me, I forget about them. I find it harder to ignore the big blue clipboard that has all my current patterns attached to it!

Two of the best tricks I've learned are tinking and inserting a needle into a destination row. Both of which I learned from this article (http://knitty.com/ISSUEwinter03/FEATwin03TT.html).

I find it tricky inserting a knitting needle into a destination row so I tend to use a piece of thread or something but the idea is the same.

G J
07-22-2008, 05:40 PM
This thread is GREAT!
Here's my tip. For all those little things that can get lost in the bottom of the knitting bag, use one of the little make-up bags that you get "free with purchase" from many of the major make-up companies when they have their "Free with purchase" deals. I keep my scissors (on a cork, so it doesn't poke through), tape measure, crochet hook, stitch markers, lifeline thread, plastic needles and a piece of sand paper and a piece of rubber jar opener stuff. What are the last two items for? Sand paper is for lightly sanding rough edges on either needles or finger nails! (I know--a nail file would work, but they disappear) and the jar opener rubber stuff is for the Options needles. Works great for tightening them.

Debbie
07-22-2008, 06:52 PM
Stitch Markers, Stitch Markers, Stitch Markers .... I use them for even the smallest repeat or to remind me to knit the two or three stitches at the edge of a dish cloth. Even if a pattern only has 4 or five stitches in it, I know immediately if I have made a mistake.
My favorite stitch markers are jump rings. I get them in the jewelry making area of the craft store. They come in all sizes, they are inexpensive (so you don't feel like you have to search for a lost one) and you get a whole bunch of them.

Indygirl
07-22-2008, 07:10 PM
This is a really great thread! I don't have any new knitting tips. I do however, have a tip for shopping for your knitting accessaries.
This is the time of year Target, or any of the places that sell school supplies have great prices.
I was in Target yesterday just wondering around and found these in the school supplies. I'm going to keep my dpn's in the 3 ringer pencil pouch. My odd's and end's in the zipper bag. my circular needles that I use most often in the plastic box. they were all very inexpensive.
The ringer pouch was $1.49 ea. the zipper bag was $2.99, The box was $2.99

Sknitter56
07-22-2008, 08:03 PM
My tip is to use those little tins that have mints in them for your small items to keep from losing them in the couch or chair, etc. I even bought a can of cookies the other day because it was tall (about 7") and about as big around as a CD. My first thought was...I could use that for needles. I always put something soft in the bottom of the container to protect the needle points. Also, go on E-bay if you need needles, yarn, etc. I like the vintage needles and they're always available and you can usually get them at a good price. That's one way to add to your supply of needles.

Limey
07-24-2008, 11:41 AM
Hi

Being of a natural bodging nature (making something for nowt and a perennial pack rat) I've been using the cylinder from the inside of a cling film pack to store my DPNs - or Scuds as my hubby refers to them.

He says I nearly had his eye out once - :roll: men are such babies - it was a good quarter of an inch from his eye socket - dunno why he was making such a fuss.

Sorry ... oh yes, the cylinder. I got the inside foamy round pad thing from a coffee jar lid, cut it to size to fit the bottom of the cylinder and fixed it in place with duct tape. To stop the needles from spilling out the top of the container, I make a little pom pom and pop it on top.

This doesn't sound very appealing but if you have any small children or grand children lurking around, you could ask them to paint the cylinder with acrylic paint or get some pretty gift-wrap, and stick it to the cylinder with PVA glue.

I'm sure there are lots of decorative effects they could do and it struck me as being a cheap and cheerful present for them to make for their favourite knitters at Xmas.

Ellie

PS - Sorry, I meant the idea might not sound very appealing - not anyone's children or grandchildren :oops:

RuthieinMaryland
07-25-2008, 12:00 AM
Hi - I've just got to share this with all of you. Today I went to a welding supply shop and bought a tube of stainless steel "tig rods" for just under $16. The tube holds about 25-30 1/16" rods, 3 feet long, which is more than enough for blocking my largest afghan. They came in a nice, heavy plastic tube with a loop at the top for hanging!

Also, I stopped at Lowe's and spent another $16.88 for a big package of those snap-together floor mat tiles (the ones for kids with letters of the alphabet) that will make a perfect base for stretching the afghans on the rods and then pinning them down right into the mat tiles.

For under $32 I'm set to block almost anything. So maybe go hang out at your local welding supply shop, too!

Ruthie:happydance:

PS - If you need flexible stainless steel wire for blocking curves, they also sell that. It's a very large spool of wire, though, so you might want to divide the wire (and the cost) with other knitting friends.

RuthieinMaryland
07-25-2008, 11:24 AM
Hey, Ellie -

GREAT idea about decorating the cans/tubes that are recycled for holding needles and other really important knitting "stuff"!

We're having a family party next Sunday (24-26 people) and when we get them all together I try to have some art projects for the little ones and the ladies as well. The male types are self-occupying with sports, playing pool/ping pong, etc. so they're no worry. Usually I have some small ceramic or wooden pieces and a bunch of acrylic paint and craft brushes and we get around the kitchen table (which is covered with thick brown paper) and paint while we talk. Then everybody gets to take home a little keepsake of the day.

I've got some of those tube type cans that Pringles chips come in and those'll make a GREAT project for the little ones (7 and 9) to decorate for me for my needles. (they like to make things for Granma). It never even occurred to me until I read your post!:doh:

So thanks for that!

Ruthie :happydance:

RuthieinMaryland
07-25-2008, 10:49 PM
I found it, I found it, I found it!:woohoo:

I've been looking for this site for awhile now since it's such a great article about blocking using waste yarn, particularly for lace projects (which I haven't really attempted yet, but it's on the burner!). And while organizing my bookmarks, which have multiplied like rabbits since I've been on this site, there it was!

http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2005/08/23/walk_around_the_block.html

It's a SUPER article with very good pictures which will set lace knitters up for easily blocking unusual pieces.

Have fun!
Ruthie

Debkcs
07-26-2008, 03:11 AM
What a great thread!

My hint: surround yourself with wonderful people who knit. Family members, those good folks at your LYS, and most importantly, here at Knitting Help. Look how many splendid tips we got from this one thread! You have a question, problem or heartbreak? We can help.

You are all wonderful!

Slim
07-26-2008, 08:48 AM
[quote=margz3;1132180]If I find a pattern that I know I will use over and over, I write each row on an index card, punch a hole in the top left corner and attach the cards with a binder ring. You can then flip through as you continue each row. On the last card (well, the card before any finishing instructions) I note how many repeats of the pattern to make (actually, I do all this on the computer and laminate the cards - that way I can tick off any repeats with-in the rows, or if there are sections of the pattern that are straight repeats (ie. knit 8 rows...) ) I will also usually start the cards with a pic of the finished product, then any special instructions, then onto the pattern rows.quote]

Exactly! I print them on the computer too, and laminate them with clear contact paper. Here's a pic:

Crycket
07-26-2008, 11:21 AM
I found it, I found it, I found it!:woohoo:

I've been looking for this site for awhile now since it's such a great article about blocking using waste yarn, particularly for lace projects (which I haven't really attempted yet, but it's on the burner!). And while organizing my bookmarks, which have multiplied like rabbits since I've been on this site, there it was!

http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2005/08/23/walk_around_the_block.html

It's a SUPER article with very good pictures which will set lace knitters up for easily blocking unusual pieces.

Have fun!
Ruthie

I think the best advice in that lies in someones comment...

"I love the string idea its great! I used to block on the bed as well until I discovered that the baby foam blocks that the alphabets come on that interlock and the babies crawl on as a mat works just as great. Better I think as you can have your bed at night! OH and the best part about the blocks is that they are able to be staning upright to save precious space!!

Libby"

My next purchase is going to be those blocks!

rachael72knitter
07-26-2008, 01:15 PM
I haven't been knitting for too long, but here are some of my tips anyway-
a lot of those gadgets they sell you don't necessarily need esp. the st holders and the markers, yarn and safety pins work great as well as those tiny hairbands or rubber bands

I keep all my straights in a wine carafe and this way they don't get lost or bend

if you have to unravel a row, get familiar with the correct way to reinsert your needle into the sts so that they don't twist

always leave a long tail

if you are running low on your yarn and wondering if you have enough to do just that one more, check to see that your yarn is four times the row plus about 6 inches for a tail

I have found that lots of row counters/st counters are not a waste of money, it's nice to have more than one for several WIPs

when you want to substitute the yarn, look at the needle size for the pattern and look for that same gauge on the label of the yarn

when you have to make a portion of the pattern twice, like sleeves, and you are not knitting two at the same time, count the rows and mark it so that you can be sure they are the same length when you go to sew up

Mattress stitch for just about everything

def. get some darning needles

matching embroidery thread is excellent for sewing on buttons- regular thread is too thin and yarn is too bulky

go by the measurements in a pattern and not the size

buy a large size bulletin board and lots of non-rust T-pins for blocking

always do the gauge, esp. when you are just starting out

read the pattern all the way through before you start knitting it so that you don't find out about something you should have done until it is already too late

also, if you don't want a bunch of loose ends that you will have to weave in, you can knit the first four or three stitches with the tail and then cut it off once you are done blocking the project you are working on

Hope these tips are helpful from a knitter who is just now learning all the tips herself:aww:

RuthieinMaryland
07-26-2008, 07:25 PM
I think the best advice in that lies in someones comment...

"I love the string idea its great! I used to block on the bed as well until I discovered that the baby foam blocks that the alphabets come on that interlock and the babies crawl on as a mat works just as great. Better I think as you can have your bed at night! OH and the best part about the blocks is that they are able to be staning upright to save precious space!!

Libby"

My next purchase is going to be those blocks!

Too true, Libby - I wrote earlier about getting stainless steel "tig rods" from a welding supply shop for under $16 (to use as blocking wire - 25-30 3' pieces ) and I got those blocks the same day at
Lowe's for just $16.88.

Happy shopping! :happydance:

Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
07-26-2008, 07:31 PM
Wow, Rachel! What a great contribution to the thread! :yay:

Isn't it amazing how much you learn when you're first starting out and are still trying to figure out the questions, let alone answers! But you've got some really good tips here and are very generous in sharing so much!

Here's to 'ya:clink: Keep knitting and keep those tips coming!

Ruthie:waving:

rachael72knitter
07-26-2008, 09:50 PM
Wow, Rachel! What a great contribution to the thread! :yay:

Isn't it amazing how much you learn when you're first starting out and are still trying to figure out the questions, let alone answers! But you've got some really good tips here and are very generous in sharing so much!

Here's to 'ya:clink: Keep knitting and keep those tips coming!

Ruthie:waving:

Oh my gosh. Thanks.:muah:

Ronda
07-28-2008, 07:18 AM
I love these tips!

Learning to tink has been extremely helpful to me. I seem to do it a lot! I have a lot of trouble getting stitches back on the needles when I frog, so tinking has saved me from a lot of frustration! http://knitty.com/ISSUEwinter03/FEATwin03TT.html

momwolf
07-28-2008, 07:47 AM
I just told someone about this when making toys.
Use pantyhose to line the pieces of the toy and the stuffing won't show through:teehee:

Karina
07-28-2008, 08:38 AM
I have a cheap all in one HP printer and when I buy magazines, book or patterns the first thing I do is scan the patterns that I really like so they are on the computer and I can print out a copy whenever I need one. If the kids get a hold of the copy it is no longer a big deal, I just print out another. The originals are then put away safely. I also only print out the page that I am currently working on so as not to waist to much paper.

Sunni
07-28-2008, 04:53 PM
used to be intimidated by finishing until I found the best tool ever!!!
I was wandering around in my local Wal-Mart and I was in the hair care department and noticed the little butterfly clips that we use to pin up the front of our hair.
I thought to myself, "self, those would be MUCH better than Knit Klips for holding the seam straight for the finishing of garments!" :yay:
I now have a collection of those just for knitting!! Much less expensive and more to a pack than the Knit Klips which I found were not particularly great at holding the seam firm while sewing as they only have the one tooth to secure the seam.
Personally I pin them in about a half an inch from each other along the seam and then remove them as I progress.

I hope this helps to ease some fear/cowardice/anxiety when it comes to finishing those spectacular garments you don't want to ruin with sub-par finishing!

Lisa R.
07-28-2008, 09:38 PM
Oh! Love the butterfly clip idea. I was trying to remember the name of the Knit Klips the other day, thinking I might possibly need them if I go ahead with a couple of projects I'm thinking of! Now, I'll just head to Wal-Mart!

laikabear
07-29-2008, 03:04 AM
This was mentioned in another thread but it was such a neat tip. From Artlady:

If you have to frog a piece of work entirely and start over, instead of ripping the whole piece, just grab the free end and cast on, and then unravel the old piece as you knit the new piece. That way the yarn is handled one less time, and doesn't have to be wound into balls. This tip is awesome and I'm using it right now!

I haven't been knitting long enough to have many tips of my own. I do like to reinsert needles that are a couple sizes smaller than the ones I am using if I frog a portion of my work. Since the needle you knit onto determines the size of the stitch, it is okay to do so and it makes it easier to get the needles back in. I pinch the work as I replace the loops so I don't pull any of the adjacent stitches loose, and work my way around (or across) until they are all back on the needles. I don't worry too much about orientation, I always check it when I do the next round.

And of course use the videos on the site. I refer to them often for a new technique or even one I haven't done in a while. I love KH! :cheering:

rachael72knitter
07-31-2008, 12:24 PM
Just thought of a couple more-

Anytime you buy an article of clothing from the store, it comes with an extra replacement button; save those in a container for your knitting projects. I go through them often and use those buttons and save myself a trip to the store to buy one.

Also, def. need to add to your supply a measuring tape. I had one of those that you had to wind up, and it kept getting tangles in my other things, needles, yarn, etc. so at Hobbly Lobby, I bought a tiny one that is retractable for 99 cents. A very good little buy and very handy.

dana5577
08-01-2008, 08:10 PM
Dear All,

I cannot say enough about blue painter's tape. I write out my patterns, and just move the tape down on the paper when I finish a row. I also use it in books to follow down the page of the pattern. The tape is tacky enough to hold your place, but won't ruin or tear your books or paper.

I also use my stitch holder as a storage device. I loop all of my smaller holders, stitch marker devices, even a small pair of scissors on my largest stitch holder.

dana5577:muah:

cheffo
08-02-2008, 08:17 AM
i just started knitting a really complicated pattern and i needed stitch markers which i have never used so i just used saftey pins. is that okay??????:knitting:

kaidyddd
08-02-2008, 09:24 AM
Safety pins make great markers. You can slip them along on your needles or pin through a stitch to mark it until your project is done. Regular safety pins are okay, but if you have any coiless safety pins (usually found with beading supplies if your LYS doesn't have them) work even better. Less to catch on to the yarn and they hang flatter against your work.

Nanaof6
08-02-2008, 06:04 PM
I'm a beginner ,only been knitting now for about two years. I have my Emmalou she is an Austrailian Shepherd 'Aussie' DH and I live in a house that you can not hide the fact that a dog lives there too. Dog hair is everywhere! So, because of that fact I found when I started knitting that my yarn would always look like Mohair yarn, when in fact it wasn't. DH has made me Yarn holders out of our empty Folgers Plastic coffee containers . He drills holes in the center of the lids and pops a rubber gorommt in the hole so the yarn doesn't nag it. He uses the largest plastic Yogurt containers too. They work super and now my yarn stays dog hair free as I knit.

I also carry in my knitting bag nail clippers and a nail file ,just in case I get a nag . It's happen to me .

I also bought myself my own laminating machine and I laminate my favorite patterns and then I can use a dry erase marker on them to mark were I am at on the pattern. Plus is keep my pattern safe and clean.

I make my own sts markers from beads that I have collected for making my own jewelry. This way you can custom make sts holders and markers using the pewter letter beads .

Limey
08-04-2008, 01:11 PM
Hi

Sometimes when I copy and paste a free pattern into a word document, I have a good look at how the pattern stitches are set out in the type.

I came across one the other day where most of the * for the start of the pattern stitches were all under each other - same position on each separate line, so nice and easy to read and follow.

K2 * slip 1, P7,etc
P2 * slip 1, K8


However, after row 14 - just three odd lines (not consecutive) were set out like this
* slip 1, K2, P7 etc

It looks easy to spot here but there was closely-packed type above and below, as is the usual with patterns.

Anyway, I find going through the pattern and highlighting each * in a different colour and using bold, *is well worth the couple of minutes it takes to do but above all, it makes me realise just how easy it is to mis-read a pattern!

I also highlight anything I find important but missed on the first quick read-through.

Best Wishes

Ellie

Viridian
08-04-2008, 03:23 PM
I don't have many tips that I don't think are common sense when it comes to knitting, but here goes. :)

1. I'm in the lifeline party. Add them. I do this especially when I'm doing cables, where I'll have an 8-10 row repeat and it's impossible for me to figure out where to pick up.

2. Figure out what ALL stitches look like. Knits, purls, twisted, k2togs, ssks, m1. All of them. It'll make figuring out where you are LOADS easier.

3. You don't need to wash your ready-to-felt projects for felting. Merely dampen it in a sink and toss it in the dryer with towels and/or jeans. Works just as well!

4. Forget where the beginning of the round is? Look for the tail. Unless you knit part of it in, it'll tell you exactly where the beginning is.

5. Do not fear the frog. Do not resent the frog. Love the frog. It's hard, I know, but it must be done.

Knit4Pie
08-04-2008, 03:29 PM
5. Do not fear the frog. Do not resent the frog. Love the frog. It's hard, I know, but it must be done.

I love this! This has to be one of the hardest things. I'm well acquainted with the frog, but don't know if I'll ever love the frog!

Viridian
08-04-2008, 03:36 PM
I love this! This has to be one of the hardest things. I'm well acquainted with the frog, but don't know if I'll ever love the frog!

Truth be told, I don't love the frog yet either. It's more of, when it shows up, I sigh to calm myself and force myself to understand why it has to be done.

It doesn't mean I don't want to cry any less.

RuthieinMaryland
08-15-2008, 03:23 PM
Hi!

I just had a confusion about purling in continental cleared up. I noticed that Amy in the videos uses her middle finger to place the yarn around the needle in the purl stitch. I did it that way, too, although it was kind of awkward. Then I found this video which is an excellent demo of continental knitting. By positioning the yarn so it goes across the backs of three fingers, I'm able to dip my index finger to form the purl stitch very easily and smoothly. Check it out!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY&feature=related

Thanks!
Ruthie :hug:

laikabear
08-15-2008, 03:40 PM
Ruthie! There is another thread on KH right now about Continental purling being difficult and I was thinking the same thing. I knit just like the lady in that video! I tried making a video myself to show the OP the difference in using your index finger (I think it's so much less awkward). OMG, it is hard to make videos with just yourself and no tripod!

Anyway, mine's on my blog if anyone wants to see it (I am knitting with Malabrigo, at least :teehee: ). But the one you posted was great! :yay:

JamOKnit
08-15-2008, 04:23 PM
Since I just bought myself a ball winder and have been winding yarn balls like crazy, I've had to figure out a system to label the balls so I know what yarn it is. I take the band from the skein or hank, fold it flat, punch a hole in the corner with a single hole puncher, and then thread about a 6-inch piece of the yarn through it and tie a knot. Then I collect all of the paper bands in a multi-page clear protector and stick it in my three-ring binder with my patterns. Then, if I need to identify a ball of yarn, I can simply compare to my mini-samples to find out the name, colorway, weight, etc. Plus it helps me remember which yarn brands I like and have bought in the past.

hartleystudio
08-15-2008, 04:42 PM
Wow, this is great!

Here's my tip...I have two little ones and they like my row counter as well. (click-click-click that's fun!!!) I keep the pattern in a clear page protector and keep a china marker or a sharpie with me and I make notes on the page protector. I tick off rows, make corrections or changes. Then when I'm done I wipe off notes I don't want to keep and copy the pattern in the page protector and keep them together for the next time I want to make the pattern. (usually for a second sock)

Thanks to everyone for all the tips and tricks!!!

Shandeh
08-16-2008, 02:40 AM
Love this thread! :thumbsup:

...when I buy magazines, book or patterns the first thing I do is scan the patterns that I really like so they are on the computer and I can print out a copy whenever I need one.
I do the same thing! I keep all my scanned knitting patterns in a designated file on my computer. Occasionally, I burn a CD with all my knitting patterns on it. I like being able to carry all of my favorite patterns with me at once like that. I can look at them on my home computer, or my laptop, or my friend's computer, at the library, or wherever I want. :)
Sometimes when I copy and paste a free pattern into a word document, I have a good look at how the pattern stitches are set out in the type...........I find going through the pattern and highlighting each * in a different colour and using bold, *is well worth the couple of minutes it takes to do
I do this also, and I put the stitch patterns into easy-to-read rows, in a LARGE FONT, BOLDED. It makes it much easier to follow.

Here are a couple of my tips:
1) I use a music stand to hold my current pattern in front of my knitting chair. This leaves my hands free to work, and I can easily read the pattern.

2) When I first started learning to knit, I would use two different colored straight needles. This way, I was able to pay attention to what happened with each row of stitches. For example, if I was doing stockinette, I would do the purl row with a PINK needle, and the knit row with the other needle. This way, when I was using the pink needle, I would know it was time to purl. It really helped me understand what was happening with the stitches.

3) When I knit socks with dpns, I use dpn point protectors, to make them easier to carry in my knitting bag.
http://knittersreview.com/article_tool.asp?article=/review/product/060601_a.asp

RuthieinMaryland
08-16-2008, 09:50 PM
Hey, Maureen! :o) Glad you liked that little video on continental purling. It's made an awesome difference to me. I actually finished an afghan panel with sixty 6-row repeats in record time, now that I'm comfortable with the continental purl stitch done the way it was in the video.

I visited your blog, by the way and am looking forward to going through it when I have a bit more time to savor it!

Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
08-17-2008, 09:12 AM
[QUOTE=Shandeh;1142065]Love this thread! :thumbsup:


I do the same thing! I keep all my scanned knitting patterns in a designated file on my computer. Occasionally, I burn a CD with all my knitting patterns on it. I like being able to carry all of my favorite patterns with me at once like that. I can look at them on my home computer, or my laptop, or my friend's computer, at the library, or wherever I want. :)

Hi! Everyone is making this thread totally fantastic!

What great tips! I've been accumulating so much stuff - yarn, accessories, etc., plus patterns and a whole computer section of great stuff - that all these insights into getting them organized and keeping them that way are extremely valuable!

I just recently got a great sale on a put-it-together-yourself 2-door cabinet with six adjustable half-shelves and one long fixed shelf. I've earmarked it for corralling my knitting stuff, which is creeping throughout the house and starting to take over! I've got notebooks started and am using these wonderful tips to really get organized.

Keep them coming! :happydance: They're wonderful!

Ruthie:knitting:

lynn893
08-17-2008, 07:53 PM
5. Do not fear the frog. Do not resent the frog. Love the frog. It's hard, I know, but it must be done.

I love this! This has to be one of the hardest things. I'm well acquainted with the frog, but don't know if I'll ever love the frog!
:roflhard:
This one really made me smile! Personally, I hate frogging my work! I always mess up the stitches when putting them back on the needle. For some reason, they always get twisted or are backwards! :doh:

Then I get worried that I'm going to mess up the new row because my sts are wrong.... hehehe.

Shandeh
08-17-2008, 11:36 PM
I have a knitting DVD, which includes videos showing how to do different knitting techniques. One of the videos shows Jennifer from "Jennifer Knits" in Los Angeles, California. She says, "If you're not a good ripper, you're not a good knitter."

Every time I have to frog a row, I think of her saying that.

RuthieinMaryland
08-31-2008, 10:36 AM
Hi! :waving:

Earlier in this thread, I wrote in about a home-made blocking kit I'd just put together.

I've been using it to great effect and just wanted to let everyone know how it was working.

I went to a welding supply place and bought a tube of 3' "tig rods", stainless steel rods about i/16" thick and three feet long (under $16). At Lowe's, I bought a package of "alphabet blocks", ($16.88) 1 foot square dense foam type blocks you can use to make a floor mat for kids, and a perfect surface to stick pins in.

The alphabet letters separate from the larger blocks, so when I needed a longer size surface to pin an afghan to, I took some blocks from the center portion and left the alphabet letters in place. This gave me a great surface with no sagging because of missing blocks!

The "tig rods" (there were about 34 of them in the tube) have a flattened end that makes threading through the knitted piece so easy. No snags, and easy to overlap on the long sides of the afghans.

So for under $33 I got a killer blocking system! It works SO well, and the finished pieces look finished, very professional! I just put the afghans (all acrylic) in the washer on "hand-wash" or delicate, then take them out damp, thread the stainless wires along the edges, stretch and then pin the rods in place with stainless rust-proof T-pins.

I use a ping-pong table to spread out the blocks, but they'd work just as well on a bed or the floor.

Hope this is useful for you. It's made a huge difference for me and I can finally get a beautiful finish for my projects!

Right now I'm working on yet another afghan (one for each family member! I'm on #6 of 8) and starting to knit winter scarves for my yearly holiday gifts to friends, family and the elderly in the community. They will all get blocked, many at the same time, thanks to the foam blocks and the large number of rods that came in the tube from the welding supply shop.

Happy knitting!

Ruthie:clink:

cacunn
08-31-2008, 01:09 PM
I use the little jump rings from the bead making section of the craft stores. You can get a lot for a little cost.

When I come to a repeating pattern I link a number of the rings together to make a pattern counter. I have two color rings. If it is a 10 row repeat I place a different color ring at 5 so I know where I am. I place this counter one or two stitches in from the end of a row. Each time I come to the counter I advance one ring.

I have a yarn winder, but I have started using the winding stick more than the ball winder. There is a fancy name for this that means nest stick. As I was walking though the drug store I saw one of the round toothbrush holder. I picked one up. I glues buttons on each end to close the air holes. I now store dp needles inside the toothbrush holder and wrap yarn on the outside.

saracidaltendencies
08-31-2008, 01:35 PM
This may have already been mentioned (and many of you may already know this), if so, I apologize, however this is a handy little tip I heard about some time ago by a fellow knitter.

If you have to frog or your needle falls out of your work, or, you just lose a few stitches, don't worry about putting the stitches back on the needle the right way, just get your sts. on the needle. If your sts. are on the needle the wrong way, simply knit into the back of the stitch instead of the front. Makes picking up those stitches so much faster and easier!

kristaj
08-31-2008, 02:40 PM
I have a yarn winder, but I have started using the winding stick more than the ball winder. There is a fancy name for this that means nest stick.

What a coincidence. I was just looking at these. They are called Nostepinnes.

nephthys8
09-01-2008, 08:10 AM
Thank you to everyone for this thread! I am a newbie, so I am all about picking up tips and tricks. So far, my biggest problem has been storage. I have a standing knitting bag that was my grandmother's (not sure which grandmother, though!) and I bought a plastic bin with a lid for storing my stash, but my knitting needles and crochet hooks are a mess in the bottom of the bag. I will definitely steal a few of these ideas for myself! :mrgreen:

RuthieinMaryland
09-01-2008, 12:01 PM
Super tip! Thanks! :o)

lynn893
09-01-2008, 10:32 PM
Thank you to everyone for this thread! I am a newbie, so I am all about picking up tips and tricks. So far, my biggest problem has been storage. I have a standing knitting bag that was my grandmother's (not sure which grandmother, though!) and I bought a plastic bin with a lid for storing my stash, but my knitting needles and crochet hooks are a mess in the bottom of the bag. I will definitely steal a few of these ideas for myself! :mrgreen:a pringles can is fantastic for storing all your straight needles (after you've eaten the pringles, of course! Just wash out the can!

:yay:

nephthys8
09-02-2008, 11:03 AM
a pringles can is fantastic for storing all your straight needles (after you've eaten the pringles, of course! Just wash out the can!

:yay:

Hey, that's perfect! Thank you!! :hug: :mrgreen:

cacunn
09-02-2008, 02:21 PM
There was a hint to store your patterns, etc, on CD and take the CD with you. This is a great idea for backing up your goody lists if your system fails. However, it may be easier to carry a flash/thumb drive in your knitting bag. Unlike a cd a flash drive can be updated on the go. Flash drive prices are going down and storage is always going up.

If you are at a friends and they have a great pattern on file that you would like a copy of (check copyright requirements) plug your flask drive in and down load it.

As stated above check copyrights and make sure your anti-virus is up to date.

MAmaDawn
09-02-2008, 02:39 PM
A lot of MP3 players will store docs and pdfs too

cacunn
09-02-2008, 03:45 PM
A lot of MP3 players will store docs and pdfs too


And depending on your library systems talking book to listen to when you knit. The libraries in Maryland let you down load 4 talking books at a time for a 21 day check out. Catch up on your "reading" and knitting at the same time.

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 05:08 PM
I make an enlarged copy of the chart...and then color code the different cable sequences. Each individual cable is easier to spot, therefore fewer mistakes and mis-crossed cables...therefore...less tinking and frogging! Makes the knitting go very swiftly because your eye becomes trained to the color coding. OF COURSE, I color code the legend to match!

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3260/2822917480_c11e8e324a.jpg?v=0

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 05:14 PM
When in doubt about the length you should make the sleeves, I "mock seam" the FRONTS to the BACK...mock seam the sides a bit...and try on the garment. In this photo, you can see that the shoulders will drop off my natural shoulderline...therefore, the sleeves will be seamed there.
The designer swears that this pattern (GROVE) is not a dropped shoulder. Well it might not be a dropped shoulder technically...but it sure dropped off my shoulder. I shorted the length of the sleeves accordingly. If I hadn't, the sleeves would have hung a few inches past my middle finger!

Another tip...after I got one sleeve done, I repeated the mock seaming, and also clipped one sleeve into place...to make sure of the length of the sleeve on my arm.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3059/2822917982_56d14e89a0.jpg?v=0

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 05:20 PM
Someone previously mentioned that she uses butterfly clips for her seaming! Great idea! That reminded me of the clips that I use. (I have the KnitKlips and find them to be somewhat clunky). Having 8 granddaughters, I saw these in their hair all the time. Baby/toddler clippies. I use them to perform mock seam/try on chores, and also to hold my seams together while I'm mattress seaming pieces together.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3047/2822082181_480f6a0259.jpg?v=0

Right sides facing up, here is a sleeve of my purple bed jacket, ready to be mattress seamed into the body.

These little clippies are cheap, and you can get them at the grocery store most of the time! I like the fact that they bite into the yarn really well, without hurting the yarn. And they really really stay put while I'm trying on a garment for a fitting.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3261/2822949040_5574f18312.jpg?v=0

Indygirl
09-02-2008, 05:25 PM
Artlady, The clippies are a great idea, Thanks! :yay:

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 05:32 PM
Got junk in your trunk? No? Well I do! :teehee:

I made a cardigan a while back...and I made the size to fit my bust and shoulders. However, I always clip the FRONTS to the BACK by mock seaming...and try on the garment before knitting the sleeves. Aaaargh. I discovered that this cardigan wouldn't close in the fronts in the hip region. Yeah, the junk in my trunk needed more room. So who wants to re-knit the FRONTS and the BACK! Not me! So, I knit what I call a GUSSET. I cast on about 20 stitches...and knit the pattern to match the body...tapering the stitches out til the gusset reached the same length as the FRONTS and the BACK to the beginning of the armhole shaping. That was 98 rows. I knew that I had to decrease these 20 stitches down to one stitch from Row 1 to Row 97. I just did the math. I decreased one stitch each end of every 9th row...starting with Row 7. Anyway, you get the point. Then I seamed this gusset to the the Right Front, then to the Back. (Of course, I did the same for the Left Front-to-Back too) Here is a photo of how well it worked, and how invisible it is! It gave my cardigan the look of a swing jacket...and I like it very much! At least it now fits.

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3228/2822081507_cc26631f05.jpg?v=0

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3090/2822081223_e0edb8ecd2.jpg?v=0

Here it is, pattern called GRETA:
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3095/2823010016_2cdf9aa345.jpg?v=0

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 05:56 PM
I was on vacation last August. I was knitting a 2 skein MALABRIGO Irish Hiking Scarf for my DSIL. I got one full skein knitted, and was maybe 10 rows into the 2nd skein....when LO! and BEHOLD!....it was very obvious that the 2 skeins were very different 'dyelots'. Yeah, I know MALABRIGO is kettle dyed...but I swear, the two skeins looked identical, even in daylight. My Irish Hiking Scarf, as is, would have had an unsightly 50-yard line...half one coloration, half the other. It was a gift for a young man who is not only an artist, but a GQ dresser as well. This scarf, as is, would not do! So, rather than FROG the whole first skein...then re-knit it alternating with SKEIN #2...I just rolled up the half scarf, and pulled yardage from it as I needed it! I knit rows 1 & 2 with the Scarf Skein #1; rows 3 & 4 with Skein #2...and so forth. BTW, I made the transition from Skein #1 to Skein #2 and vice versa on the 3rd stitch in from the edge, since the edge of the scarf had to stay neat and clean.

This way of re-knitting (rather than frogging, re-winding and re-knitting) saves time, and saves wear and tear on your yarn. Especially yarns like Malabrigo, or mohair...that suffer with too much handling. As you may or may not know...the fluffy finish on Malabrigo that makes it so soft will also tangle when you frog.

Anyway, here are a couple of photos that I took in our trailer. We were on vacation in the mountains for a week, so I had all the time in the world!

On the left side is the first half of the scarf that used Skein #1. In the middle is the first few rows of the re-knit. On the right side is Skein #2.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3129/2822194323_8f596078fb.jpg?v=0

Here is the first half of the scarf that is being re-knit, alternating rows with Skein #2.
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3266/2823028078_260dabef70.jpg?v=0

And lastly, here is the re-knitted Irish Hiking Scarf!
Still needs washing and blocking, but lookin' good so far!
http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3206/2822200023_b18468bf22.jpg?v=0

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 06:06 PM
I personally want to thank ALL OF YOU for the great tips I've read! I hafta go back through again and copy/paste a bunch of them to a WORD doc for future reference! I was truly amazed at some of the great tips from our new knitters, too! Wowser! Thanks!! I'll keep my thinking cap on, and see if I can dredge up any more tips from my archives. :eyebrow:

Oh, and thanks again to Laikabear for giving my 're-knitting tip' special mention in her post #54 in this thread! Thanks Laikabear! You make me feel great! :hug:

ArtLady1981
09-02-2008, 06:20 PM
So, my 2nd Viking Knits pullover back in 2004...and it is all seamed up...and I am wearing it in fact...and I look down at my cuff...and spot a MIS-CROSSED cable! Aaargh. Being the Logical Knitter...I had to do something about it...but how? Tear apart the sweater, unseaming everything, and re-knitting the sleeve down to the cuff? I don't think so! Not today, not ever!

So being an embroiderer at one time...I thought that the lazy daisy stitch looks an awful lot like a st st. So, that is what I did! I laid a double row of lazy daisy stitches right on top of the mis-crossed cable. (I had erroneously crossed the cable to the left...and the cable was supposed to travel to the right.)

Here is a photo of the lazy daisy 'repair"! Can you tell? Me, neither.
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2112/1777448892_41aa491d0f.jpg?v=0

And here is me, wearing my 'repaired' sweater!
http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2339/1776758757_ecd51031c9.jpg?v=0

sgtpam
09-02-2008, 07:32 PM
Gorgeous! I'm going to try cables someday...they're just a little too intimidating to try yet

nephthys8
09-03-2008, 10:33 AM
Gorgeous! I'm going to try cables someday...they're just a little too intimidating to try yet.

I was scared, too, but I did my first basic cable on Monday and it is actually WAY easier than it looks. I am self-taught from a book, but if you are worried about it and know someone who can show you in person, do that. :) Also, I bought a set of 3 basic wooden straight cable needles, but I can see the appeal of the ones that are hooked on the end or bent in the middle--I bet they are easier to hold for some knitters. My LYS had a way better selection of cable needles than the chain craft stores near my house, so if you have a LYS with a good selection, check there. :) You can do it!:cheering:

suewoz
09-03-2008, 12:00 PM
Cables are pretty easy to do. I like the cable needle with the dip in the middle. I got them at the LYS. Don't remember what brand. They are a little bit more time comsuming that straight knitting but well worth it.

Love the red sweater and I sure can't see anything that indicates there ever was a mistake. Great job.

ArtLady1981
09-03-2008, 02:03 PM
My best friend, who is a longtime knitter, and I were sitting under the sun, chatting and knitting happily away!

She was working on a project which incorporated cables. I glance over and notice that she is dragging an old blue metal 8" dpn out of her what-not bag. I asked her: "What is that for?"...to which she replies: "For working my cables." I respond: "Barb, don't you have a regular cable needle like this?" To which she responds: "Never needed one". I comment: "But Barbara, a dpn is so cumbersome and it will slow you down"...to which she says: "What's wrong with slow? It works, that's all I care!" :eyebrow:

LESSON: To each his own! The dpn is what she had always used, and the dpn is what she continues to use!

She does excellent work, BTW! :cheering:

Shandeh
09-03-2008, 09:48 PM
"What's wrong with slow? It works, that's all I care!"
My sentiments exactly! :thumbsup:

People who watch me knit always say, "You know, you could knit faster if you used the Continental method". To which I reply, "I ENJOY knitting English style, and I'm not in a hurry."

There's no reason for me to RACE when I'm knitting. I want to RELAX when I knit. Plus, I like seeing each stitch form, with careful attention.

Also, I have constant pain in my arms, so I can't do Continental knitting anyway.

RuthieinMaryland
09-04-2008, 08:46 AM
Artlady! This re-knitting tip is awesome! And so is your discussion on washing/blocking! Keep those WONDERFUL tips coming - we all benefit from each other's experience.

Thanks much,
Ruthie :o)

gingerbread
09-04-2008, 09:44 AM
I know this has been said before but this is a great thread. To see all the hints are just wonderful. Yes Artlady does have great tutorials to give us. Thanks to everyone that has donated to this thread.:woot::cheering::woot:



:waving:

laikabear
09-04-2008, 11:48 AM
I actually just learned to cable withOUT a cable needle! There are a bunch of different videos and tutorials out there, but OF COURSE, I found Amy's video the most helpful. :mrgreen: (Actually a couple of the You Tube videos were doing it a different, and IMHO, way more confusing, way.)

It works best for if you are crossing only a few stitches, otherwise use a cable needle if the cable is several stitches wide. But for my Koolhaas hat, it is perfect. The video is much easier to follow than any explanation I could write out. Just remember to grab the stitches from behind for a front cross cable and from the front for a back cross cable. One thing that makes it even easier is that for the Koolhaas, I am putting in a lifeline before each cable row. It prevents me from pulling out the stitch I dropped off the needle. Once I get better at it, maybe I'll stop with the lifelines. I am addicted to them, LOL.

For my Palindrome scarf I had been using one of the metal needles with a bend in it, but I was having trouble with it sliding out when I let go. When I get back to the scarf (and I WILL!!!) I'm going to try either a wooden DPN, or the no cable needle method. :happydance:

G J
09-04-2008, 01:50 PM
My sentiments exactly! :thumbsup:

People who watch me knit always say, "You know, you could knit faster if you used the Continental method". To which I reply, "I ENJOY knitting English style, and I'm not in a hurry."

There's no reason for me to RACE when I'm knitting. I want to RELAX when I knit. Plus, I like seeing each stitch form, with careful attention.

Also, I have constant pain in my arms, so I can't do Continental knitting anyway.

Shandeh, I'm like you--knit English, but had arm pain UNTIL I learned Portuguese knitting (http://uk.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=chuanavit). It's what I do almost exclusively now b/c it doesn't require much arm movement. Look at the older videos that come up in the link. Keep watching them and then practice on a swatch or something you already have started. I find my gauge is pretty much the same with English and Portuguese, so I can swap back and forth as I need to.

I guess my TIP here for anyone, is to learn multiple ways to knit so you don't end up with repetitive stress injuries.

knit2btied
09-04-2008, 09:24 PM
I like to use a hinged throat-lozenge tin to hold darning needles and stitch markers. It rattles a bit when I use it, but it doesn't fall open or let anything slip out!

Shandeh
09-05-2008, 01:01 PM
Shandeh, I'm like you--knit English, but had arm pain UNTIL I learned Portuguese knitting (http://uk.youtube.com/profile_videos?user=chuanavit).....
Thanks so much!
By the way, I wore the poncho you gave me this week. :heart:

RuthieinMaryland
09-05-2008, 01:32 PM
Thanks so much!
By the way, I wore the poncho you gave me this week. :heart:

Hi:waving:

Thanks so much for the link to Amy's Glossary of terms. It's one of those things I "knew" about, but I'd forgotten it was there! This was a great reminder! Very thoughtful of you to include it in your post!

Ruthie :yay:

Shandeh
09-05-2008, 02:47 PM
Thanks so much for the link to Amy's Glossary of terms. It's one of those things I "knew" about, but I'd forgotten it was there! This was a great reminder! Very thoughtful of you to include it in your post!
Ruthie :yay:
You're welcome Ruthie!
I've added it to my signature, so it will show every time I post. I love that feature, and use it often. I just think we should take advantage of all the work that Amy has already done here in the forum. She's the BEST! :heart:

sgtpam
09-05-2008, 09:13 PM
My sentiments exactly! :thumbsup:

People who watch me knit always say, "You know, you could knit faster if you used the Continental method". To which I reply, "I ENJOY knitting English style, and I'm not in a hurry."

.....

I'm not giving up hope at knitting faster...but, I already knit continental...maybe I'll try that Portugal style, too.

:knitting:

MAmaDawn
09-06-2008, 08:40 AM
I use a Tic Tac container like knit2betied said about the throat lozenge tin to hold darning needles and such....

RuthieinMaryland
09-08-2008, 12:18 PM
My sentiments exactly! :thumbsup:

People who watch me knit always say, "You know, you could knit faster if you used the Continental method". To which I reply, "I ENJOY knitting English style, and I'm not in a hurry."

There's no reason for me to RACE when I'm knitting. I want to RELAX when I knit. Plus, I like seeing each stitch form, with careful attention.

Hi, Shandeh! :waving:

I wanted particularly to write and thank you for your comments above. It really gave me a boost!

I'm always looking for more efficient, and faster, ways to get projects done. I set myself a goal when I "re-discovered" knitting last year, of making afghans for each of my close family members. Right now, I'm on #8 of 9. It's been challenging, for sure, and I learned tons along the way. (KH has been particularly helpful, as has this forum.)

Maybe because the recipients of the afghans are so tickled to get one (and those still waiting are dropping BIG hints about where their afghans are!) I got a little too focused on speeding right along!

BUT, when I read your post, it put me back in touch with the true pleasures of the work. I remembered the magic of making something beautiful with what virtually amounts to sticks and "string", the magic we all call knitting!

I've been working on learning to knit socks, something that interested me and that wasn't as mammoth as an afghan. I LOVE knitting socks, but my first couple of pair weren't exactly spectacular, which I guess is to be expected in a way since I was just learning.

I'd just started my third pair of socks when I read your post and decided to really watch "each stitch form, with careful attention."

The results have been amazing! I've had trouble with the other two pairs getting them the same length at the cuff and at the sole. But having paid attention to how the stitches were forming it was possible for me to get an accurate count of rows. Now, as I'm coming down the stretch on the second sock of the pair, it's actually becoming a "twin" of the first!

And I've enjoyed the process so much, being mindful of the peace and serenity that comes with noticing all the little details and enjoying them.

Of course, I like to move right along on projects. After all, there are so many socks (hats, scarves, afghans, etc.) and so little time! Added to which, now that I'm winding up the afghans, the clan will start barking for socks next! :knitting:

But I don't think I'll ever get caught up in the "speed trap" again. Thanks for sharing that wonderful bit of wisdom! :clink:

Happy knitting,
Ruthie

cacunn
09-08-2008, 06:06 PM
My sentiments exactly! :thumbsup:

People who watch me knit always say, "You know, you could knit faster if you used the Continental method". To which I reply, "I ENJOY knitting English style, and I'm not in a hurry."

There's no reason for me to RACE when I'm knitting. I want to RELAX when I knit. Plus, I like seeing each stitch form, with careful attention.

Also, I have constant pain in my arms, so I can't do Continental knitting anyway.

If they are in a hurry they can go to Wal-Mart, If they want a hand made custom item of knit wear they can wait.

Shandeh
09-08-2008, 09:33 PM
Hi, Shandeh! :waving:
I wanted particularly to write and thank you for your comments above. It really gave me a boost!
........I'd just started my third pair of socks when I read your post and decided to really watch "each stitch form, with careful attention.".................
The results have been amazing! ..........having paid attention to how the stitches were forming it was possible for me to get an accurate count of rows..................And I've enjoyed the process so much, being mindful of the peace and serenity that comes with noticing all the little details and enjoying them.
But I don't think I'll ever get caught up in the "speed trap" again. Thanks for sharing that wonderful bit of wisdom!
cloud9 I'm glad I could help! :)
Enjoy your knitting, my friend. :muah:

If they are in a hurry they can go to Wal-Mart, If they want a hand made custom item of knit wear they can wait.
Exactly!! :woohoo:

Back when I first started knitting, my mother asked me to make her a furry scarf. So I did. She wore it to church, and all of a sudden, I had about a HUNDRED orders for furry scarves! :help:

I very quickly lost the love of furry scarves. :teehee: And I felt like I was working in a knitting factory. It was a drag. I hated every minute of it.

Someone would say, "I want a pink furry scarf with white edges" or "I want a black scarf with purple fringe, and a hat to match". I was beginning to HATE knitting.

So, I told my mother I was "no longer taking any orders". She didn't understand why I didn't want to make money with my knitting. I said, "I'm not knitting to make money. I'm knitting for the FUN of it." :)

Now, I LOVE knitting again, and I knit whatever I want!!
:thumbsup:

Lighting57
09-08-2008, 09:47 PM
I haven't read the entire thread so if my suggestion is a repeat, please over look it.

I scan my pattern and take it into WORD or WORKS. I then place spaces between each row, enlarge the text, and highlight the parts that are to be repeated between * and *. I can then check off each row as I finish it and the pattern is much easier to read.

losnana
09-09-2008, 05:48 AM
I haven't read the entire thread so if my suggestion is a repeat, please over look it.

I scan my pattern and take it into WORD or WORKS. I then place spaces between each row, enlarge the text, and highlight the parts that are to be repeated between * and *. I can then check off each row as I finish it and the pattern is much easier to read.

I'm such a dolt: I ALWAYS do this with recipes, but never thought to do it with knitting patterns!!:oops: :oops: :oops: I certainly will in the future.
Thanks for such a good tip!

cacunn
09-09-2008, 08:46 AM
I'm such a dolt: I ALWAYS do this with recipes, but never thought to do it with knitting patterns!!:oops: :oops: :oops: I certainly will in the future.
Thanks for such a good tip!


Not a dolt, busy.

We often file things based on how we first were introduced to it. As you walk through the hardware store, food store, garden shop and look at thing thing how could I use that in my needle craft? Would the "O" rings for the kitchen sink faucets work for markers? Could I take a section of PVC pipe and make a double point needle holder?

We often have so many things going that we don't stop and take a second look.

RuthieinMaryland
09-10-2008, 12:31 PM
Hi! :waving:

I knit swatches like a good little knitter should, but I read somewhere that it's not such a good idea to unravel the swatch and re-knit with the yarn.

Well, some of the sock yarns I've been buying are a bit costly and I kept feeling like I was wasting a chunk of yarn and accumulating bunches of swatches. :??

I'm probably the last person on this planet to figure out the following, and if so, please bear with me! :)

I learned to wind a center-pull ball from Amy's video and it works like a charm. Usually when I get to the end of a sock I've got yarn left over, so I just pull the yarn for the swatch from the outside of the ball. Then when I'm finished the swatch I note down the gauge and needles and unravel the swatch, wrapping it back around the outside of the ball. When I go to knit the sock I work with the new yarn from the center pull. I'm sure this would work with a skein that's already wound with a center pull.

I'd really like to hear how you all handled the swatch/yarn issue.

Thanks!
Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
09-16-2008, 07:45 AM
Hi! :waving:

Since my knitting fever has increased, I've been ordering a lot of yarn and needles, etc. and trying to get some organization for all the wondrous things coming in the door.

One thing I did was get a 3-ring binder with dividers to corral my "stuff". One section is nothing but receipts for various items. I use a three-hole punch for the large shipping sheets that come with a lot of my orders and then just pop them in the binder. You can three-hole-punch a zip-loc bag and use that for the smaller receipts.

This has come in handy a couple of times now. Once, I wanted to know how much I paid for a particular type of yarn and sure enough, there it was listed right on one of my receipts. Then I could immediately go right to the source and order more, or compare the price to another sale I saw.

Also, when I had to get a replacement for a couple of needles that were damaged and that I didn't notice right away, I could just page back and find the receipt. I called Knit Picks (they were wonderful!) and was able to give them the date and transaction number on the original purchase. A few days later the replacement needles arrived!

Now all I have to do in organize my stash! This century... :roflhard:

Happy knitting, :knitting:

Ruthie

RuthieinMaryland
09-21-2008, 10:58 PM
Hi! :waving:

Just wanted to give this thread a little bump! I'm missing all the great ideas you've all been sharing.

Ruthie :muah:

Shandeh
09-21-2008, 11:26 PM
Hi! :waving:
Just wanted to give this thread a little bump! I'm missing all the great ideas you've all been sharing.
Ruthie :muah:
I just made it a "sticky", so it will always be at the top!
:thumbsup:

RuthieinMaryland
09-22-2008, 10:37 AM
Hi! :waving:

Since I'm still learning my way around the mechanics of the site, I had no idea about putting up a sticky! Shandeh, you're great! :muah:

Thanks so much! I've enjoyed reading the hints everyone has been sending, and being able to share what I've been discovering.

This one really made my day...

I've been trying to learn to knit socks two at a time on two circulars (and I'll work on two at a time on one circ after I've untangled myself from two!).

The one thing that was so irritating about this was that the two balls of yarn had a mind of their own. I put each one in a separate zip loc bag after clipping a corner out and threading the yarn through the hole. This helped but every time I had to turn the needles I had to also flip the two bags. Being in a zip loc, too, meant that they were a bit slippery and had a tendency to fall off the sofa, etc.

Finally I took a gallon sized zip-loc bag and revved up the sewing machine. I creased the bag lengthwise down the center so I'd have a guideline then ran a row of zig-zag stitching down the center of the bag. (Straight stitch would probably just perforate the seam and weaken it, so I used the zig zag.)

You can then clip the bottom corners and thread the yarn through, or put the thread in the two compartments, draw it through the outside corners at the top and seal up only the center section. (Out the top only works if you're using a bag that doesn't have the little zipper sealer, but only the channels for sealing.)

Now when I turn the piece I only have to grab the bag by a corner and flip it over. If I flip it over the wrong way, it's simple to give it a couple more flips and I'm back on track with untangled yarn! :woohoo:

It eliminated an annoyance and distraction for me and I was able to concentrate on actually knitting the socks!

It occured to me that this would also work well on any project that requires more than one ball of yarn.

If you REALLY want to get fancy, or need more "pockets" for more colors you could stitch up something from fabric that will hold more (or bigger) skeins of yarn. But as a quick fix, the zip locks worked a treat!

Thanks again, Shandeh, for making this a stickey! :hug:

Ruthie :knitting:

Sarahc409
09-25-2008, 09:57 AM
My tip is: How to get rid of the bump of color when you are knitting a ribbed pattern and you have to change colors.
For example: if you are making ribbed socks with stripes and you want your trasition to be smoothly without the bump of the other color.
Solution: I simply always knit the first row of the new color and on the second row and all the other rows I continue with my rib pattern (ie; kk pp kk pp)

Hope I was able to be clear enough :-P

Sarah

DeeJay
10-04-2008, 07:25 AM
I have the attention span of a flea, but decided to try a shawl...
It was fun in the beginning, since I was using it to practice increasing, but I grew sick of it as it got bigger. So I went shopping for some nice yarn for a scarf. Now when I get sick of my bigger project, I just put it down, knit a bit (or a lot) of a scarf. After feeling like I've accomplished something, it's easier to pick up the bigger project.

The other thing I've done is found a large(er) material bag and put all supplies I'll be needing for the project in it. I'm starting a top that uses two different needle sizes and needs safty pins, so those plus all the yarn needed for it, a notepad and pen (for keeping track of rows) and a printout of the pattern are in that bag. Means I wont be picking up that yarn or those needles for something else just to discover that I needed them.

I bought more moisteriser the other day, I had also bought my first safty pins and wool needles. I had no where to put the pins and needles though that would stop me from loosing 90% of them. Then I looked at the moisteriser box. Out came a large roll of masking tape to tape up the bottom of the box and in went the pins and needles (still in their plastic holder). Now I dont have to worry about losing so many.
I should do the same thing with my hairties... next time I get a box :)

DorothyDot
10-05-2008, 06:45 PM
Cables are pretty easy to do. I like the cable needle with the dip in the middle. I got them at the LYS. Don't remember what brand. They are a little bit more time comsuming that straight knitting but well worth it.

Love the red sweater and I sure can't see anything that indicates there ever was a mistake. Great job.

My favorite cable needle is... [drum-roll] a bent bobby-pin. No kidding! You can loop it through your work to keep it always handy because it has that dip in the middle; you put your cable stitches onto it via the wavy-bent tip, then knit those stitches off the smooth side - no worry about twisting!

And if you lose it or one of those end-cushionomg thingys come off, you just... grab another bobby pin and spread it open!

Best of all is the price. :happydance:

Hope this helps,
Dot

RuthieinMaryland
10-06-2008, 11:53 PM
Dot! That's got to be one of the best ever tips! I'm rooting around for bobby pins now!

Thanks!

Ruthie

cacunn
10-08-2008, 11:45 AM
Legal disclaimer - I've only been knitting a little bit, however, I read a lot and take ideas and put them together.

A. To minimize ladders it is not the first stitch after the move from one needle to another, it is the second and third. The first stitch after going from one needle to another 1) doesn't have enough tension to prevent ladders 2) the needle with that first stitch has to much movement to make a tight stitch.

Knit the first stitch, begin knitting the second stitch and as you start to pull the new stitch through the loop pull on the yarn until you see the first stitch pull tight. Do this with the third stitch, on the fourth stitch begin knitting normally.

B. If you pattern will allow - rotate the point where you pass from one needle to another every so many rounds. For example. assuming the use of 4 DPs. Needle 1 has stitches 1 to 10, needle 2 has stitches 11 to 20 and needle 3 has stitches 21 to 30.
For the first four rounds knit the stitches on the needle as above. On round 5 knit stitches 1 to 10, when you come to stitches 11 and 12 knit them on to needle 1. Then move to needle 2 and knit stitches 13 to 20 and then knit stitches 21 and 22 on to needle 2. Move to needle 3 and knit stitches 23 to 30 and then knit stitches 1 and 2 onto needle 3.

Depending on your pattern you may want to put markers Between stitches 10 and 11, 20 and 21, and 30 and 1.

Jackie Lim
10-12-2008, 12:33 AM
While knitting in round, i join new and old yarn together by tying a knot and then knit with the new yarn - i really dont like it as there is always a bump/knot there and that stitch seems to be smaller/tighter than the rest. Is a sore-eye to me!!

Would love to hear and learn new trick to this, thanks.

RuthieinMaryland
10-12-2008, 08:24 AM
While knitting in round, i join new and old yarn together by tying a knot and then knit with the new yarn - i really dont like it as there is always a bump/knot there and that stitch seems to be smaller/tighter than the rest. Is a sore-eye to me!!

Would love to hear and learn new trick to this, thanks.

Hi, Jackie! :waving:

One way to deal with this "knotty" problem is to knit almost to the end of the old yarn, leaving a tail of about 5 or 6 inches. Tie the new yarn, in a knot, around the strand of the old yarn and also leave a 5 or 6 inch tail on this. Slide the new yarn all the way up the old yarn strand so that you can pick up the next stitch with it. Continue knitting. When you're finished, pick the little knot apart and then weave in both tails as you normally would.

In the KH forum, there are some super great videos on different ways to join new yarn. Check them out and see if you can find your favorite!

Happy knitting,

Ruthie :hug:

ecb
10-12-2008, 07:01 PM
Stitch Markers, Stitch Markers, Stitch Markers .... I use them for even the smallest repeat or to remind me to knit the two or three stitches at the edge of a dish cloth. Even if a pattern only has 4 or five stitches in it, I know immediately if I have made a mistake.
My favorite stitch markers are jump rings. I get them in the jewelry making area of the craft store. They come in all sizes, they are inexpensive (so you don't feel like you have to search for a lost one) and you get a whole bunch of them.
Also, I use the larger ones to count rows
I keep a section of the round with the number of rows between increases/decreases, each round when i get to the first marker, i knit to the moving one, when I get to it, i ignore it and knit the stitch behind it and pick it up again with that stitch (it moved over one space) when it gets to the end, it is time to do the increases. I hope some of your brains around this, its hard, but I know U R a lot smarter than I am.

Also, i make my own, using metal needles as a size guide. Then I have plenty. I only use the plastic ones for counting.

Arielluria
10-13-2008, 12:05 PM
While knitting in round, i join new and old yarn together by tying a knot and then knit with the new yarn - i really dont like it as there is always a bump/knot there and that stitch seems to be smaller/tighter than the rest. Is a sore-eye to me!!

Would love to hear and learn new trick to this, thanks.I knit that first stitch (when joining the first row in the round) with the C.O. tail and then take over with the yarn itself starting on stitch 2 of join. You have to tighten that first stitch only while you knit the 2nd row, but then it stays tight.

No knots!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

ecb
10-14-2008, 05:21 PM
I have found that slipping the first stitch can be done a variety of ways
Garter stitch
yarn back, then slip as to purl makes a tight clove-hitch type knot at the edge
slip as to purl THEN yarn back makes a nice neat edge like in stockinette
I felt VERY clever when I figured this out

ecb

diny0
10-16-2008, 09:44 PM
I have found a digital kitchen scale to be a nifty help with knitting. I first used it to split skeins of sock yarn equally so I could knit 2 socks at a time. I set the scale to grams and then put a bowl on the scale and zero it. I weigh the whole skein of yarn and figure out what weight I need for a single ball. I hand wind my balls so I just put the ball in the bowl every once in a while until I have the weight I need. I cut the yarn and then wind the second ball.

My other use for the scale was figuring out if I had enough yarn to finish a shawl. I needed to do eight rows and knew I could do at least 4 with the yarn I had left. After the second row I weighed the yarn I had left. I knit one row and weighed the yarn again. I figured I had enough yarn to do the next six rows. I was still increasing so I measured the weight of the yarn after each row I knit. I finished the shawl with about eight inches of yarn to spare.

losnana
10-17-2008, 07:08 AM
I do the exact same thing! In fact ,I used a Christmas gift certificate from a kitchen store to get my scale last year. Maybe one day I'll use it for food, but so far it's a yarn scale!

I have found a digital kitchen scale to be a nifty help with knitting. I first used it to split skeins of sock yarn equally so I could knit 2 socks at a time. I set the scale to grams and then put a bowl on the scale and zero it. I weigh the whole skein of yarn and figure out what weight I need for a single ball. I hand wind my balls so I just put the ball in the bowl very once in a while until I have the weight I need. I cut the yarn and then wind the second ball.

My other use for the scale was figuring out if I had enough yarn to finish a shawl. I needed to do eight rows and knew I could do at least 4 with the yarn I had left. After the second row I weighed the yarn I had left. I knit one row and weighed the yarn again. I figured I had enough yarn to do the next six rows. I was still increasing so I measured the weight of the yarn after each row I knit. I finished the shawl with about eight inches of yarn to spare.

cacunn
10-17-2008, 07:35 AM
I have found a digital kitchen scale to be a nifty help with knitting.


I was at Bass Pro Shops and saw a fishing line counter (http://www.basspro.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/Product_10151_-1_10001_36569____SearchResults) and the light went off that this could be used to count the yardage left in yarn spools.

http://image.basspro.com/images/images2/58500/58999.jpg
They have two versions one is electronic ~ $12 US and a this one which is mechanical ~ $13US. I like the mechanical because I find batteries always run out just when I need them.

One day I'm going to mount it on some thing nice, however, while waiting for that "one day" I use the handle of a coffee cup.

CountryNaturals
10-23-2008, 07:13 PM
I use earrings as stitch markers. :) My favorite one is a continuous hoop but I'll use anything hoopy. I don't wear earrings anymore so it's nice to get some use out of them!
I bought a toe ring at a craft show about 25 years ago. I haven't worn it in years, but I dug it out for a stitch marker. Makes me feel like hot stuff, having a Real Gold stitch marker.:cool: It also brings back great memories of The Sawdust Festival.

CountryNaturals
10-23-2008, 08:25 PM
When I have to attach a new skein in the middle of a job, I use a square knot, so both ends lie flat (one before the knot -- the other one after the knot--and the knot is flat, too). I leave about a 1-2" tail on each piece, then knit the first tail in as I go, working across the knot, then working the 2nd tail in after the knot. (I hope this makes sense.) The result is NO TAILS TO WORK IN LATER, which is one of the few things I don't like about knitting. ;) ;)

Shandeh
10-24-2008, 11:34 AM
I bought a toe ring at a craft show about 25 years ago. I haven't worn it in years, but I dug it out for a stitch marker. Makes me feel like hot stuff, having a Real Gold stitch marker.:cool:
I used my wedding band once. :teehee:

CountryNaturals
10-24-2008, 12:19 PM
I used my wedding band once. :teehee:
LOL! I hope the project was a gift for Hubby. ;)

Shandeh
10-24-2008, 12:40 PM
:heart: :hug: :heart:

Dianeadae
10-29-2008, 08:41 AM
This is such a helpful post! Thank you all.

I am about to knit my first lace scarf (in between knitting an afghan), and appreciate all the tips here. I have no extra tips to add yet, but hope to soon.

cacunn
10-30-2008, 11:45 AM
I seem to do more knitting away from home then at home, lunch at work, riding the metro etc., so I carry a lot of odds and ends. Once of my favorite odd or maybe end is a thread puller/nit picker from my sewing knit. This is the little latch hook devise used to pull snagged threads to the back side of fabric or clothing. I has a cover to protect the hook and extend the handle when in use. If I drop a stitch while out I pull out my nit picked and reach through the last loop and pull the yarn back through. Since it is small and light weight it is a great addition to my knitting bag.

Also, I normally use two circular needles to knit socks but while at my LYS I saw some DPs on sale. I picked them up to try. Got back to work with time to knit and replaced the circular needles with DPs. When I started to pack up my knitting I was concerned about the needles falling out of the stitches. Looking around I saw two old dried up markers that I had just thrown out. the caps looked like just the right size to go around the needle points. I cleaned the caps and then taped a rubber band around the ends of the two caps. I now have a DP needle holder that I'm not afraid to lose.

cacunn
10-30-2008, 12:33 PM
As I said in the post above I do a lot of KIP(K) (knitting in Public - frequently Kilted) and carry a lot of odds and ends but often it in not easy or easy to pull out what I need. One item is the tape measure to see where I am. Therefore I have taken a set of knitting measurement:

base of palm to tip of longest finger = 8 inches
hand side to side at base of fingers = 3.25 inches
longest finger - 3.5 inches
tip of thumb to tip of pinky fnger ( stretched ) = 9.25 inches.

These are not exact, but what I'm looking for is a gauge to tell me when to pull out the tape measure. If the foot of my sock is 9 1/2 inches before I start the gusset then I don't have to worry about the tape measure until I reach from the tip of my thumb to about 1/2 the way up my pinky finger.

I find that it is easy to forget my tape measure but it is not easy to knit if I have left my hand at home.

klymyshyn
11-07-2008, 11:16 AM
When joining a second color:
Do not knot the new yarn but leave a tail so the first stitch won't pull out, you may then adjust the tension of the first few (new color sts.) later. Also, when knotting these (for finishing) if your yarn is strong enough: untwist the tail (to be knotted) into (2) 2 ply strands, pull one of these through the nearest st and tie the 2 plies tog. for a bulk free knot!

klymyshyn
11-07-2008, 11:30 AM
When knitting a seamed item such as a sweater I like to reduce knots wherever possible ('cause I don't like having to hide them!) - by leaving a tail long enough to work the side seams before casting on a sweater bottom; also before the wrist rib on a sleeve.

daniellecool2003
12-11-2008, 07:09 PM
I Just a beginner knitter and one problem i kept coming across was a tightness in my casting on which made it very hard for me to knit the first row. As once i start knitting my knitting is fairly good and not as tight. I found a solution to that though. What i do know is place two kneedles together as im casting on and then remove one needle once i have all the stitches i need. It made things so much easier. i recommend it to any new knitters who have a very tight casting on. It works wonders. :balloons:

Arielluria
12-11-2008, 07:25 PM
That IS a great tip! :woot:

Marria
12-11-2008, 07:43 PM
I Just a beginner knitter and one problem i kept coming across was a tightness in my casting on which made it very hard for me to knit the first row. As once i start knitting my knitting is fairly good and not as tight. I found a solution to that though. What i do know is place two kneedles together as im casting on and then remove one needle once i have all the stitches i need. It made things so much easier. i recommend it to any new knitters who have a very tight casting on. It works wonders. :balloons:
That is a great idea! Another trick I've used, because I still tend to cast on too tightly is that I use a needle one or two sizes larger to cast on my stitches and then just begin knitting with the needle size I am actually going to use for my pattern.

Arielluria
12-11-2008, 07:56 PM
The cable cast on is also good, I almost exclusively use that for my socks especially.

Indygirl
12-11-2008, 09:17 PM
That is a great idea! Another trick I've used, because I still tend to cast on too tightly is that I use a needle one or two sizes larger to cast on my stitches and then just begin knitting with the needle size I am actually going to use for my pattern.
This is a great one. I am also a tight knitter, so I use this trick also.

Kibben
12-17-2008, 04:33 AM
I solved that problem of 2 "equal sides" as well as with the sleeves....I use two sets of needles and yarn and work at least 10 rows of the left side, then work 10 rows of the right side. If I have a detailed pattern, I will complete the pattern before moving on to the next side. Sometimes I use a counter.

G J
12-17-2008, 08:39 AM
I do this, but do both sleeves on the same needles. The only drawback is that if I mess up, I have to frog two sleeves.

Kibben
12-19-2008, 03:33 PM
I use two separate sets of needles & yarn. If you mess up on one set, you will not make the same mistake on the other set.
Go slow, speed comes with experience. Also talk to yourself i.e.k1, p1, yo, etc. This registers with your brain which sends the message to your fingers. (This method is a scientific fact & I use it to tutor music which helps to get the rhythm in the hands & aids the memorization process.) If you cannot afford the Knitting Help CD, an excellent source of technique info, then try the YouTube.com and search "knitting tech". Hope this helps.

Marria
12-26-2008, 01:47 PM
I think most of us eagerly run to the patterns whenever Knitty puts out a new issue, but lately I've been going back and reading some of their technique articles, and there is some really good stuff there!

One I think is especially good is Jenna Wilson's article on gauge (http://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer05/FEATsum05TBP.html). Wish I could have read that when I was first learning and didn't get the concept of how important it is...otherwise I might not have ended up with the giant oversized sweater of doom that still lurks in my closet somewhere. :teehee:

RuthieinMaryland
12-27-2008, 11:24 AM
I think most of us eagerly run to the patterns whenever Knitty puts out a new issue, but lately I've been going back and reading some of their technique articles, and there is some really good stuff there!

One I think is especially good is Jenna Wilson's article on gauge (http://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer05/FEATsum05TBP.html). Wish I could have read that when I was first learning and didn't get the concept of how important it is...otherwise I might not have ended up with the giant oversized sweater of doom that still lurks in my closet somewhere. :teehee:

Hi, Marria! :waving:

WHAT an article! Thanks for posting this. My eyes have practically crossed reading it :roflhard: but I can honestly say I'm enlightened! This is a GREAT article and I definitely plan to go into it again much more thoroughly.

Although I always understood, reluctantly, the importance of swatching, and did it, I had no idea of the intricacies involved that are explained in this article.

This is a great piece of work and I appreciate your generosity in sharing it! :thumbsup:

Happy knitting (and swatching!) :yay:

Ruthie :knitting:

kaicee
12-30-2008, 10:02 PM
I regularly visit goodwill and other thrift stores to find small open straw bags. I put each project that I have going into them as well as a copy of my pattern. They usually have inside pockets too. I only buy ones that have a flat bottom to they stand up on their won. And, I pay less than $5 per bag. So, when I need to grab something to knit on the go I have everything I need for the project in a cute bag I can grab and toss into the car!

I also use a small magnetic dry erase board to keep a row count and pattern info on certain projects.

Marria
12-31-2008, 11:57 PM
I like to use charts in knitting, but sometimes I will find a pattern with many lines to the repeat that isn't charted, and I worry about making a mistake if I were to chart it myself. But on the other hand, when the pattern repeat has, say for example 24 rows, it's really easy to get off track and make a mistake. To avoid this, I started using index cards and a little ring (sort of like the ones that are in a 3 ring binder, except they are just individual rings). A rubber band will work too.

Then, I write one individual line along with what line number it is on one card for each line. I punch a hole in the corner, put them on the ring or rubber band in the proper order, and then just flip the card each time I finish a row. This really helps to prevent getting on the wrong row. Also, if I have to stop on a particular row before the pattern is done, I just put a post-it on the card I stopped with and write the date on it. Easy peasy!

(Note--if I am doing a lace pattern where all the even rows are purled across, then I leave the even rows out.)

momwolf
01-04-2009, 01:52 PM
I made some row counters and someone thought I should put in the Tips. So here they are and how to use them


When you start knitting row 1 knit to the middle of the row and then put the first loop on your needle( this tells you you are knitting row 1) then knit to end of row. Knit back across and when you get to the loop slip it back to your other needle BUT put it on the second loop (now you are on row 2).Just keep slipping the loop to the next loop every time you come to it. Hope this makes sense:eyes:
__________________

Indygirl
01-04-2009, 02:14 PM
I made some row counters and someone thought I should put in the Tips. So here they are and how to use them


When you start knitting row 1 knit to the middle of the row and then put the first loop on your needle( this tells you you are knitting row 1) then knit to end of row. Knit back across and when you get to the loop slip it back to your other needle BUT put it on the second loop (now you are on row 2).Just keep slipping the loop to the next loop every time you come to it. Hope this makes sense:eyes:
__________________Yes, That makes complete sence :thumbsup:

cacunn
01-04-2009, 02:41 PM
I made some row counters and someone thought I should put in the Tips. So here they are and how to use them



Momwolf - they do look nice. Being a guy I'm not quite into the bling, do not read this as a negative just different style. I do have some type of dangle at one end to show where the count starts I use split rings interlocked into each other. Quick simple and easy to redo if I need different counts.

I have many with one ring to show a change in pattern, two rings for 1 row increase/decrease row and plain row patterns, three rings for 1 row increase/decrease row and 2 plain row patterns.
I have a five ring but normally use the 10 ring change. On the 10 ring counter the 5th and 10th rings are different color to make it easy to see when I am have way there.

I will say that after seeing Momwolf's fine example I may have to add some bling to my counters.

beau303fold132
01-07-2009, 12:54 AM
I have been knitting for 21 years now, and I still come across stuff that seems sooo simple. Forinstance, joining yarn. I recently learned that when you run out, you don't tie a knot on the wrong side of your work...ha ha. I had no idea. I learned that on a 4 ply worsted or sport weight, unravel 2 strands of the old and the new and cut the 2 strands of of each. You can loop the old yarn with the new and rub it back and forth on your jeans to felt the two together...you can't even tell the difference, and you don't have that uncomfortable knot on the wrong side of your work! That was my duh moment.

Jan in CA
01-09-2009, 12:59 PM
I have been knitting for 21 years now, and I still come across stuff that seems sooo simple. Forinstance, joining yarn. I recently learned that when you run out, you don't tie a knot on the wrong side of your work...ha ha. I had no idea. I learned that on a 4 ply worsted or sport weight, unravel 2 strands of the old and the new and cut the 2 strands of of each. You can loop the old yarn with the new and rub it back and forth on your jeans to felt the two together...you can't even tell the difference, and you don't have that uncomfortable knot on the wrong side of your work! That was my duh moment.

Just to add...This only works with wool and other animal fibers. Superwash wool won't work either. ;)

Shandeh
01-10-2009, 06:09 PM
Thanks Jan! I was going to say the same thing.

Marria
01-11-2009, 02:38 PM
I've recently learned to use duplicate stitch for weaving in ends, and I love it! The weaving in doesn't show at all. You can do this on reverse stockinette and garter stitch as well as on stockinette. The article that taught me how to do this is here:

http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall04/FEATfall04TT.html

Check it out. You may never want to weave any other way again!

outdoordrea
01-15-2009, 02:41 PM
I've recently learned to use duplicate stitch for weaving in ends, and I love it! The weaving in doesn't show at all. You can do this on reverse stockinette and garter stitch as well as on stockinette. The article that taught me how to do this is here:

http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall04/FEATfall04TT.html

Check it out. You may never want to weave any other way again!
Thank you so much for this link. Weaving in ends is one of my top three things about knitting that I don't like to do (even though it's a necessity). Now I might like it because I know how to make it more secure.

DebbieJ
01-17-2009, 03:48 PM
I had trouble knitting with circular needles because of the twisted cables between the needles. What I did was to heat water on the stove and dip the cable into the hot water and then hung it over the curtain rod in the kitchen. This straightened them out. They now hang over my fireplace tools. They stay straight and are so easy to use.

DebbieJ

Fee
01-19-2009, 02:47 PM
So many ideas to choose from! I love the idea of using ziplocs and having something written to show where I left off-I've undone many a project after leaving it too long! Well time to get back to my latest piece of knitting, again, something I started and have had to start again!

Marria
01-21-2009, 05:13 AM
Thank you so much for this link. Weaving in ends is one of my top three things about knitting that I don't like to do (even though it's a necessity). Now I might like it because I know how to make it more secure.


It is a lot more secure I've found. The only trouble I've run into--I used to weave my ends in as I go, but now I'm leaving them to the end, because once I do it this way, I can't find them if I need to frog! :teehee:

Debkcs
01-24-2009, 01:47 AM
Marria, finally! I've never been able to figure out why folks do it any other way. But you are right, do it after unless you really want to frustrate yourself.

cacunn
01-24-2009, 07:09 PM
It is a lot more secure I've found. The only trouble I've run into--I used to weave my ends in as I go, but now I'm leaving them to the end, because once I do it this way, I can't find them if I need to frog! :teehee:

Marria could you leave a marker of contrasting colored yarn at the point you weave in the ends? If you have to frog - frog to the marker. Once you are finished you remover the markers.

Marria
02-08-2009, 12:39 PM
This is on Vogue Knitting's website.

A to Z and Beyond the Basics (http://www.vogueknitting.com/node/81)

This has a lot of the same information that is in Vogue Knitting: The Ultimate Knitting Book. I think the illustrations are particularly good on this site.

GrandmaLori
02-08-2009, 01:26 PM
This idea seemed to really work nicely-what do you think?
So..I hope I can explain this without going in circles...You know when you are doing a garment in the round, from the top down, and you separate to make armholes. At the bottom of the armhole you usually cast on a few stitches to each side and then re-join to knit the body in the round. The problem here is that there is a small hole at the first and last newly cast-on stitch. (At least for me).

This time, at each armhole, I cast on 2 more than the pattern said to, and worked my way on around. When I came to those newly cast-on stitches on the next row, I knit 2 tog with the with the last original stitch and the first cast on, and the last cast on and the first original stitch at the other end of the armhole.

Can anyone see what I'm saying here? It left me with an underarm without holes.
__________________
3 grandbabies:woohoo:

Marria
02-08-2009, 01:28 PM
Marria could you leave a marker of contrasting colored yarn at the point you weave in the ends? If you have to frog - frog to the marker. Once you are finished you remover the markers.

Great idea!

LalaBee
02-27-2009, 12:25 AM
When I decided to knit my first sweater, I just couldn't knit something simple - no way! That would be just too easy! I had to knit an aran sweater with cables galore! Needless to say, I got lost pretty quickly and had to go to the LYS to get some major help. One of the suggestions I was given is something I still do today if I am knitting something that has a pattern block in it such as cable work. I use stitch markers to mark the beginning and end of the area that is complicated. That way I know exactly where I am in the pattern and there is less room for mistakes such as forgetting a stitch in the pattern or beginning the pattern a stitch later. I find it really helpful as it means I don't have to guess so much where I am and I don't need to frog as much and guess what the mess is supposed to be!

PoQaL
02-27-2009, 09:52 AM
After a long hiatus from knitting, I am getting reacquainted with this craft. After knitting several scarves I was ready to progress and attempt something more challenging. When a friend recently announced that she is pregnant I decided to try my hand at making the Diamond and Lace blanket by Bernat. Thanks for the tips on keeping track of a pattern and working with lace. Im sure they will be a big help and thank you very much for this forum.

My addition Always use a yarn winder [New Wool Winder by Royal] and keep each skein in a knee high stocking.

Arielluria
02-27-2009, 11:03 AM
One of the suggestions I was given is something I still do today if I am knitting something that has a pattern block in it such as cable work. I use stitch markers to mark the beginning and end of the area that is complicated. That way I know exactly where I am in the pattern and there is less room for mistakes such as forgetting a stitch in the pattern or beginning the pattern a stitch later. I find it really helpful as it means I don't have to guess so much where I am and I don't need to frog as much and guess what the mess is supposed to be! What I also do for aran type projects, if all cables aren't on same row repeat (i.e. one might be every 8 rows, another on 6 rows and the others every 10 rows), is I place a stitch market for each cable at the beginning of the work, that way I know EXACTLY where I am on each cable at all times.

cacunn
02-27-2009, 05:22 PM
What I also do for aran type projects, if all cables aren't on same row repeat (i.e. one might be every 8 rows, another on 6 rows and the others every 10 rows), is I place a stitch market for each cable at the beginning of the work, that way I know EXACTLY where I am on each cable at all times.


I picked up a package of split rings at one of the craft stores in both silver and gold. If I have a pattern repeat every 6 rows I interlock 6 split rings. I have something, a bead or some kind of dangle, that say this is the beginning, and a different color ring for the fifth ring. Each round I advance a ring and when I come to the end I cable or do what ever the pattern requires.

This allows me to put the piece down and know how many rounds/rows till the pattern action.

WaywardStitch
03-04-2009, 05:09 AM
Did you know you could steam iron the cord on your circulars?

I was getting really frustrated while trying to unkink my circular needles. I have several sizes of the 29" bamboo type circulars. I tried running hot water over them while stretching them. And I tried steaming them over a kettle. That gave only a slight improvement, but mostly it just got my fingers burnt. Ouch! Finally after steam-blocking a swatch one evening I went to bed, and while dozing off it occurred to me that I could probably also steam/iron the cord of my circulars.

The next morning I wet a washcloth and folded it into a thick wad. I put one end of the circular cord in the middle of the wad with the bamboo part sticking out. I placed the iron on top of the washcloth wad, then grabbed the bamboo end and slowly pulled the cord through while holding the iron on top. It worked great! In no time the cord was straight and my fingers weren't burnt. I was so excited I immediately ironed all the rest my circulars. I'm really amazed how easy this was, and how fast. It has solved all my kinking problems. And if the circulars revert back to kinkiness from being rolled up in my knitting bag, I just iron them again, ha!

It may seem like a small thing, but I was so happy to figure this out that I acted just like this little guy ==> :woot:

Indygirl
03-04-2009, 08:40 AM
Did you know you could steam iron the cord on your circulars?

I was getting really frustrated while trying to unkink my circular needles. I have several sizes of the 29" bamboo type circulars. I tried running hot water over them while stretching them. And I tried steaming them over a kettle. That gave only a slight improvement, but mostly it just got my fingers burnt. Ouch! Finally after steam-blocking a swatch one evening I went to bed, and while dozing off it occurred to me that I could probably also steam/iron the cord of my circulars.

The next morning I wet a washcloth and folded it into a thick wad. I put one end of the circular cord in the middle of the wad with the bamboo part sticking out. I placed the iron on top of the washcloth wad, then grabbed the bamboo end and slowly pulled the cord through while holding the iron on top. It worked great! In no time the cord was straight and my fingers weren't burnt. I was so excited I immediately ironed all the rest my circulars. I'm really amazed how easy this was, and how fast. It has solved all my kinking problems. And if the circulars revert back to kinkiness from being rolled up in my knitting bag, I just iron them again, ha!

It may seem like a small thing, but I was so happy to figure this out that I acted just like this little guy ==> :woot: This is a great idea! Thanks for the tip.

Shandeh
03-05-2009, 10:25 PM
There is another quick way to loosen up the cord on circular needles. I just use a blow dryer on the high setting. I put the circular needles on the bathroom counter, and blow the hair dryer very close to the cord. It unkinks itself as you blow it....you don't even have to stretch it out.....it just slowly unfolds.

I usually pick up the needle and give it a good stretch anyway when I turn off the hair dryer. It works very well for me.

salevy
03-08-2009, 04:28 PM
When I have more than one pattern in an afghan such as I do now for 2 blankets, I use index cards for each pattern. I write one row on each card. Makes it easier to pick it up the next time.

I use markers between each pattern. This way if there's a problem with the pattern, I know it at the end of the pattern and not the end of the row.

Shari

Hogheaven59
03-24-2009, 10:06 AM
One of the best tips I have...(I did a happy dance when I came up with this, and continue to do a mental happy dance as it just takes too long to do the actual dance while knitting). Put the yarn you are working with in a plastic grocery bag(or bag with handles), and if or when it twists up...either on itself, or if you are working with two strands and they twist around each other, take the project you are working on, and hold it up with one hand, take the bag in the other with your pointer finger holding the bag lower to the ground, and twirl the bag around and around. I twirl the bag clockwise as that is how the yarn untwists for me when knitting with double strands. The yarn strand(s) will wind around the top of the bag...just under your finger. When it winds up to the point you don't have any more room to wind or you feel its been enough spins, drop the bag, and gently pull up on the yarn strand and it will come off the bag top, and it should be untwisted. Repeat as needed. I hope this helps, and I hope there will be a lot of happy dances out there!

Arielluria
03-24-2009, 04:18 PM
This is great, I do it too. Especially helpful when working with 2 strands so they don't constantly twirl around each other.

OffJumpsJack
03-26-2009, 03:33 PM
One of the best tips I have.... Put the yarn you are working with in a plastic grocery bag(or bag with handles), and if or when it twists up..., take the project you are working on, and hold it up with one hand, take the bag in the other with your pointer finger holding the bag lower to the ground, and twirl the bag around and around.

I just did that, but after a few tries I realized I needed to spin it counter clockwise. :think:

I use a canvas bag, and I'm planning to try some modifications on it.

1) Put an oval piece of wood in the bottom as a base so it will stand up.

2) Run a seam down the middle from top to bottom to divide it into two "tubes." I can then put one skein up in each side.

laikabear
03-26-2009, 08:12 PM
I am a very tight knitter and when working stockinette in the round I have trouble sliding the stitches on the left needle. I have found that just using a tip one size smaller on the left needle makes it easier to keep things moving, and it doesn't affect my gauge since the right hand needle forms the stitches.

On the other hand, when working stockinette back and forth, my gauge with purling is looser, so if I am having a big discrepancy, I will put different sized tips on my needles in order to use a larger one for the knit side and a smaller one for the purl side. I guess these only work with interchangeables - love my Options!

I am trying to tighten up my purl stitches to match, but with some yarns the difference is more obvious. Also, when I get tired or stop actively thinking about it, the purl stitches get looser again.

PS - Jack did you go to NCSU? I went to vet school there (Carolina for undergrad)! :)

Hogheaven59
03-27-2009, 10:15 AM
I just did that, but after a few tries I realized I needed to spin it counter clockwise. :think:

I use a canvas bag, and I'm planning to try some modifications on it.

1) Put an oval piece of wood in the bottom as a base so it will stand up.

2) Run a seam down the middle from top to bottom to divide it into two "tubes." I can then put one skein up in each side.

Great idea!
I was thinking...:think: the Quaker Oats tubular can would hold a skein of yarn, you could cut a thin strip from the edge to the center of the lid for the yarn to go through. You could make two for two skeins. I suppose you could even spiff 'em up with contact paper...hmm...I think I might try this...oatmeal anyone? :wink:

Hogheaven59
03-27-2009, 12:20 PM
Great idea!
I was thinking...:think: the Quaker Oats tubular can would hold a skein of yarn, you could cut a thin strip from the edge to the center of the lid for the yarn to go through. You could make two for two skeins. I suppose you could even spiff 'em up with contact paper...hmm...I think I might try this...oatmeal anyone? :wink:

Another thought...put your knitting bag...container...on a lazy susan, and twirl it around as you go. (this would work at home as you wouldn't want to be carting that lazy ol' susan around) :wink:

GrandmaLori
03-29-2009, 03:30 PM
We went on a trip, and I FORGOT my knitting. So, off to Wally to get needles and some redheart yarn. I have a slipper request, and pattern memorized. It uses 2 colors, 4 strands. How to keep untangled....Voila, the walmart bag!. I put all 4 skeins in, then 2 strands out through each of the 2 handle holes, and my project on the outside of the bag. Then, I tied the 2 handles together right up at the top and everything is nicely contained. I put the bag inside a 2nd bag, which conains the actual project. It really works! Nothing flopping around on the floor etc.

cacunn
04-08-2009, 02:00 PM
Take your Quaker Oats tubular can and cut it so it is a little taller than your yarn ball. Punch a hole in the top and one on each side of the can. Put a piece of cord from the outside to inside and knot it on each side of the can for a handle. Put your yarn in the can, thread the yarn through the hole in the top and put the handle over your wrist for a knit and carry container.

G J
04-08-2009, 04:19 PM
This is a tip I learned the hard way!
When you have to frog part of a garment and re-knit after you already blocked, frog, and use NEW yarn OR put your yarn in hanks and wet it down and let it hang with a weight on it.

I learned this while trying to get the size right for a sweater I'm making for my MIL who is very fussy about fit. So my next tip is:
Don't offer to knit a sweater for a picky MIL!:roflhard:

victoryah
04-09-2009, 03:21 AM
First, when i am working a pattern that i am not making up from the top of my head (which happens alot when i crochet, i am new to knitting), i have the pattern put on a zip drive for my laptop. then i can have instant access at anytime. I get migraines from light sources (house lamps, car headlights, computer screens, etc), so i have low level lights in the house. but i can back highlight the lettering on the patterns (make the background black and the letters white) and have less problems, therefore able to do more work. other things about using a laptop for patterns is i can highlight special instructions or repeats, increase fonts when the pattern is very small, etc. plus it cuts out the paperwork and clutter in the livingroom! i keep hard copies in storage somewhere, but since i have backups for the computer, i never need them.

as someone said earlier, i also use the 1 and 2 gallon size zip loc bags for projects or even for storing yarn. i have pets and even tho they are supposed to not get near my projects, they are pets! i keep lint removers nearby and also lint-free cloths (towels) so if i am working on something for a baby or someone outside of family the items are never in contact with animal dander. boy do my cats love baby items! :teehee:

i keep all buttons and decorations in a small tackle box, boxes sold in the craft section are too expensive!

i mark rounds with small (1/4 inch) remnants of yarn. everyone has snippets around!

victoryah

victoryah
04-09-2009, 03:27 AM
... forgot one thing.... i am into recyling... like everyone else!!! back to the kitties!!!! lots n lots of litter!!! i use the plastic pails the litter comes in for storing yarn in or my current projects. is tall enough to hold the tallest of knitting needles. some of the containers have nice lids that fit back easily on. i cover with a piece of material i have sewn and put elastic in the top and bottom so it fits over it... no one can see that it is a kitty litter box!

the boxes stack perfectly on top of each other for storage, as well....

allynealy
04-09-2009, 06:11 AM
I haven't read this whole thread, but I think this is a good idea. One of my friends had bought this plastic container to hold yarn. I took an old Folgers can (the big one) and cut a hole in the top. I really like it and can keep a couple of extra needles and the yarn in it.
Sorry if this is a repost.

knittingincarolina
04-10-2009, 11:42 AM
Great idea!
I was thinking...:think: the Quaker Oats tubular can would hold a skein of yarn, you could cut a thin strip from the edge to the center of the lid for the yarn to go through. You could make two for two skeins. I suppose you could even spiff 'em up with contact paper...hmm...I think I might try this...oatmeal anyone? :wink:

That's a great idea. Where I work, I have an empty oatmeal container every other day. I'll start bringing some home and pass this tip along to my knitting group at work.:thumbsup: :cheering:

knittingincarolina
04-10-2009, 11:45 AM
i keep all buttons and decorations in a small tackle box, boxes sold in the craft section are too expensive!

victoryah

I used a clear cannister from a set that I bought for another use. I have been known to use very clean mayo jars.

I can fully relate to the migraines, I have them too. Makes it very hard to knit:wink: The new blood pressure meds I'm on has cut mine in half, and reduced the severity and lenght of the ones I do get.

MrsWildchild
04-16-2009, 07:33 PM
Like others have said, I'm new and I probably don't have much, and probably nothing that isn't obvious, but these are some of the things I do:

1. I do use paper and pen, if, say, the instructions are to knit rows 32-39 evenly, I just write down those numbers and cross them off as they are done. Or for other patterns, such as decreasing rows on DPNs or whatever.

2. I keep all my knitting stuff in a plastic bin: patterns and books in the bottom, DPNs in their original envelopes, leftover yarn (all in plastic ziplock bags with their labels), and other knitting notions.

3. I have a knitting ruler with the holes in it for identifying unmarked needles.

4. My biggest fear when I started was a needle slipping out, so I bought some rubber point protectors. People would laugh at me seeing me knit in the round on DPNs with these 6 big red points jostling around!

5. Speaking of knitting in the round on DPNs, when I had to start with a very small number of stitches, like 8, or 4 (I don't do i-cord), in order to identify which way the needles should point ('cause they do twist around before you get to them), I would mark one end of each needle (all the lefts or all the rights) with these point protectors.

6. I try to foresee any parts of the pattern that should be marked, such as where you started decreasing, if you need to find it later.

7. If I am doing matching parts (2 legs of a stuffed toy) and the pattern only says to work for a certain number of inches, I also keep track of how many rows it took to get to that length, and try to do the same on the other.

8. I use small rings of yarn as stitch markers, because they are very flexible, and come in a unlimited number of colours, can be made to size, and are easily removed.

9. I love my new interchangeable needles, and I change the length of my cable a lot, depending on how comfortable it feels.

10. My grandmother-in-law always uses safety pins to mark things, including the right side.

11. I generally work with a copy of the pattern instead of the original, so I can mark on it, it won't get lost or torn by my daughter, etc.

12. When knitting in the round on DPNs, I vary the spot where the needle change occurs, to avoid vertical lines caused by tension changes. When doing magic loop, I leave the last 1-2 stitches that were worked on the right needle.

13. I bought a couple of balls of yarn at the dollar store, and whenever there's a new technique or something I'm not sure of how to do I test it out on the cheap yarn first.

That's all I can think of for now. I'll let you know if there are any more.

MrsWildchild
04-16-2009, 07:44 PM
A couple more:

14. I try to calculate the approximate number of stitches in the entire project. This helps me to estimate yarn requirements, time involved (if I am on a deadline), etc.

15. If I am trying to figure out yarn requirements, etc, I'll measure off a given length of working yarn, say, 20 inches from where it leaves the last stitch worked, toward the ball, and mark it with a clothespin. Then I work say 10 stitches, measure what's left of this measured yarn, subtract to find out, say, that 10 stitches took 12 inches of yarn, so 10000 stitches will take about 333 yards, if my math is correct.

Gertie
04-16-2009, 10:08 PM
MrsWildchild - Great ideas.
>9. I love my new interchangeable needles, and I change the length of my cable a lot, depending on how comfortable it feels.<

What kind of interchangeables? I really like my Denise.

G J
04-17-2009, 11:16 AM
Gertie, I LOVE my KnitPicks options.

MrsWildchild
04-17-2009, 07:36 PM
MrsWildchild - Great ideas.
>9. I love my new interchangeable needles, and I change the length of my cable a lot, depending on how comfortable it feels.<

What kind of interchangeables? I really like my Denise.

Yes, mine are, too, though I didn't necessarily choose them because I thought they were superior. I don't have the luxury of a local yarn shop. The only real craft store around here had never heard of them (my husband was going to get some as a gift). So I mail-ordered them. The prices of the Denise ones, and their shipping rates were reasonable, so that's really why I got them, but I really am satisfied with them. Of course I didn't have the pleasure of comparing any other ones by physically examining them and trying them out. By the reviews everyone is giving on this forum, all the popular sets are good choices. After using them a little bit, though, I wonder if the cables on other brands are thinner or more flexible. All in all, a good buy, anyway.

Happy knitting!

Gertie
04-18-2009, 12:26 AM
[QUOTE=MrsWildchild;1223721]By the reviews everyone is giving on this forum, all the popular sets are good choices. After using them a little bit, though, I wonder if the cables on other brands are thinner or more flexible. All in all, a good buy, anyway.QUOTE]

Right. From what I've read, all the major brands have their advantages.

I've heard that the others' cables are thinner. Since I don't do magic loop, this doesn't bother me. I like the Denise cables. I also like that I don't have to be concerned about the tips unscrewing. Also, the points don't hurt my right index finger. But this is just another matter of personal choice.

On the interchangeables, we really need to follow the rule of agreeing to disagree. :thumbsup: (But of course we must follow that rule all the time.)

Have a good :knitting: weekend!

Gertie
04-18-2009, 12:28 AM
Gertie, I LOVE my KnitPicks options.

Good. I'm glad you found a set that works for you.

You have a good :knitting: weekend, also.

JudiToots
06-05-2009, 08:04 AM
I have been knitting for 2 years but I have only done 3 scarves. The first scarf was for DH. I was a newbie and didn't know the best way to introduce a new skein plus the dye lots weren't the same. :doh: He likes it anyway. The second scarf was for me. I used 2 strands of Homespun and size 17 needles. Made a mistake on it and it sat for 8 months until I finally had my sister fix it for me last Thanksgiving. Last week, I finished a scarf for DS #2. He loves it even though it isn't anything special...just k1, p1. This week, I am really getting brave. I am making a hat to match DH's scarf. I bought circular needles and a contrasting yarn. So far, it is going well...once I got used to holding the circular needles. :)

Thanks to everyone for their suggestions. I have made a document with all the ones that I would like to implement.

Arielluria
06-05-2009, 10:34 AM
Way to go. Hats are great and quick and get you to feeling like an expert! Plus, getting brave is what advances your knitting! Who cares WHAT it looks like in the end? If a designer makes a wonky-looking scarf they call it an innovative idea, but if a beginner does it it's a mistake?!? :nails: I think NOT!

My knitting advanced by leaps and bounds when I found KH because the videos totally showed me 'I can do THAT'!!!!!!!!!!!!! So my 2nd FO after finding KH was a fair isle dog sweater, thanks to that KH video! Needless to say, KH ROCKS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!:notworthy:

So just go for it, EVERYONE! 'If it doesn't fit, you don't HAVE to a gift'..........ok, ok, I know, bad play on an old O.J. joke. But the point is, if it doesn't fit or goes awry there's no shame in ripping back and starting over! I've made 2 hats which turned out badly because I didn't bother to gauge swatch and substituted yarn which (if you look in my Ravelry projects page) are funny because one looks more like a yalmulke and the other is so tiny it fits my tiniest dog's head. Made for a good picture on Ravelry but might be too small even for a premie.

We learn much more from our mistakes then from our successes someone once said.

OK, off my pep-talk soap-box now. :hug: to all my KH family and may you all have a blessed and wonderful weekend. I know I will because DH and I made up. Around here that means ;) AND pizza! And if I'm lucky even a little yarn. :roflhard:
:muah:

JudiToots
06-05-2009, 11:18 AM
Arielluria,

Thanks for the pep talk. It's encouraging. Perhaps I will try to take a picture of the hat so far. (I'm actually just making up the pattern as I go so I don't know how it will turn out.)

Are you also Arielluria on Ravelry?

BTW, I like your scripture (in sig).

Arielluria
06-05-2009, 11:45 AM
Thanks, yup I'm Arielluria there too, add me to friends and I'll see you there when I get off my Ravelry diet. ;)

cacunn
06-05-2009, 11:58 AM
but if a beginner does it it's a mistake?!? '

We learn much more from our mistakes then from our successes someone once said.

I don't know if I have said in this thread before or not, but,

There are no mistakes in knitting!


What occurs are design elements that we did not initially plan on. If we like the new design element we keep it, if we don't like the design element, we save the idea for possible latter use, frog back to a good point and work on other new design elements.

The pair of socks I am now working on have had about eight new design elements that I decided not to use in this design.

True I could finish projects faster if I paid more attention to the intended design elements, but, I knit for fun, not speed.

G J
06-05-2009, 01:17 PM
Here's a gauge/sizing tip:

When you begin a garment that's constructed in pieces, make the size your gauge swatch says you should and then CHECK your gauge BEFORE you get to any size-specific elements. THEN, if necessary, change to a different size.
For example, I'm making Athos (http://www.berroco.com/ng2/ng2_athos_pv.html). I began on the back using my gauge swatch of 4.5 spi, so I CO for size S. When I got to the sleeves, I discovered that my gauge was actually 4.75 spi. I'm doing the sleeve decreases so that my bind-offs and decreases bring the stitch counts to the size M stitch counts. Then I will begin the FRONT on the size L. When I get to the sleeves, I'll switch so the bind offs and decreases will bring the stitch counts to match the M so the front and back will match at the shoulders. This way, it's big enough around the middle, the side seams are slightly toward the back (no big deal), but the shoulders will match and it will FIT! I've done this on other projects and it turns out beautifully without a lot of re-knitting.

I hate it when my gauge swatch lies, but when it does, I can (usually) still make it work!

Ijustwantacraft
06-09-2009, 03:01 PM
I have been getting my patterns in large binders, the millions I have in drawers and cupboards. Bought a couple binders at wallmart. Also found a great way to keep all the needles and hooks. Also at wallmart It is a folding case for bathroom items for travel and little file case for the cables. The travel case was 13.99 and the binders 4.99 . Here is photo of some results, if you need some ideas for organized. link to photo to big to post here:
http://i15.photobucket.com/albums/a398/justwantacraft/getorganized.jpg?t=1244572240

Arielluria
06-09-2009, 03:42 PM
Good work :cheering:, I just LOOOOOOOOOVE getting organized! :woot:

helenlou
06-29-2009, 03:00 PM
silly question I know but what is a []'lifeline'?[/]

cacunn
06-29-2009, 05:12 PM
silly question I know but what is a []'lifeline'?[/]


Not a silly question, we have all asked it one time or another.

A life line is a piece of floss. thread or some type of marker at is threaded through a know good row of knitting. If you have to frog this will stop the frogging at a know good point. If you have interchangeable needles you can put this line in the hole used to tighten the needle.

Ellieblue
07-06-2009, 02:51 PM
We.ve all done it. While doing our magic loop socks ,2 at once, our yarns become twisted around each other. I was working on two sleeves and came up with this idea. When you finish one item (sock, sleeve) store that ball of yarn inside your item, then go on to the next one, pull out the ball of yarn, work the second sock,sleeve, put that yarn inside. NO MORE TANGLES. Ellie:woot:

Squeakee
07-06-2009, 11:17 PM
My hints may have already been noted but here goes:

#1
As I get a lot of my patterns from those who are gracious enough to share through websites and blogs, to keep track I have started a database that includes the following: website, pattern author, recommended needles and yarn, yarn and needles used (if different), and a photo of completed work. When written down it may seem time consuming but believe me it's come in very handy for me.

#2
We all know how hard it is to pass up a good yarn sale, which results in a multitude of yarn skeins with no room to store. I now store mine in vacuum storage bags. Works great with wool and other natural fibers. Keeps it dry and I have stored about 30 skeins in a large bag.

motherpink
07-07-2009, 02:33 AM
Here is a rip from me:yay:

If I do a pattern and I go wrong within the rows I had done. I put a smaller single pointed needle in that row and undo it till you get to that row with the smaller needle on and it saves loosing your stitches :happydance:

cacunn
07-07-2009, 09:30 AM
I am trying my first ever two at once socks and have a little case that separates the two balls of yarn. I now that I have used it for a while I am beginning to really dislike the case because it has solid holes in the lid where the yarn passes through. If for some reason I want to change the case I either have to cut the yarn or unravel the entire ball of yarn.

When in Target yesterday I noticed in the dollar section up front a small bag designed to hold six bottles in separate pockets. My intent is to put each ball of yarn in its own pocket and have pockets left over for tools. pattern ect.

I think the multi-pocket bag will also come in handy when I start some color work.

Leania
07-13-2009, 09:40 PM
I thought I'd add in my own tips; don't think I saw them listed.

I have two tote bags and two snap top lid boxes; tote bags I keep my yarn (not in use) in and boxes I keep projects, working yarn, and needles/crochet hooks in. I also bought a knitting book w/cd that has some plastic zipper bags that can be useful. (Can be meaning I haven't used them yet.)

Patters: I have trouble reading them with just the "boxes"; can't use a ruler because I have a 2 year old and I'd lose my spot. Don't want to mark on it and can't afford plastic sleeves/dry erase markers? I copy the pattern in a spiral notebook and then when I number the rows: odd numbers on the right, even on the left. That way when I stop I can see what row I'm on based on if I'm knitting (odd) or purling (even). Now if the first row is purling you can just reverse the idea: purl (odd) knit (even). Helpful to me at least.

RuthieinMaryland
07-20-2009, 02:46 PM
Hi, everyone! :waving:

Cacuun mentioned using a container for knitting with two balls of yarn. Some time ago I came up with this idea and it's been very helpful -

I take a gallon zip loc bag and using a zig-zag stitch I stitch down the middle of the bag. This gives me two pockets for yarn and I can either clip the corners and pull the yarn out through the bottom or, if I'm using one without the little zipper thingy for closing it, I can pull the yarn out the top corners and just squeeze the top shut along the tracks in the middle.

This was so helpful to me. All I had to do was just flip the whole bag over and if I flipped it the wrong way, just another couple of flicks of the wrist and I was good to go!

Hope this helps!

Ruthie :hug:

Arielluria
07-20-2009, 03:01 PM
Good idea. I use the ziplocks too. Before starting I punch a hole with a paper hole puncher just under the ziplock zipper to thread my yarn through. If I need to stick the project in the bag, only about 1" of yarn is exposed.

erinjeanpierre
10-05-2009, 07:31 PM
Ok so how do I tell the difference between a knit or purl on the row under the one I just knit?

G J
10-05-2009, 10:00 PM
As you're facing the next row, a purl stitch will have a pearl appearance. It looks like a turtle neck
A knit stitch will have a v-shape, like a v-neck.

ajsgramma
11-08-2009, 09:49 AM
[QUOTE=hartleystudio;1141936]


Late at night, when the family's all asleep,
you will find me counting stitches
instead of counting sheep!


Did you make this saying up or find it somewhere? I love it & would love to add it to a scarf I'm knitting. Do you mind?:muah:
Thanks & (((HUGS))) Verna

offgridgirl
11-08-2009, 11:12 PM
I haven't read all the pages so maybe this has been mentioned but I will re-list it

If I have an intricate pattern and I'm working in a dark color. I do a test piece with bigger needles and light colored wool. I then mark each row with different colored pieces of wool. So I just take that piece of wool out of the test piece to remind me where I am in the patter....

Hope this helps....:mrgreen:

CountryNaturals
12-17-2009, 08:49 PM
Here's another one that's probably been mentioned before, but it just came up in my latest project, so I thought I'd share in case someone else may have forgotten this one.
If you're working on a pattern where you have to count rows and might lose track, remember that the tail of your work is at the front when you're starting an odd-numbered row, and at the back when you're starting an even-numbered row. Sometimes that little clue is all you need to figure out where you are in a pattern. ;)

Ellieblue
02-01-2010, 01:46 PM
I use my plastic blocking board to hold the pieces of knitting that I am sewing together in place. I line up the two pieces and hold them in place with pins. This helps keep the pieces lined up across from each other so that you don't end up with one piece being shorter than another. It is a great help in setting in sleeves.

AniseRN
02-15-2010, 02:04 AM
I just joined, and spent the last couple of days perusing the wonderful hints and tips. Then I went back to my sock project and getting my row count mixed up--so I went to the bead store and made a pair of row counters! Thanks for the GREAT idea!

AniseRN

Edited to add: I tried to post a picture and to quote the original poster, but I can't do that on my very first post. Ah well.

Shandeh
02-15-2010, 05:23 PM
Welcome AniseRN! :hug:

Arielluria
02-15-2010, 07:31 PM
Welcome! KH is the BEST site!

CountryNaturals
02-27-2010, 08:10 PM
When working with multiple balls of yarn, use butterfly hair clips to keep the ones you aren't using from unwinding and getting tangled while you're working with one of the others. Just grab a few strands, including the end you're pulling from.
http://countrynaturals.com/knit-crochet/images/yarnClips.jpg

tothaisland
03-04-2010, 03:53 PM
I am such a bag lady that I have different projects in all those tote bags I can't resist when I am shopping. I have a clear zippered bag with shelves in it hanging in my spare room's closet and each shelf has a future project, directions and the name of the person I intend to make it for. When I finish one project, I just go get the next shelf down. Sometimes I switch up the shelves if I need something earlier. I think there are some great tips on here and I am glad some one thought to do this. Now the dilema is do we print them out everyday or will they stay on here forever? Hmmmm....
Thanks to everyone who has contributed! Yah for knitters!:X:

Woodi
03-13-2010, 09:27 AM
I only read to page 11, so don't know if this tip was offered already, but here goes:

When I knit socks, I buy 2 sets of 4 needles, so I can cast on and knit both socks at the same time. eg. when one cuff is completed, I put that sock down and begin the second cuff. This way both cuffs come out the same length, and also: the toes will be the same colors (if I want them that way), cuz I use a different ball on each needle set.

It also helps me to remember how to do....cuz once I've mastered a heel (for instance), I can immediately do the second heel and not have to learn it all over again.

AND it avoids SSS (second sock syndrome).

Soon I will try the toe-up socks and will need 4 circular needles for it!

blm50
03-13-2010, 10:49 AM
And since I have 2 granddaughters I always have hairclips around!

cacunn
03-13-2010, 12:58 PM
You can do toe-up with double points, I prefer circulars, but DPs will work.

AngelaR
03-19-2010, 07:12 AM
I keep the yarn long term projects, like sweaters and afghans in plastic coffee cans with a slit cut in the lid and pull the yarn from there. Since I have dogs and cats and kids and a husband, none of whom have any respect for my yarn, it keeps out hair, sticky fingers, spilled coffee/coke/milk and is very easy to clean up when company comes over. When I am going to the doctor, I slip a can with the project into a tote bag and I have something to do while I wait... and wait... and wait.

golfer
04-27-2010, 03:14 PM
I was just thinking - would it be a good thing to have a "mannequin's foot" (like used to display a shoe ) for a handy sock knitting guide.
Would be able to see how it was coming along and how close to finishing the toe area? Has anyone ever tried this? maybe I will start scouting the antique/old stuff stores. Write back if you have
come up with something. The "drying/shaping" item sold in LYS would not do the same thing. Love making socks (still new at it)!

cacunn
04-27-2010, 06:21 PM
My questions is 1) why buy what is at the end of your leg? and would any commercially available "mannequin foot" really match your foot?

I do like idea of displaying some of my socks on "mannequin feet."

wellslipmystitches
05-07-2010, 07:08 PM
Shandeh mentioned some time ago that she uses a music stand to support her patterns, also that she's an English knitter like me. How fast must one knit when every stitch and article is knit with love? I'm a musician and I've given my music stands to grandbabies whom I've taught to play various instruments, so now, in order to escape a pain in the neck I use an old picture holder that works for holding most patterns and pattern books. You can use a cookbook holder, although they're rather pricey. Get a plate holder at the $1 store and it'll work. You can put it on a table and see a pattern upright without straining your neck. Not a grand idea but maybe helpful.
Jean

hyperactive
05-31-2010, 11:56 AM
My tip is from my high school teacher in crafts:

you know when needles (metal) get "non-gliding"? and the stitches just won't move? Sometimes it is the yarn, most likely sweaty fingers are the problem.

Well, take the needle and rub it over your scalp (under the hair) for a few seconds. CAREFUL! it DOES have a pointy end or two!

The natural "wool fat" you provide helps perfectly! It is logical but still surprising when you hear it first.

Does anyone else do it? Do you get funny looks in public?

ajsgramma
06-07-2010, 09:48 AM
Does anyone else do it? Do you get funny looks in public?

I even use this technique on needlepoint needles when they need a little extra glide. If your hair isn't oily enough a sheet of waxed paper to rub the needles with works great, too. I save cereal bags for the waxed paper in them. (((HUGS)))Verna

cacunn
06-07-2010, 11:04 AM
When fly fishing I will rub the one end of a multi-piece rod along the side of my nose to pick up some oil. It makes it easier to separate the rod section at the end of the day. I wonder if this would also work for knitting needles. A little oil and then spread it along the needle with my finger tips?

hyperactive
06-07-2010, 11:18 AM
the nose trick works, too. But I was afraid, someone would poke themselves in the eye!
And I think, the hair trick works a little better.
Real oil I would hate to be on my stitches. And it will probably rub off too soon.

cacunn
06-07-2010, 11:22 AM
. . . But I was afraid, someone would poke themselves in the eye! . . .

Why do you think my avatar's eyes are crossed? :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

AIR
09-16-2010, 09:28 AM
1. (This can be useful:blooby: ) I like knitting in the air especially in summer, but the weather is sunny :hot: and your fingers become sweaty, especially when you use wool yarn. I accidentally found out that regular sanitizer can help that problem for quite a long time.

2. (For those who have little girl friends;) ) One of my friends has a daughter of about 7 years old, who can not knit. Most time we meet at the lake near the forest. If you like to work in the open air, you know that the yarn may sometimes be on the ground, you have to pull the thread out of the yarn. But if you have someone interested in how you are kneetting, she always can help you, and you both will be happy: you do not have problems and the girl make the first steps in knitting. Motivate people around you and they sure will help you;)

3. (For those who get tired:frog: ) Some times I can end my project in a several months, why? Because I'm tired of it. The environment is changing you have more ideas... so just give you a break and you'll see how fast you'll finish it. You mind just like to do something special about yur project, but need time to think. Please, care about your creativity:balloons: , it is the most important thing in the project!

CountryNaturals
09-19-2010, 01:34 PM
I'm working on a small, flat project using large circular needles. The nylon cable part kept getting in my way so I let it loop naturally behind my work and stuck a clip clothespin on it to weight it down. Works great! I'm guessing a large bead or clip-on earring would probably work, too.

RuthieinMaryland
09-19-2010, 02:04 PM
Suz!

That's brilliant! And it really helps with an entrelac project I've been working on, knitting flat but using circs. Wowser! Thanks so much!

Ruthie :o)

PS - Great website! I just checked it out and it's just grand! Love the graphics tips, am going back for more!

CountryNaturals
09-19-2010, 02:32 PM
Thank you for the nice words. I'm crabby this morning and that really cheered me up.

RuthieinMaryland
09-22-2010, 03:07 PM
Thank you for the nice words. I'm crabby this morning and that really cheered me up.

Hi, Suz! :waving:

Glad to hear it! I come from "crab" country so I can relate to that! :roflhard: Except the crabs around here get steamed with Old Bay Seasoning and Beer!

Ruthie

cacunn
09-22-2010, 03:47 PM
Hi, Suz! :waving:

Glad to hear it! I come from "crab" country so I can relate to that! :roflhard: Except the crabs around here get steamed with Old Bay Seasoning and Beer!

Ruthie


Crabs, did I hear some say they had steamed crabs? I need a trip to Kent Island. There is a hotel within walking distance of a crab house. Pick crabs and drink beer for a couple of hours and you don't have to worry about driving home, just weaving back to the hotel.

I can feel the Old Bay in the cuts on my fingers from picking crabs. :waah: :waah: :waah: not from the salt in the cuts, it has just been to long since my last good crab feast.

RuthieinMaryland
09-22-2010, 03:54 PM
Oh my gosh! Another crabaholic!!! And in dire need of a crab feed!!!

The best crabs around here usually can be found this month and even next month. They're nice and fat, having escaped the crabbers all season. But once they're in a crabaholic's clutches.....

Here's hoping you get your crab feed soon! :o)

Ruthie

CountryNaturals
09-22-2010, 07:33 PM
Hi, Suz! :waving:

Glad to hear it! I come from "crab" country so I can relate to that! :roflhard: Except the crabs around here get steamed with Old Bay Seasoning and Beer!

Ruthie

YIKES! I'm sorry I said anything. I really don't want to be steamed in beer. I promise to be more cheerful in the future. :roflhard:

AmyV
10-06-2010, 12:08 PM
I read this whole thread over the last couple days. THANK you to everyone who posted. I picked up a couple GREAT tips. :yay: :cheering: :muah:

Most of my tips were already posted, but I have a few that weren't expressly covered:

1. When putting my work down or throwing it into my project bag to go, I wrap a rubber band around the pointed ends of the needles so my work can't slip off. If you're using straight needles (I use circulars for everything) this will also prevent you from losing a needle or having to dig for it. If you're using DPNs I would just use a DPN holder or point protectors. I'm totally paranoid about this esp. since I use super slippery needles.

2. I love to find new uses for old objects. I use a retainer case to hold my necessities that I keep with my current WIP (yes, I only have 1 at a time on the needles). It holds a rubber band, retractable measuring tape, yarn needles, st markers, a row counter, lifeline floss, small fold up scissors, knit picks keys, safety pins, and tiny butterfly clips. I just added a bobby pin last night thanks to someone else's tip!

3. I would suggest not only learning to read your sts, but learn different ways to knit like Portuguese and Combination (eastern uncrossed). You may find one of these ways is less taxing or faster. You also don't get rowing out with Combination knitting. My knits and purls are the same tension and purls are just as quick and easy as knit sts.

4. I have a set of Knit Picks Options and Denise interchangeables. I couldn't live without them. There are some sizes and cord lengths offered in each that aren't offered in the other, so between the 2 I have everything covered. Plus if I need a second set of the same size/length at the same time I have it. I like to knit 2 identical objects (sleeves, etc) at the same time on separate needles to avoid tangling.

5. Take full advantage of KH, YouTube, and the knitting chart maker by Jacquie (http://jacquie.typepad.com/Charts/knitChart.htm). I've learned so many new techniques, had SO many questions answered, and started designing my own cables with these indispensible sites. :woohoo:

6. I also crochet. I had a mini Maglite flashlight that came in a hard case. I took out the plastic insert that cradled the flashlight and it's the perfect size to hold all my hooks!

Happy :knitting:

RuthieinMaryland
10-06-2010, 03:39 PM
:waving: Hi!

I'm so glad you took the time to read all the tips! Aren't they awesome? This is such a knowledgeable group and so generous in their willingness to share!

Your tips are excellent, too! I was just doing a Fair Isle sample piece to practice the technique (it's a small bag!) and thought I'd use it to make a traveling accessories kit to keep in my to-go project bag. You reminded me of some of the things that need to go in it. Thanks!

Happy knitting, Amy,

Ruthie :knitting:

Gertie
10-06-2010, 10:08 PM
3. I would suggest not only learning to read your sts, but learn different ways to knit like Portuguese and Combination (eastern uncrossed). You may find one of these ways is less taxing or faster. You also don't get rowing out with Combination knitting. My knits and purls are the same tension and purls are just as quick and easy as knit sts.

Rowing out? I've heard that with combination knitting on st st, both sides of the st are the same instead on one side being more verticle. Is this what you're referring to?

davidwilson
10-13-2010, 03:31 AM
I love the idea of writing info of the front of the bag. I think if I had to look at the date I started a project every time I picked it up I might work a little harder on it. LOL.:rofl:
Seriously, I think it is a good way to keep that info handy.
My tip is: I always make a working copy of my pattern so I can mark on it or whatever. The original stays in a plastic sleeve in my notebook of patterns. I'm only a little organized though. I don't even have them in Alphabetical order.:wink:

Hi, Jax! Your advice is worth a LOT more than 2 cents! I have no little ones to disturb my knitting, but I manage to "disturb" it all the time! So just yesterday I bought a large rectangular lined straw bag to tuck things away in when I'm not knitting. I've been forever having to get my DH to move the sofa so I can retrieve needles, stitch markers, etc. Not any more! Thanks.

AmyV
10-13-2010, 01:35 PM
Rowing out? I've heard that with combination knitting on st st, both sides of the st are the same instead on one side being more verticle. Is this what you're referring to?

Hi Gertie,
Rowing out has to do with uneven tension. Here's a picture and a better explanation than I can give: http://www.girlfromauntie.com/journal/great-idiosyncrasies-of-knitting/

:knitting: