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Knitting_Guy
11-08-2008, 11:20 AM
ArtLady brought this to my attention and I thought I'd warn everyone. As a Linux user I don't need keep up with virus alerts, but as most of you use WIndows you should know about it.

There is a very malicious virus being spread through email. You need to be very cautious about opening emails (you really should always be).

You can read about the details here http://www.snopes.com/computer/virus/postcard.asp

Also, ignore emails warning about how this virus will "burn your entire hard drive" as this is not the case. The virus is real, but not the new "super virus" being claimed by hoaxsters. It's been around for a while but there is a new burst of it being spread again.

evona
11-08-2008, 11:34 AM
Thank God I have a Mac :wink:

Knitting_Guy
11-08-2008, 12:12 PM
Thank God I have a Mac :wink:

Exactly how I feel about running my machines on Linux :rofl:

suzeeq
11-08-2008, 12:29 PM
I use yahoo for mail and they screen it. Haven't had a virus problem since we don't use OE.

dmknits
11-08-2008, 12:38 PM
Why don't Linux and Mac ever get viruses? I've never understood that. (Wondering why PCs can't do the same thing to avoid them.)

Jan in CA
11-08-2008, 12:57 PM
Why don't Linux and Mac ever get viruses? I've never understood that. (Wondering why PCs can't do the same thing to avoid them.)

There are a lot less of them around so they aren't targeted for one thing. I use NOD32 (Eset) and haven't had a problem since even though I have a PC. It always pays to be cautious though no matter what virus software you use.

We need ninjas to go after these guys! http://www.clipartof.com/images/thumbnail/706.gif (http://www.clipartof.com/details/emoticon/706.html)

Knitting_Guy
11-08-2008, 12:57 PM
Why don't Linux and Mac ever get viruses? I've never understood that. (Wondering why PCs can't do the same thing to avoid them.)
There are several reasons for that. Linux is a unix-like OS, and Mac OS is based on the BSD kernel (they're both Unix cousins). The core of both operating systems operates much differently than Windows in that they are set up to be more security-centric by default. Also, in Linux there is no such thing as a self-extracting or self-executing file (which is how a virus operates).

Linux requires permissions to be set to access system files, a normal user and any programs they launch can't gain access to those files without specifically authorizing it via commands and passwords. This prevents any such virus from accessing the system.

Also, there simply aren't any known virus "in the wild" for either operating system because those scumbags who write and spread virus know it would be pointless as it couldn't do any real damage.

Windows can be made to be pretty secure by setting up user accounts and permissions correctly. They started going that way with Vista, but there are still numerous security holes a virus can exploit.

While it can take weeks or even months for Microsoft's relatively small team to identify and create a patch for a security hole, there are literally millions of eyes examining Linux code and when a hole is identified a patch is released in a matter of hours. That is the real strength of open source software. I've written a few patches and bug fixes myself over the years.

Bottom line is that most virus are written to target Windows, and if there is a vulnerability that can be exploited someone will write code to exploit it. Most Linux users became such as a direct result of the sloppy coding done by Microsoft. Well, that and Linux is free and we're cheap :rofl:

suzeeq
11-08-2008, 01:03 PM
Many more people use PCs, therefore viruses get written on them to attack others. MS is very lax in plugging holes that allow viruses and takes longer to be able to write fixes for them.

Knitting_Guy
11-08-2008, 01:09 PM
Keep in mind that most Linux users run PCs. It isn't the hardware that is vulnerable, it's the operating system.

Here's a decent article that explains to some extent why we don't see a successful Linux virus (although people have tried).

http://librenix.com/?inode=21

dmknits
11-08-2008, 01:18 PM
Thanks so much for the explanation. :)

lelvsdgs
11-08-2008, 04:21 PM
Thanks for the heads up. I'll pass this along. I've been seriously thining about switching to Linux but just haven't made the jump. Used to have a Mac and didn't think twice about viruses. Now I try to be super vigilant...