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View Full Version : Trying to find a similar stitch pattern...?


AngieLanigan
03-24-2009, 09:23 AM
I'm working on a drop-stitch scarf (Easy Drop Stitch Scarf pattern on Ravelry). Here's what the stitch pattern looks like:

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v139/AngieLuvBug/stitch-1.jpg

I'm trying to find (without any luck) a stitch pattern that's similar, but without the "holey" areas of the dropped stitches, that I can incorporate into a hat and mittens. There is a drop stitch hat pattern to match, but winters here are too cold for all those holes in a hat, especially for a child (who I'm making the set for).

Would anyone know of a stitch pattern (or actual hat or mitts pattern) that gives that wavy look? I think I'm adventerous enough to try and modify a basic garter/stockinette hat/mitt pattern to add even a bit of the wavy bit to the cuff/edge to make the set match more. Thanks!

Jan in CA
03-24-2009, 11:25 AM
Short rows can do that. Have you seen Lizard Ridge? If you learn the technique you can incorporate it into many things. I see you're on Ravelry so I'll link there as well.

Here's a Lizard Ridge Dishcloth -
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lizard-ridge-dishcloth

The original pattern and inspiration -
http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/lizard-ridge
http://www.knitty.com/ISSUEfall06/PATTlizardridge.html

AngieLanigan
03-24-2009, 12:20 PM
ooh, that's just what I'm looking for! I've heard of short rows, but haven't used them in anything yet. First time for everything! Thank you so much!

suzeeq
03-24-2009, 01:04 PM
Yeah, Lizard ridge would do that. Many people are using the dishcloth pattern for scarves, and even cowls.

margz3
03-25-2009, 09:53 AM
Lizard Ridge is exactly what came to my mind too! I am dying to make something with it! I would love to do the Noro afghan, but I need to win the lottery first lol!

lindainbathurst
03-26-2009, 09:23 PM
There is also the Double Hourglass, also called Wavy Ribbing pattern that I have in one of my stitch books. It gives pretty much the same look as lizard, except the pattern develops vertically instead of horizontal.