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View Full Version : What is more easily understood? (Pattern writing)


mwhite
03-26-2009, 04:55 PM
I'm writing a pattern and would like your opinions on the way it is written for long repeats.

Choice A: *K3tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, [sk2p, yo]x42, k1, yo, k3, sk2p*
(97x3=291 sts)

Choice B: K3tog, k3, yo, k1, yo, *sk2p, yo; repeat from * around to last 7 sts of repeat, then k1, yo, k3, sk2p.

Thanks, your opinion really counts!

alioop
03-26-2009, 05:00 PM
I definitely like B better.

Freyja
03-26-2009, 05:25 PM
B

thepurplegg
03-26-2009, 05:26 PM
B as well =)

linnypin
03-26-2009, 05:27 PM
I also write knitting patterns and (B) is the one for me

Lisa R.
03-26-2009, 05:28 PM
Definitely B!

Knit4Pie
03-26-2009, 05:30 PM
I'm with everyone else. Choice B for sure!

LadyFirelyght
03-26-2009, 06:14 PM
As the others have said, B!

Plantgoddess+
03-26-2009, 06:15 PM
definitely B

HollyP
03-26-2009, 06:38 PM
agree with everyone else B for sure!

knitspin2001
03-26-2009, 06:59 PM
B for sure.

mwhite
03-26-2009, 07:23 PM
Thanks everyone, that was apparently no contest! B it is....

How about this one:

Choice A: [K2, skp]x3, k3, [yo, k1, yo, k3]x7, yo, sk2p, yo, [k3, yo, k1, yo]x7, k3, [k2tog, k2]x3
(111 sts)

Choice B: ???

suzeeq
03-26-2009, 09:33 PM
That's manageable. You have 2 sets of sts that are repeated 7 times between a set of non-repeating sts, so you can't lump all the repeats together.

mwhite
03-26-2009, 09:36 PM
I agree, seems that sometimes you just have to concentrate and in order to work, this is as simple as it gets! I appreciate your input, Suzeeq.

Simply_Renee
03-27-2009, 11:58 AM
Thanks everyone, that was apparently no contest! B it is....

How about this one:

Choice A: [yo, k1, yo, k3]x7, [k3, yo, k1, yo]x7, k3, [k2tog, k2]x3
(111 sts)

Choice B: ???

The way A is written seems clear to me- I can't think of a clearer way to write it.

(I rewrite a lot of patterns onto notecards in groupings & terms that make sense in my head. This one I would leave as is although I would write the "groups" on separate lines on the card.)

Whatcha designing?

mwhite
03-27-2009, 12:26 PM
Oh, you know me, a lace shawl that starts as a circular and turns into a triangle.....Can it be done??? We shall soon see! I've been working on the pattern since January and after no less than 3 trashcans full of "this won't work", it has been interesting. I hope to be able to release it for test knitting by the weekend. Wish me luck!

Jan in CA
03-27-2009, 01:38 PM
B!

suzeeq
03-27-2009, 02:08 PM
I do triangular shawls and add extra panels to turn them into semi-circular ones. So starting as a circular and going to a triangle isn't so weird.

Writing a pattern so someone else can do it is much harder than just winging it by yourself. I made a cross between Clapotis and the Sunday Market shawl and it's been interesting trying to write it out.

mwhite
03-27-2009, 05:47 PM
I'd love to see that! Now, is a clapotis wavy and rounded at the corners?

I'm at the transition point and have done an indention, now I need to decide whether the center of my corners should be the indention or vice versa. I tried it one way with a regular bind off and it was too tight. I discovered the bind off where you k2, then knit these together and k1 again, passing the first st over the second and it seems nice and stretchy. And it leaves a tiny little picot so that I can pull it out when blocking and that gives it a nice edging.

Then I get to thinking about how I want the edges to be decorative yet the shawl is super lacy and I just worry about too much....all of it gets to wandering around in my brain(what there is left of it) and thus the 3 trashcans full of "this won't work".... the whole time trying to make sure that the pattern stays on pattern....know what I mean??? Chill and coffeetime are my salvation.

suzeeq
03-27-2009, 06:40 PM
The clapotis is a rectangle knit on the diagonal - you start with just a couple sts, inc at the end of every row, then continue increasing on just the knit rows and dec at the end of the purl rows until you get to the end section. It's main feature is the drop sts. Here's the Ravelry link - http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/clapotis

The SMS - http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/sunday-market-shawl - is knit as a straight rectangle with drop sts. I didn't like how the straight edge was, so decided to do it diagonally like the clapotis. So it was a very simple change, but it's hard to describe so it comes out right.

mwhite
03-29-2009, 11:59 AM
The way A is written seems clear to me- I can't think of a clearer way to write it.

(I rewrite a lot of patterns onto notecards in groupings & terms that make sense in my head. This one I would leave as is although I would write the "groups" on separate lines on the card.)

Whatcha designing?

This is EXCELLENT! I tried this by separating the instructions on different lines. It works very well and helps a great deal with stitch counts. Thank you for this suggestion!!!! :hug:

lolaburke
03-29-2009, 04:16 PM
Hi There,

I'm new to knitting, and am trying to understand this pattern. I think i've got it, but wanted to make sure, as this is an EXPENSIVE project! Can someone please help me understand this!!

K2, (k2,p2) to last 4 stitches, k4
K2, p2, (K2,p2)to last two stiches, k2

If the instructions are in parentheses, does this mean I repeat it until I get to the last 4 stiches? Also, is there a difference between capital and lowercase K vs k, or P vs p?

Any help is greatly appreciated!!

Thank you!!

Knit4Pie
03-29-2009, 04:42 PM
If the instructions are in parentheses, does this mean I repeat it until I get to the last 4 stiches? Also, is there a difference between capital and lowercase K vs k, or P vs p?

Yes, you repeat the part between parentheses to the last 4 (or 2) sts, depending on the line.

There's no difference between uppercase and lowercase letters. Usually the uppercase letters are at the start of a row or sentence.

wezyus
03-30-2009, 01:00 AM
definitely B

thecanfield
03-30-2009, 08:15 AM
B

mwhite
03-30-2009, 11:54 AM
Okay, think I figured out how to make a pretty little looped edge on the decreasing project...

A:K1, [RLNK]x5

B: K1, *return st to left needle and k1 repeat from *five times

Since there are multiple rows with this and the repeats are long, I would first place a new term in the abbreviations list, where I would make reference to the row which use this term.

Then repeat the explanation on the first row using it, then place into use the abbreviation on subsequent rows.


What is more easily understood?

Lighting57
03-30-2009, 01:20 PM
B! Be sure to include the amount of stitches when the row is finished.

ArtLady1981
03-30-2009, 02:41 PM
I vote for B. It is more common 'pattern language', and the 'repeat' is easier to wrap my brain around.

Plantgoddess+
03-30-2009, 04:48 PM
I agree with Artlady, B immediately makes more sense. Though with multiple explanations of the abbreviation as you describe, A would work. I think it would be simpler to just explain it in the row it will be used in.

MMario
03-31-2009, 08:52 AM
I agree with 'B' but would probably write it as:

k1; (return stitch to left needle, k1) x5

Simply_Renee
03-31-2009, 10:55 AM
With multiple lines with this, I would choose A. (and for dummy me, I would want "so you're knitting the same stitch 5 times") If I am reading it right?

knittingincarolina
03-31-2009, 01:34 PM
I like B better. It would also help to give the number of stitches you should have.

mwhite
03-31-2009, 03:01 PM
With multiple lines with this, I would choose A. (and for dummy me, I would want "so you're knitting the same stitch 5 times") If I am reading it right?

I intend to use this....I think it does help to just say what you mean and we can get confused by wording. I don't think of anyone as a dummy but we all interpret differently. You are absolutely correct, you are knitting the same stitch 5 times or "Reknitting".

mwhite
04-01-2009, 05:45 PM
Is this easily understood or do I need to repeat the directions used in row 119 for each subsequent row?

Note this direction:{RK2}, located after the first and last stitch of every pattern row. RK2 means “Re-knit 2 times”. As previously directed, to reknit, simply place the stitch back onto the left needle and knit it again as many times as directed. This does NOT increase or decrease the stitch or stitch count. Reknitting the stitch will form loops that will be pinned out during the blocking process.

Row 119: K1{Return st to left needle, K1}x2, k1, skp, k3, [yo, sk2p]x20, [yo, k1]x28, yo, [k3tog, yo]x20, k3, k2tog, k1, k2tog, k1{RK2} (149 sts)

Row 121: Sk2p{RK2}, [yo, sk2p]x16, [yo, k3, yo, k1]x4, yo, M2, yo, sk2p, yo, k3, yo, M3, yo, k3, yo, k3tog, yo, M2, yo, [k1, yo, k3, yo, ]x4, [k3tog, yo]x16, k3tog{RK2} (137 sts)