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View Full Version : I've gone over to the "other side."


Lisa R.
04-16-2009, 11:09 PM
Yep...I've joined you perfectionist folks who rip back again and again till you get it right. :-D

I'm doing a socks in a woven pattern, and while watching a movie inadvertently knitted an extra just plain knit row. I thought...tiny needles, little rows...it's no big deal--especially since I'm doing two at once and would have to go back two whole rows on each sock.

But...it was obvious.. VERY obvious. So...I ripped back the two rows, and began again. Only...I began in the wrong place, and essentially made the same mistake twice...so I ripped back again.

I can't tell you how much I hate ripping back---but now that it's all done, I'm so pleased with seeing it all looking right and good.

Can't say whether I'll do that for all my future mistakes...but for the noticeable ones, it's definitely worth it!

LadyFirelyght
04-17-2009, 01:02 AM
Restarting in the wrong place is precisely why I no longer rip back. I tink tink tink back to the mistake.

See, on my third pair of socks, I ripped back and it ended up taking me 2 hours to fix my mistake because I completely lost where I was at in the pattern. NO MORE FOR ME!

I love socks :)

globaltraveler
04-17-2009, 04:05 AM
A SOCK?! Honey, feel sorry for yourself when you've got 10 inches of sweater to frog back because you made a fairly obvious mistake right in the middle of the front and it can't be fixed by dropping stitches!!! :doh:

Kidding. It's frustrating, but to be honest, there's something really lovely about finishing a project and knowing that it's as perfect as you can make it, including the blood sweat and tears. I've been working on a cardi for a week and a half that hasn't gotten past the first three inches without being ripped back, and that's multiple times over that week and a half. (I think I finally have it, though.) Thank goodness I'm not working in cotton or something that shows every mistake, though, because there's two or three places where I finally had to decide "good enough" was good enough.

Actually, I'm quite pleased with this Hand Maiden Sea Silk in Midnight. It's very very expensive, but I may have to get more of it anyway, just because it's a dream to use -- and it hides a multiple of sins really well!

Really, I've come to see frogging or tinking or whatever as just a part of knitting -- it's like in sewing: if you aren't prepared to rip seams, don't take up sewing!

margz3
04-17-2009, 09:30 AM
I go back and forth on this one.....I really, really hate frogging - sometimes if I have to frog, I'll just give up on the project! But if I make a small mistake, I'll just let it go - most of the time it probably isn't noticeable to anyone but me! I am working on my first pair of socks right now, and have made a couple of small errors, which I am leaving in place. They are barely noticable, and who is going to see the top of my sock anyhow! :)

swcheng15
04-17-2009, 02:28 PM
Haha. Ahh, frogging. The bane of all knitter's existence, but such a necessity at times. I am also a perfectionist, but after working on something larger, a small error here and there truly makes it "one of a kind". :) For me, it really depends on where the mistake is, and how far I've already gone. When I first started knitting my first baby raglan sweater (thank god it was baby sized), I had to make them in 5 pieces and then seam (yuck!). Well, long story short, the front panel was shorter than my back panels, and my sleeve lengths were based off the front panels. So I redid the front and the sleeves then sewed the pieces together (before I learned how to matress stitch). THEN I learned the correct way to seam (still working on that skill), so I unsewed all the pieces and did it again. Nuts.

I haven't tried socks yet though...if I did, I'll probably start with the most basic pattern there is out there AND I'd try to do both at the same time.

Anarfea
04-18-2009, 03:33 PM
My boyfriend's dad calls me "Penelope" after Odysseus' wife who weaves durring the day and tears out all her weaving at knight. I don't like knowing there are mistakes in my knitting, even if no one else knows they're there. I knit an entrelanc scarf and there is one tiny hole in the middle where I left too much space picking up stitches and it really bothers me. I wish I had fixed it.

I'm not psycho enough to frog the whole scarf, though, but I might get some thread and cinch the hole.

I'm with Ladyfirelight though--I tink rather than frog if I'm working on anything complicated. And I also usually try to fix the mistake without frogging whenever possible.

And globaltraveler, what mistakes can't be fixed by dropping stitches? Sometimes I have to frog since I can't figure out to fix it, but I thought that anything could be fixed by dropping stitches if you know how...

mathwizard
04-19-2009, 08:57 AM
The perfectionist in me frogs when I can't fix it by dropping stitches. I have frogged those 6 inches but I still like things ot be perfect! I have a friend who designs and she doesn't frog at all. Calls it creative license and leaves it in.

WandaT
04-19-2009, 09:00 AM
I know what you mean. My friends call me a perfectionist but honestly I'm not!! I swear! LOL Depending on what it is and how noticeable (and how far back the mistake is) I may or may not frog. Probably depends on my mood too. It sucks, but you're right - after doing it and seeing it "perfect" it does give you a wonderful sense of satisfaction.

patsuweb
04-19-2009, 09:24 AM
I am on my first pair of real socks using sock weight yarn and size 1 DPN's, and as I have a great fear of dropping stitches or making a very noticable mistake, I have put in a lifeline. Using a yarn needle and a fine nylon type cord, I will be moving this about every inch or so...less trouble, time and stress. This is one of the best hints that I have ever come across. Another benefit, is that I can try my sock on as I go.

Cirrus
04-19-2009, 01:28 PM
I always tink back. It's very difficult to pick up stitches if you rip out when using a #1 needle. I recently tinked back 6 rows because I made an error which I didn't think would show, but it did of course. Somehow I had knitted into the stitch below the one I should have knitted into. Don't feel bad, it's just part of the process and you are knitting either way whether you are fixing or moving forward.

One thing I find that helps is that when I find an error and decide to take out, I just put the knitting down overnight or for a few hours, then I feel better about starting the repair process once I've let myself settle down and accept it.

TEMA
04-19-2009, 04:21 PM
If I have to frog, I usually frog the whole thing. I can never seem to pick up the stitches again.
Therefore I've learned to be a very good tinker...:teehee:
TEMA:knitting:

knittingymnast
04-19-2009, 05:32 PM
My boyfriend's dad calls me "Penelope" after Odysseus' wife who weaves durring the day and tears out all her weaving at knight.

See how we knitters end up putting a "k" before any word that starts with "n?" I do that all the time! :roflhard:

globaltraveler
04-20-2009, 07:42 AM
And globaltraveler, what mistakes can't be fixed by dropping stitches? Sometimes I have to frog since I can't figure out to fix it, but I thought that anything could be fixed by dropping stitches if you know how...

Sorry, only just saw this now!

If you make a mistake in a lace pattern, there's sometimes way too much yarn (if you've added stitches or some such) or sometimes way too little yarn (if you've left out too many stitches or such), and even blocking won't fix it properly. It might fix it more or less but if it's a catastrophic mistake, it's actually better to frog back (in my viewpoint, anyway, others might disagree) rather than spend twice the time trying to incorporate too little or too much yardage into surrounding stitches after fixing it.

Doublereeder2
04-20-2009, 08:02 AM
Great thread! Sometimes I tink, sometimes I rip; it really depends on the pattern and the needle size. For socks on #1s - tink. But if the sock mistake is small enough and I can just adjust the rows after, I just leave it. Not so on garments that people can actually see, though. For me it really depends on the severity of the error.

tish
04-20-2009, 09:00 AM
Yes, frogging is maddening, but sometimes worth it. I recently made by first laced project, ( a tiny shoulder purse), but had to frog it MANY times whenever I made a mistake, right back to the very start. I simply cannot wrap my mind around tinking when there is an intricate pattern. It's like thinking backwards, or something.
I guess the solution is to very carefully follow the pattern (no absent mindedness) so no mistakes are made. It certainly does develop our patience!!

xenniferx
04-23-2009, 04:37 PM
I simply cannot wrap my mind around tinking when there is an intricate pattern. It's like thinking backwards, or something.

It's a really useful skill to acquire, though. It really saved me a few times on an intricate scarf I was making.

><

Anarfea
04-24-2009, 06:24 PM
:roflhard: See how we knitters end up putting a "k" before any word that starts with "n?" I do that all the time! :roflhard:

Hehe you are so right. :roflhard: Except I just can't spell and did that before I knitted too!