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View Full Version : Bifocals anyone?


WolfWalker
05-16-2009, 11:06 PM
I went to the eye doctor last week for my annual exam and found out I need bifocals. (Well, in truth, I needed them at last year's exam too but wanted to postpone getting them.) I picked them up today and while I'm amazed at the difference in my near sight, after wearing them all day my eyes feel sooooooo tired! Anyone else have bifocals (with line)......how long did it take your eyes to fully adjust to them? Any advise to help this transition? TIA!

Debra in NC

Denise in Michigan
05-17-2009, 12:03 AM
For me, about 8-10 days to fully adjust, but noticed after 4 that I was much more comfortable with them than the first day! My advice is just to keep them on and tough it out, except on stairs, when safety might be an issue.

Mike
05-17-2009, 12:17 AM
It took me seconds to like them.
My eyes were more tired without them.
Did they change your far prescription much? That could be where you're getting tired.

I also got the line which I think helped because when I was doing watches I turned my clip on loupe upside-down and used it like a bifocal so I was used to ignoring something that had a definite transition and looking down for close and up for far.
I've tried other people's assorted kinds and I'm glad I got lines. I can understand why my mother had problems walking with no-line and my brother's progressives really annoy me.

I suggest you sit down to a movie and some knitting. Position your head so the line is just below the screen and your knitting so it's in your bifocal. Then knit and watch the movie like you would naturally.

If you have to do much fishing around I'd question whether they placed the line in the right spot, or if your glasses aren't slipping down your nose.
It should be pretty naturally that anything in your hands or on a table is in the bifocal and everything else is in the far vision lens.

Jan in CA
05-17-2009, 01:15 AM
I actually need a mild distance prescription, but mostly reading. However, I'm sick of having to take my glasses off and on and having to look over the top to see TV or talk to someone.

Last year I got progressives (no line bifocals). My first prescription was no good so they 'fixed them'. They still didn't work for me so I had them take out the distance altogether and just had clear glass with the reading part. I ended up seeing wierd halos after wearing them for awhile if I took them off. I don't know if it was me, the glasses or what, but I gave up on those and have considered lined bifocals. I've always been put off by the line because in my mind they are for 'old' people..well I'm 56 and I don't care anymore. I just want to see better. :teehee: I'll be watching this thread! :thumbsup:

MoniDew
05-17-2009, 08:43 AM
It does take a little while to adjust. I like the kind with the line. It helps to keep my head from swimming when I switch views.

Stairs are definately an issue! Be very careful!

WolfWalker
05-17-2009, 09:59 AM
My distance part of my glasses changed just a smidge from what I've had previously. Also, I do always wear my glasses from the time I get up right through until I turn out the lights for bed. What I'm experiencing with these bifocals now is that when I'm at my computer and actually using the keyboard I find myself using the bifocal part for seeing the keyboard, then when I look up at the monitor it appears just slightly out of focus, yet if I'm just reading pages on the monitor without looking down at my keyboard the monitor is in focus. Maybe in time my eyes will adjust........

When I went to the glasses store and sat down with one of their associates we talked about the different styles of bifocals. She showed me progressives, and she told me there would be a chance of losing clarity at the far edges of the lens......something I cannot tolerate because I drive (15 ton school bus and floral delivery) for a living. That's why I ended up getting the lined bifocals. She measured where the line should go three times, each time drawing a line on my existing lens and then having me put them back on for her to see where the line fell. So I'm pretty sure it's where it should be. As I'm sitting here looking at my monitor it's above the line and my hands/part of desktop are below it. And, in truth, I actually do like having that line, it's like a physical reminder of where I "should" be positioning myself for proper use of them.

This morning my eyes aren't tired, so I'm trying to not look at my keyboard while I'm typing, just looking at my monitor while just the occasional glance at my keyboard. I researched a bit online and it stated that one shouldn't "stare" too long at anything, instead, it suggests that focusing your eyes at varying distances can help one adjust to bifocal use so I'm trying that too.

Thanks for your suggestions... :)

Debra in NC

Ellieblue
05-17-2009, 12:45 PM
I used bifocals for about 10 years and was never happy wearing them. I finally went back to single vision and reading glasses. Now, since my distant vision has greatly improved, the only time I wear my distant glasses is for driving. You are so right about the danger on stairs. I was knitting and wearing my reading glasses when my DD called me upstairs. When I turned around to return to my apartment, I missed a step and fell down the whole flight and slammed into the wall at the bottom where I broke my leg. I make sure I use the handrail from then on.

stitchabit
05-17-2009, 06:49 PM
I got progressives just 2 weeks ago. I hate them so far :wall: I have good distance and was wearing readers, but got tired of taking them on and off at work to walk around, thus the progressives. I do alot of computer work. I am having the hardest time with moving my head not my eyes to read and with losing the periphial ?? anyways not being able to see as much on the sides as I used to. I am trying to stick with them- for what I paid for them. I only need to wear them at work and maybe should use them at home to read. I don't have to wear them all of the time, but right now I am struggling with them. I wish now I had just went with stronger readers for this year and the chain around my neck - even if it is not vogue or whatever.

ArtLady1981
05-17-2009, 08:13 PM
The first time I walked out of the optometrist's office with my new pair of progressive bifocals, I about fell off the curb. It was very hard to get used to.

I tried to keep them ON at all times, but tried to avoid curbs! :teehee:

The main thing is: keep them on. You will adjust. :thumbsup:

Doublereeder2
05-17-2009, 09:24 PM
My first pair were progressive lenses. They took a while but now I love them. No lines for me :eyes:

salevy
05-17-2009, 09:49 PM
I got used to my bifocals right away. I still find my eyes get very tired.

I've had them for 6 months now.

Shari

GinnyG
05-18-2009, 09:20 AM
I have TRIFOCALS!!!!

Many years ago when I got my first pair of bifocals they talked me into progressive lenses. It was a nightmare. I spent 6 months feeling nauseous all the time and tripping over thengs.

Finally the 3rd Dr I saw told me that some people just cannot wear progressive lenses, people prone to car sickness for some reason are less able to adjust to progressive lenses. He switched me to lined bifocals and WHAT A RELIEF, within 24 hours I had adjusted and a few years ago when they added the third lens they again tried to talk me into progressive lenses but I got the lined and adjusted quickly.
There are times when they are annoying but for the most part I adjusted pretty fast.

GOOD LUCK!

OffJumpsJack
05-18-2009, 01:09 PM
It does take a little while to adjust. I like the kind with the line. It helps to keep my head from swimming when I switch views.

Stairs are definately an issue! Be very careful!

My distance part of my glasses changed just a smidge from what I've had previously. Also, I do always wear my glasses from the time I get up right through until I turn out the lights for bed. What I'm experiencing with these bifocals now is that when I'm at my computer and actually using the keyboard I find myself using the bifocal part for seeing the keyboard, then when I look up at the monitor it appears just slightly out of focus, yet if I'm just reading pages on the monitor without looking down at my keyboard the monitor is in focus. Maybe in time my eyes will adjust........

Debra in NC

:cool: (that is the only smile w/ glasses I found on my short list.)

How far to your computer screen, it may be an intermediate distance and neither the top nor the bifocal may be the correct prescription for it. Mention this to your eye-glass store and measure the distance (with your arm). Generally the object should be several inches past your finger tips for the distance (upper) lens prescription to be most helpful.

I wear lined bifocals and I've learned to tip my head up while driving to check my gauges and speed. My first pair had smaller lenses and I actually wore them lower and would look over the top for intermediate distance (conversations), through the top for computer work (my monitor is well beyond arms length) and through the bifocal for reading/keyboard.

My eye doctor asked me what I would be doing most of the time. Then we discussed the distance to the monitor. Then we selected distance for the top.

My prescription is mild, nearly the lowest possible with prismatic to correct a mild astigmatism in my left eye. I often take off my glasses for stairs and curbs! If you can't see without glasses, you will need to tuck your chin tight to your chest to see that curb or first step. After that do a quick count as you lift our head and look straight ahead. If the steps are uneven in height or slopes, then go slow, feel your way, and hold on to that railing. :oo:

;)

Debkcs
05-20-2009, 03:18 AM
Ginny, brilliant! I needed to read your post, as I've tried progressives three times now with no luck whatsoever with them. Nausea, lack of balance, etc. I have a severe astigmatism in my left eye, and the people who did the Rx could never get it right.

So, I'll go get a pair of lined bifocals, and just look like the happy ol' fart I am.

(59 on June 5th, but it feels like a hundred today!)

Quiltlady
05-20-2009, 07:34 AM
I went to the eye doctor last week for my annual exam and found out I need bifocals. (Well, in truth, I needed them at last year's exam too but wanted to postpone getting them.) I picked them up today and while I'm amazed at the difference in my near sight, after wearing them all day my eyes feel sooooooo tired! Anyone else have bifocals (with line)......how long did it take your eyes to fully adjust to them? Any advise to help this transition? TIA!

Debra in NC
I have been wearing NO line ones for over ten years. It did take me NINE days to adjust to them the very first time.

Out of trial and error when buying new frames I have found that for me I can NOT buy frames that are too small because it just distorts how I see. So for mine to work correctly I need a little larger oval frame.

Give them time to adjust but if you still are not happy GO back to where you bought them because most eye glass places guarantee your satisfaction. My daugther works at an eye glass store so I know.

cindycactus
05-20-2009, 11:48 AM
I must be extremely lucky. I have been wearing progressive lenses for almost 15 years. I don't remember having a hard time getting used to them but I had been wearing single lenses for years before that. I have had large lenses and now the smaller ones. Didn't make a difference. You do need to get used to moving your head but that only took a couple days. I have heard that many people just can't tolerate them though.

Knitting_Guy
05-21-2009, 01:55 PM
I've had bifocals for years. It does take a little time for most folks to get used to them. As the distance part is only a very slight correction I can get along fine without them except to read.

I had new ones made last year and they botched the prescription for the distance part and haven't been able to wear them. I still haven't got around to getting new ones made. I just use a $10 pair of reading glasses bought in a truck stop and they work just fine for me.

Plantgoddess+
05-21-2009, 08:58 PM
My husband and I started out with progressives and have had no problems aside from having to wear glasses at all. My eye doctor warned me that if you have started with lined lens you have a more difficult time adjusting to progressive lens. I have astigmatism as well and can't use drug store cheaters for reading at all. I climb stairs a lot throughout the day and have no problems. I do find it takes upward of a week to get used to my new prescription. I also went with glass lens instead of plastic because I spend so much time outdoors and the dust and wind scratch plastic lens very quickly.

Mike
05-21-2009, 09:08 PM
I work with a lot of abrasives and the last time they told me that plastic would be more scratch resistant. I tried it and they were actually right.

Plantgoddess+
05-21-2009, 09:14 PM
I work with a lot of abrasives and the last time they told me that plastic would be more scratch resistant. I tried it and they were actually right.
My first pair of progressives were plastic lens and I had them scratched so bad I couldn't see out of them in about 6 weeks. I had the scratch protection coating put on as well and it didn't help.
I had a plant nursery and so was always dealing with dirt and dust. I'm on my sixth pair of glass lens over the years and I don't have near the problems.
My husband is a mill wright in a metals plant and he has to wear plastic lens for safety reasons and has to replace them regularly.

Mike
05-21-2009, 11:32 PM
Hmm. When I was going through old glasses I was amazed at how bad they were scratched and pitted from fire stuff.
My present plastic ones aren't like new but they're pretty good compared. I guess I'd better stick with this eyeglass place.

christine
05-23-2009, 08:20 PM
It has been months and I am still adjuesting. I have very bad eyesight -- sometimes I can't event find where my glasses are in the AM. I knew the progressives would make me crazy despite everyont trying to talk me into them. I ended up with these little circle bifocals that are located way at the bottom. It give me plenty of room to see and when I need to see the close up . . . I just find my little bifocal. I found I hated reading with them, so off I went and got a pair of my reading prescriptions. I do hate that I couldn't get this type in the ultra thin lens. And don't really like my new glasses . . .

Shandeh
05-26-2009, 01:34 PM
I've been wearing bifocals for about 12 years now. They work fine most of the time, but I do have issues occasionally. For one thing, they don't work at all when I'm playing piano or organ. I had to get a special prescription for that, because neither of the prescriptions on my bifocals worked.

Sometimes, if I knit while wearing my bifocals, then look up at the room, things get fuzzy. So, I usually just take off my glasses if that happens. I'm still trying to work that out with my eye doctor.

tokmom
05-31-2009, 12:28 AM
What about dizziness with bi-focals? I'm to the point of getting them. I have cheaters all over the place, but get tired of digging for them or patting my head. lol.
If I look up to quickly with my drug store glasses, I get sort of dizzy and my vision takes a few seconds to adjust.

Would bifocals do the same thing? I worry about that.

Shandeh
06-01-2009, 04:12 PM
Check with your eye doctor to get the right prescription. I'm one of the unlucky ones that cannot use the readers in the pharmacy. My vision is completely different in both eyes.

When I got my bifocals for the first time, I had trouble with dizziness and nausea. They adjusted the angle of the lens, and everything was fine after that. No more problems.

WolfWalker
06-01-2009, 06:02 PM
I've had no problems at all with dizziness with these new bi-focals........I think I've finally figured out what was troubling me though......I tend to sit too closely to my computer monitor! I'm guessing that with my older glasses (not bi-focals) the prescription in them was just a tiny bit weaker and sitting where I normally do was ok. Now, with my new bi-focal glasses the computer monitor seems to be just a bit out of focus, but if I sit back away a little more the monitor is definitely in focus.

It's just a learning thing, figuring out the how's and where's and such. Oh, stairs....they don't seem to me to be a problem either. When I look down as I normally would I can see the stairs with just a bit of fuzziness, no image jumping or anything.

I really think as I get more and more used to bi-focals I'll learn to love them. At least now I can read a book without first pulling my glasses down to the end of my nose! LOL!

Debra in NC

stitchabit
06-01-2009, 08:25 PM
I returned my progressives last week and am having a good pair of prescription readers made for now. Maybe, I will try them again in a couple of years. For now, I can't deal with the nausea, blurriness and only seeing about 3 inches or so without moving me head. I still do good with readers, just will have to treat them more like permanent glasses and quit leaving them all over the place.

Plantgoddess+
06-02-2009, 07:32 PM
I found that the size of the lens with the progressives made a big difference for me. I started with large oversize frames figuring I would be able to see more with more lens. I found that I had to tip my head so much to look through various parts of the lens to get the right focal point and had difficulty going down stairs. I now wear a much smaller frame and find that I don't often have to move my head to get the right focus.
I generally have a week to 10 days adjustment period to a new prescription and then have no more problems.