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View Full Version : Un-dyeing?!


wadcorbe
08-22-2009, 04:44 PM
For the first time ever, I dyed a skein of KP superwash 100% merino worsted yarn. I tried to make it pink, but I think I used too much dye (I used Wilton's), and didn't stir in the vinegar well enough. I now have a whole skein that in some areas is super pink, and other areas kind of orangey. :?? Is there any way to bleach the colour out? Or is there a colour I could use to dye over the pink, and make it one even colour? Crossed Fingers

Tia
08-22-2009, 08:22 PM
I would just trying dyeing it pink again, but it might not end up one even color, but more variegated pinks....I really like the variegated yarns.

I also soak the yarn in vinegar water before dyeing it and then add more vinegar to the dye bath just to be sure.

LizzieK8
08-23-2009, 08:43 AM
Wiltons will often break up giving you the different color changes. Many of us like the way it makes the yarn knit it up, but as always, knitter's preference. Purple is notorious for it and creates some gorgeous violet, blue, purple, red stuff.

Sometimes you can combat the breaking up by dissolving the dye in water very well. Make sure it's completely dissolved. Put it in the dye pot and stir will, heat to almost boiling. Add soaked yarn and mix so it's all submerged. Then stir in the vinegar.

The dyes may not break up as fast before striking and you'll get orange, or they make break up less so you'll get less variation in the finished yarn.

Dyeing can change, somewhat, every time you do it depending on the circumstances...with measuring everything you can get closer, but it's hard, without being able to insure the pH of your water, and that the vinegar is exactly the same strength, etc., of getting the exact same product each time.

That's the fun of it. Aiming for one thing and sometimes getting something close but just as beautiful as what you'd imagined.

If you're totally unhappy with the yarn you have, overdyeing with a primary color may help. The ones that break apart are the secondary and tertiary colors because they are a blend of primary colors: yellow+red= orange, blue+red=purple, etc.

wadcorbe
08-23-2009, 01:05 PM
I've realized now that the Wilton colours tend to break up. I will have to knit a swatch, and see what it looks like! I bought some Kool-Aid today to give it a try. Unfortunately, here in Canada, we don't seem to have nearly as many flavours as you guys in the States do. I will have to do some experimenting, and see what I can come up with! :think:

LizzieK8
08-24-2009, 08:32 AM
You can also use regular food color and add vinegar. Just takes a lot more liquid food coloring to get a bright color.

wadcorbe
08-24-2009, 08:58 AM
You can also use regular food color and add vinegar. Just takes a lot more liquid food coloring to get a bright color.

Thanks, good to know.....:thumbsup: