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lissaplus2
12-04-2009, 02:00 PM
During the Christmas season, I knit ALOT... I get "repetitive stress" and have to quit. and then Im upset cuz I cant work on the piece and get it done so I can move on to the next present.

I just got an email from Knitting Daily (heres (http://www.knittingdaily.com/blogs/daily/archive/2009/12/04/Continental-Knitting.aspx) the link for those interested) about Continental Knitting. Im a thrower and have often entertained the idea of learning continental knitting. Im also a crocheter so a friend of mine once told me it would be very easy to learn how to knit continental and would be easier on my hands to be able to switch ways of knitting when needed. She also told me I already know how to knit continental because she watches me knit socks one inside the other. Both hands are holding yarn and working. I would just need to take the yarn outta my right hand and just knit that way and... viola yea ok i said...lol

I never tried untill....
I got this email today...they must be reading my mind that im on this computer because my hands hurt and im taking a break....HOWD THEY KNOW THAT??? LOL

Anyway... i looked up some stuff and found this (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY)
and am trying my hand at it. Its very fiddly but it was that way when i first started throwing too. I must get to know how to tention my yarn. I am pulling from how i hold my hand when i crochet. Its helping. I will get it and may be a convert? who knows but it is gonna be nice knowing how to knit in different ways. And I hear this way is faster. Maybe eventually...

I would like to hear what yall think about this subject and any tips for me in my new endevor.

Melissa

Jan in CA
12-04-2009, 02:15 PM
I can knit both ways. I taught myself continental when I was making a ribbed scarf and it was a lot easier. I also use the two handed fair isle technique. I still tend to go with english knitting when I start a new project, but that's probably because I'm very familiar with it. It's also not as slow and there's not as much movement as she makes out in that video. I knit english pretty much like this and it really is pretty fast other than the ribbing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LxuKeg3PQJw

Mommyof2andangel
12-04-2009, 02:27 PM
I learned continental and that's how I knit the most. I have some problems with my hands and it's just so so much easier for me

knittingincarolina
12-04-2009, 02:27 PM
Melissa
I switched from English to Continental, but was still having some pains in my arm. I changed the position of my hand and how I fed the yarn over my fingers and I've not had any pain since. Keep practicing and once you master that you might want to try Norwegian Purling, you don't have to move the yarn to the front to purl. It makes ribbing and seed stitch much faster for me.

Terina

globaltraveler
12-04-2009, 02:36 PM
I knit whatever way works for me at the time. I originally learned to throw, then learned to work in Continental by doing two color stranded work. (Which is weird that it's weird, because I've always been a crocheter and have no problems with the yarn in my left hand.)

I have a hard time with purling in Continental, and so mainly use it for garter stitch so I don't have to deal with it just at the moment. Right now I'm working on the Dwarven Battle Bonnet for the guys on my Christmas list, and I'm ready to scream from the boredom of endless seed stitch and garter stitch, so I'm switching up from Continental to throwing whenever I feel like stopping out of boredom. (Luckily my tension is about the same both ways.)

I imagine sooner or later I'll learn Portuguese or Norwegian or one of the other ways to deal with purling, but I'm too busy at the moment churning out Christmas presents...

malama25
12-04-2009, 03:25 PM
I knit both ways also, when it comes to gifts for christmas.... I start my knit gifts in July so it doesn't become repetetive I can put it down and throw a different project in between. I do it this way because most bulky yarns are on sale. Not only does it cut down on my spending it puts me in a good mood. I even go as far as playing christmas music to keep it light and not a chore. It is amazing sometimes the love you can put into each project. When I finish my christmas knits (gifts) I store my gifts in a box with minty smelling packaged soap. So when december comes the gifts are wrap ready. Hope this helps. I know it helps me feel prepared for the winter blues. :woot: :thumbsup:

Mike
12-04-2009, 03:35 PM
Continental (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQyJc3ED5Tg).
I can't grab the needle with my left to throw with any speed. I like the idea of English picking and flicking but I'm too used to Continental.

trvvn5
12-04-2009, 06:40 PM
I started out knitting English and then switched to Continental.

The Continental is A LOT faster. I don't really notice a difference in the rate at which I fatigue. Both of my hands get tired after a while regardless of the style that I'm knitting in. I also find ribbing to be way way way faster in continental. Switching the side that the yarn is on is just so much easier with continental. The one thing that I miss about English though is purling. Purling is easier english. If I purl over and over again my fingers will get a little tired. Although I've found a way to purl recently that doesn't require me to move my fingers, this has alleviated the purling problem. On occassion, if I'm doing stockinette, I'll use my thumb to purl. Which also makes it easier.

I think its best to learn both though. They both have their merits. But just for the record. I do almost all my knitting in continental now.

cheley
12-04-2009, 07:12 PM
Continental (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQyJc3ED5Tg).
I can't grab the needle with my left to throw with any speed. I like the idea of English picking and flicking but I'm too used to Continental. Nice video...That's the first time I have ever watched a You Tube Video that's so clear...anyway, back to the subject..I have always been an English Knitter...and have dabbled with Continental...just can't get the purl and on this particular video it seems as though "I" might not be "holding" my working yarn tight enough...is that my problem? Am I not pulling tight enough with my working yarn???:figureditout: for tension...?

melmac51
12-04-2009, 10:35 PM
I just got an email from Knitting Daily (heres (http://www.knittingdaily.com/blogs/daily/archive/2009/12/04/Continental-Knitting.aspx) the link for those interested) about Continental Knitting. Im a thrower and have often entertained the idea of learning continental knitting. Im also a crocheter so a friend of mine once told me it would be very easy to learn how to knit continental and would be easier on my hands to be able to switch ways of knitting when needed.
I never tried untill....

I got this email today...they must be reading my mind that im on this computer because my hands hurt and im taking a break....HOWD THEY KNOW THAT??? LOL


I would like to hear what yall think about this subject and any tips for me in my new endevor.

Melissa

I saw that same email today from knitting daily. I've been thinking about learning continental too. I wish it would be easier for me to learn b/c I'm a crocheter, but *sigh* I knit right-handed, and I crochet (and just about everything else) left-handed. Gonna give it a try, just the same though. Wish me luck!

lovemyknitting
12-05-2009, 12:12 AM
I have also always been a thrower and during the Christmas season I find myself sleeping about 4 hours a night because i have so many gifts to knit. I can't start my Christmas knitting in the summer months because I work 2 jobs, so I start knitting in October for Christmas and it just isnt enough time. I looked at the video and decided that i am going to try the continental way when i start my next scarf, hopefully that will be tomorrow right after i finish this Santa Hat for my daughter's American Girl doll that she is getting! SHHHHH dont tell her! :o)

zkimom
12-05-2009, 09:16 AM
I can knit both ways but I'm much faster knitting Continental since that's what I learned first. I can knit English but get all messed up with the purling. Don't ask me to do a rib with the English method -- all that flipping the yarn back and forth makes me crazy :eyes:

I like to garter stitch with the English method because I find my stitches are much more even. I knit English every now and then because it slows me down and makes me pay attention.

ArtLady1981
12-05-2009, 09:28 AM
I knit English (throw). I learned that way.

I've tried Continental. Didn't cotton to it. :pout:

However, I've found that using circs lessens hand & wrist stress.

And, using the 'right needle' for a particular yarn and stitch pattern lessens hand stress.

Rubyjane
12-05-2009, 10:08 AM
I knit Cottage Style, a version of American/English, on small projects like socks, mittens, etc. because I LOVE dpns and learned that way from my mother. On larger projects, I knit a modified Cottage Style, closer to American. I can knit Continental but find it awkward and slow...knitting cottage style I can knit as fast as any Continental knitter! I keep trying to perfect my Continental style as I think it would be very useful. I see so many styles of knitting, that I think what is right for you is right.

cheley
12-05-2009, 12:28 PM
I knit Cottage Style, a version of American/English, on small projects like socks, mittens, etc. because I LOVE dpns and learned that way from my mother. On larger projects, I knit a modified Cottage Style, closer to American. I can knit Continental but find it awkward and slow...knitting cottage style I can knit as fast as any Continental knitter! I keep trying to perfect my Continental style as I think it would be very useful. I see so many styles of knitting, that I think what is right for you is right. Interesting...please explain the technique!!!!:hug:

knitcindy
12-05-2009, 12:51 PM
I started with "throwing" with the right hand, cuz that's how my grandma taught me. Then just a couple of years ago I saw a book (and this site) that showed the Continental method and now I use that almost exclusively.

When I teach new knitters, I teach them the "Throw Method". Sometimes cabling is easier using that way too, it all depends on what feels comfortable. I have also found that it's easier to throw when I'm using needles size 35 or 50. They're too big to hold AND do the continental method at the same time.

So I go back and forth between the 2.
knitcindy

cheley
12-05-2009, 12:56 PM
Interesting...please explain the technique!!!!:hug::passedout: Wow good for you..I went ahead and found a video of that...Yikes!!!

lissaplus2
12-05-2009, 01:32 PM
WOW you guys!! This is AWSOME im soooo glad i asked that question. I have learned alot by reading your posts and have checked out all your ideas...

Rubyjane....:notworthy: I looked a couple of videos on that method and there is NO way!!

and to all of you that use both. I may be jumpin in the pool with ya.

Heres my findings.....

I am getting the hang of the knitting but purling is something imma have to have alot of work on. I keep losing my working yarn :!!!: and my left hand is getting cramped. Ill get it.

Sooooo... Ill prob knit this way on an item with alot of stockinette in the round. but for flat knitting imma prob throw because on the swatch i did, it changed my gauge when i picked my knits and threw my purls. (did that after i gave up on the purls for now) Maybe after Christmas ill do a washcloth or something with the rule that i only knit contenental on this project. Practice makes perfect yanno....

Thanks for all your comments and tips and opening up new ways of knitting for me to check out and try in the comming year. :muah: :hug:

I LOVE THIS SITE!!!!!:heart: :grphug: :heart:
Melissa

Rubyjane
12-05-2009, 05:09 PM
Cottage Style is one where the right hand needle is held like a pencil and the 2nd finger does all the work throwing the yarn. I know there is a video on it out there, and that Stephanie Purl McPhee knits this way. Its very fast and fun. I use it exclusively on small projects. When you are knitting this way the project backs up into your right hand; its really conducive only to smaller projects like socks, mittens, scarfs, etc.

Rubyjane
12-05-2009, 05:10 PM
Its really quite easy. just hold your right hand needle like a pencil...there, you've got it!

AngelaR
12-06-2009, 01:07 PM
I've watched many videos on how to knit and I can say that my style is a weird hybrid that makes purling difficult. Having watched the videos you linked I think I may have try that style since it makes sense to my "Why am I having to change the way I'm holding things when no one else is?" brain.

Thanks for the links. I don't have any problems holding my yarn or needles, but I imagine it's something that's not far off, so this is welcome.

meowmeowmeow
12-06-2009, 07:54 PM
I knit Cottage Style, a version of American/English, on small projects like socks, mittens, etc. because I LOVE dpns and learned that way from my mother. On larger projects, I knit a modified Cottage Style, closer to American. I can knit Continental but find it awkward and slow...knitting cottage style I can knit as fast as any Continental knitter! I keep trying to perfect my Continental style as I think it would be very useful. I see so many styles of knitting, that I think what is right for you is right.


I found this video on IRISH cottage knitting.She really IS lightning fast.

Crazy Knitting Lady (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8o00ux6zPiE)

I also found this video: Crazy Knitting Lady II (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P51GByV0H2w&feature=related)

GinnyG
12-07-2009, 09:50 AM
I knit both English and Continenetal and prefer English hands down. I use Continental when double stranding. I don't think that fact you knit English or Continental makes any difference in repetative stress injuries. Repetative stress is caused by the same motion over and over whether it is English or continental.

More important is how you hold your body, whether you are doing which method properly and that you take reaks to stretch at regular intervals.

My LYS has a 3 hour class that is offerred several times a year on Knitting ergonomics.

I find that when I am knitting non stop, as I am now, it's my neck and shoulders that hurt. My hands may ache but once I start knitting they limber up.

KnitandPurl
12-07-2009, 10:22 AM
Like Melissa, I've been crocheting a long time and I only just started to learn to knit in the last month or so.

I tried the English way but my right hand didn't want to hold the yarn and I got annoyed at having to take my hand off the needle to wrap. So knitting Continental is much more like the hand position I was used to in crochet.

But I don't understand why all the knitting books say Continental is better for left handers. If I had been a left handed crocheter, I think I'd like English better.

WandaT
12-08-2009, 10:14 AM
I was a crocheter most of my life - and I'm a left hander who crochets right handed ... because my mom taught me and she's right handed. I guess I was so young when she taught me that it wasn't a problem. However, I guess I may be more ambidexterous (sp?) than I thought because I mainly eat and write with my left hand. I iron (on the rare ocassion I actually iron), wash dishes, cut with scissors, etc with my right hand. Maybe that because I'm pushing 50 (next year) and back then there weren't as many left handed conveniences? I don't know. Anyway, since I had crocheted for years, holding the yarn in my right hand just didn't feel right. I tried. When I switched to holding it in my left hand it felt much better. I hold the yarn the same way for both knitting and crocheting.

Jan in CA
12-08-2009, 10:59 AM
I am right handed and was a crocheter first, too. I tried continental and it just didn't click. English worked much better. I can now do both ways and I find it handy for ribbing and fair isle, but I wish continental knitters would quit saying their way is faster and better. Some english knitters are very fast. It's really all in the way you hold the yarn and needles as well as your natural speed. :thumbsup:

KnitandPurl
12-08-2009, 11:50 AM
That's interesting, WandaT, I was left-handed till the age of 3 when I was forcibly changed. I may be a bit ambidextrous.

Jan, I'm still incredibly slow (at least to me) even though I knit Continental. But I'm comparing it to crocheting.

OffJumpsJack
12-08-2009, 04:06 PM
I knit with both hands, and sometimes backwards. :thumbsup:

I started with crochet.

Most of the time I knit like the continental video you linked in your OP, but I like to keep my fingers close to the needle. Sometimes just the index finger like she said not to do. Hey sometimes that easier.

Less often I will knit from the right like the vid that Jan linked. When I do you can bet it is because my left hand is bothering me. Either that or I have yarn in both hand doing a fair isle pattern.

Sometimes I have trouble with my hands; I may get numbness and pain from the elbows down. I stop and shake out my arms to relax my forearms and that helps but I usually have to take a break soon after the pain and numbness sets in.

Sometimes when the "yarn entropy" gets too great :nails: I toss the project in my canvas sac and stuff the whole thing in my backpack for a timeout. When it has become more compliant I will then pull it back out and again archive balance. I think yarn is afraid of the lonely, dark in my backpack. ;)

I fight entropy one stitch at a time. Every stitch and row is a win, every tink or frog a step backwards. Sometimes I think a project would be well served to be tossed in the fire place until the acrylic burns and melts down to a fuming black lump. Oh, I haven't done that but I think about it. Yea, once or twice.

Like a gambler: you've got to know when to hold it, and you've got to know when to fold it. 'cause every WIP's a winner and every WIP's a looser and the best that you can hope for is to knit your last knit. :doh:

Did I really just type all that? LOL

What was that phrase I coined a while back, ambidextrous interweavous perhaps.

blueygh2
12-08-2009, 04:59 PM
Well well, I've been knitting continental for some time now. When I started, I did english style, and my sister taught me, but I found it troublesome to switch between knitting and purling and choose continental for the facility. I'm crocheting as well, so all flows well....

RuthieinMaryland
12-09-2009, 01:00 PM
Hi!

The video you listed is the perfect instruction for continental. One of the things she most stresses is that the yarn needs to lie over the TOP of the left hand fingers. This is crucial and makes knitting life so much easier!!!

I used to knit english style but decided to teach myself continental and fortunately found the video you attached. What a treat! Now when I knit continental projects just move along very fast without my intentionally pushing the speed.

I, too, tried knitting one piece inside another (what great fun!). They were leg warmers so I didn't have to fiddle with increases and decreases which made it easier to learn. I managed to hold both strands of yarn in my left hand, separating them just a little so they'd be easier to pick up, and the project just flew along! And with very little stress. Which, I guess, is a very key element to getting projects done. If you don't have to keep stopping to rest and can just flow along things get done!

I know it's very awkward to try out a new style of knitting but believe me - once you get over the fumble-fingers it's so worth it to learn continental.

Happy knitting and Merry Christmas!

Ruthie

laikabear
12-11-2009, 01:23 AM
I only know how to knit Continental but it doesn't stop me from getting "knitter's claw" when I knit a lot... Right now I'm taking a break from my knitting because my left thumb is sore and my left index finger has a notch in it from tensioning the working yarn!

It might be nice to switch back and forth if you can do both styles, but then again, it might change your gauge. I'd be careful if switching mid-project.

I really wish I knew how to do that Irish Cottage Knitting. Man she is fast!!! Even when they slowed down the video I couldn't tell what is going on.

offgridgirl
12-11-2009, 11:37 PM
I think I learned the continental way but I had a friend in Germany teach me her way and it was faster. I use these gloves to help to ease some of the pain. I get a new pair each year!!:mrgreen:
http://domeproductsonline.com/contents/en-us/d7.html

MerigoldinWA
12-27-2009, 03:37 PM
Jan, I know a lot of Continental knitters say it is a faster way to knit than English. The records show that both Continental and English knitters win world speed competitions. But I think when some of us say it is faster we mean it is faster for us. I know I have done (and still do) both and I find that for myself Continental is faster overall, especially for any sort of work that switches between knits and purls. I understand that some folks can manage those changes very well with English knitting, but I couldn't. We are just all different.

To the question, "how do YOU knit?".... I started out English and didn't know any other ways existed. Then I was exposed to Continental after many years of being an English knitter. I decided to switch and am glad I did. For me it is is much easier on my hands, but there are still repetition issues.

I use both when I do stranded color work, but I'm trying to learn to do that holding both colors in the left hand, so far I still find it faster to use both hands.

I've dabbled with Combined knitting and like its ease of performance, but my knitting doesn't look right when I knit that way. I don't know why, I wish it looked better and I'd use it more. Also I don't know how to do the fancier stuff using that method.

I just learned Eastern knitting last night and think it might be the easiest of all with a little practice. I still have the issues of "how do you do the fancier stuff" with that method.

I can knit backwards as well, albeit slowly, it comes in handy at times and I have actually used it in projects to do stranded color work flat so that I could always have the right side facing, and for bobbles.

It is amazing there are so many different ways to do the same thing. Just fascinating. And they are all good, some just work better for different people.

JoeE
12-27-2009, 10:07 PM
I think English knitting looks so elegant, but I just can't keep my tension consistent when I knit that way. I wish I could, because it would make stranded knitting do-able. Thank goodness Continental was pretty easy to pick up. For a lot of years, I kind of knit English, but I dropped the yarn after I wrapped it around the needle, so it took FOREVER. After I was exposed to Continental (from KH videos), I was so excited to learn how to do it.

Jan in CA
12-28-2009, 01:09 PM
Jan, I know a lot of Continental knitters say it is a faster way to knit than English. The records show that both Continental and English knitters win world speed competitions. But I think when some of us say it is faster we mean it is faster for us.

I know most of the people who say it do mean for them, but not everyone means it that way. I felt pressure to learn the "better" way when I was a new knitter when what I needed to hear is that there are different ways to accomplish the same thing and there is no one right way. We all need to do what works for us personally. I can knit continental, but for me it's harder on my hands that english knitting. ;)

trvvn5
12-28-2009, 01:21 PM
I only know how to knit Continental but it doesn't stop me from getting "knitter's claw" when I knit a lot... Right now I'm taking a break from my knitting because my left thumb is sore and my left index finger has a notch in it from tensioning the working yarn!

It might be nice to switch back and forth if you can do both styles, but then again, it might change your gauge. I'd be careful if switching mid-project.

I really wish I knew how to do that Irish Cottage Knitting. Man she is fast!!! Even when they slowed down the video I couldn't tell what is going on.


My tension is very different depending on if I knit English or Continental. My English is tighter.

MesaVerde
12-28-2009, 04:55 PM
In the book I learned from, I learned how to use straight needles in English style. I like that style, and it easily transferres to Circular and DPNS.

Sarah6485
12-28-2009, 05:00 PM
I am a new knitter (on my 2nd project, a cabled scarf for a friend) and I knit English, simply b/c that's how I was taught. Continental looks too complicated to me honestly, and I'm fine with how I knit now. I'm getting consistently faster so I'm not too worried about speed at the moment. I do sometimes cramp up in my wrists/forearms, but I imagine that could happen with either style of knitting. Maybe when I've mastered throwing then I might try continental.

G J
12-28-2009, 10:33 PM
I knit Portuguese style (http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=chuanavit#grid/uploads). It's much easier on my hands and much faster. I learned English first, but b/c of hand issues, had to learn a new way. This was easy to adapt to and purling is a breeze!

OffJumpsJack
12-29-2009, 02:58 PM
I knit Portuguese style (http://www.youtube.com/profile?user=chuanavit#grid/uploads). It's much easier on my hands and much faster. I learned English first, but b/c of hand issues, had to learn a new way. This was easy to adapt to and purling is a breeze!

Something new for me to learn. :) That's like free candy to me. Sweet but burns calories instead of adding them. :oops:

Yep, I'm a knitting geek.

Rosey2376
12-31-2009, 07:20 PM
I LOVED that youtube video. Thanks :muah:

I looked at the knittinghelp videos, because I was curious about continental. I learnt to knit from my Mum (English way), and my knitting friends all knit English, but ribbing and seed stitch BUGGED me; all that swapping sides.

I tried continental from the videos, but it got WAY tight, I couldn't tension it and my left thumb got cramp. But I think that youtube might fix some of that.

I was gonna give up, but you've encouraged me, think I'll try again :thumbsup:

G J
12-31-2009, 07:29 PM
YAY! Portuguese knitting makes ribbing SO much faster!

RubyRainfall
01-02-2010, 08:07 AM
I knit Cottage Style, a version of American/English, on small projects like socks, mittens, etc. because I LOVE dpns and learned that way from my mother. On larger projects, I knit a modified Cottage Style, closer to American. I can knit Continental but find it awkward and slow...knitting cottage style I can knit as fast as any Continental knitter! I keep trying to perfect my Continental style as I think it would be very useful. I see so many styles of knitting, that I think what is right for you is right.

I am from England and everyone I know knits this way.
Watching that "Crazy Knitting Lady" video is like watching my Mum knit.
I dont understand where all the names have come from originally, English knitting isnt like any English knitting I have ever seen so far. :rofl:

OffJumpsJack
01-04-2010, 06:03 PM
I am from England and everyone I know knits this way.
Watching that "Crazy Knitting Lady" video is like watching my Mum knit.
I dont understand where all the names have come from originally, English knitting isnt like any English knitting I have ever seen so far. :rofl:

Well, your biscuits look like cookies to me, and I swear your chips are really French fries. ;)

It seems Brits call all desserts, pudding; even when they aren't a custard, erm, I mean a pudding. ;)

Somethings get lost in translation, other details are lost by many exchanges of instructions from generation to generation. Language is not constant, it changes and evolves much like the living communities that use it.

It is often quite difficult to read old text (counting hundreds of years) even when they are written in one's own language because new words have been created, usage and meanings have changed, and some words fall out of use or are replaced.

ArtLady1981
01-07-2010, 04:30 PM
A lot. :teehee: