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View Full Version : My grandma gave me a spinning wheel. Can anyone help me use it?


rwd1105
01-06-2010, 11:35 PM
I'll just start by saying I've never spun before in my life. BUT

My grandma just gave me a Louet Victoria spinning wheel Model S96. Which I figured out how to set up. (maybe?)

Does anyone know of a video, or website that can help me get started spinning?
I think I have the basic idea, but every time the yarn spins, it doesn't go on the bobbin, it just spins to much and then breaks.

cacunn
01-07-2010, 12:58 AM
I don't spin (yet) and suggest that www.joyofhandspinning.com/ (http://www.joyofhandspinning.com/) might help.

As I understand the tension on the bobbin may be to tight. To get the yarn to wrap on the bobbin you relax the tension on the yarn and the difference in the resistance between the flyer and the bobbin allows the yarn to wrap around the bobbin.

mullerslanefarm
01-07-2010, 01:47 AM
I wish the Louet site was as helpful as the Ashford site.... There is a Louet Victoria page http://www.louet.com/spinning_weaving/victoria.shtml, but it is for selling the wheel and not helpful at all.

It looks to be a bobbin drive (i.e. Irish tension). I've not spun on an Irish Tension wheel, only Scotch tension and double drives. Look around on the joy of handspinning site (mentioned before) for Irish tension to see what you need to adjust for a take in on the bobbin.

MattttaM
01-20-2010, 04:53 AM
Don't get discouraged, there's a learning curve to any worthwhile past-time. Didn't learn to read in a month did you? And look what pleasure and use you get out of that daily. There are a multitude of YOUTUBE videos on spinning both beginner basics and advanced techniques. A little research and time spent learning and you'll be spinning circles around that spindle in no time. :P

Best of luck with your wheel. It's a lovely model.

fluffybunny
02-03-2010, 06:28 PM
You should have a tensioning device on your wheel. The most common tensioning is Scotch tension where a piece of string goes from the "mother of all" on one side across a special groove on the bobbin and down to the other side where it is adjusted with a "key" shaped piece that turns in a hold, held by friction. This creates a drag so that the bobbin actually spins a bit slower than the flyer and this difference makes the yarn draw in. There is also Irish tension which reverses this, flyer tensioned and bobbin freer. Finally there is the double drive method where the bobbin and flyer are both driven with the same string, but due to different diameters, the difference is achieved. The "mother of all" can be adjusted by pulling it away from the wheel or allowing it to go toward the wheel, (either traditional or castle type wheels.)

If you send us a picture, we can tell you what type of tensioner your wheel has and how to adjust it.
Donna

fluffybunny
02-03-2010, 06:32 PM
I believe Irish tension is adjusted just like Scotch tension is. I know the Roberta electric spinner has Irish tensioning. You might study it for clues. You should find somewhere something that can be adjusted to slow down your flyer (or your bobbin if it is Scotch tension). You play with this adjustment until you get enough "draw in" that your yarn doesn't overspin.

Here is a good site for showing the differences. Hope it helps.
http://www.fibrecrafts.com/resource/fact_file/spinning/types_wheel.asp