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View Full Version : Am I too hard on my needles?


sorifes
01-17-2010, 08:13 PM
So I was sitting there last night watching a movie knitting away on a harbor scarf (which looks really cool by the way) and SNAP!!! my plastic needle in my right hand broke. Of course I was lucky that the store was still open rushed out and bought a new pair. This is not the first time I have broken needles. The last time was totally my fault, bamboo needles with yarn too thick but this time I was just floored it happened because I didn't think I was knitting that hard.

Should I just stick to metal needles (and let them bend hahaha) or am I just being too hard on my needles? Is there a cure for being too rough with them because when I go it doesn't feel like it to me. Has anyone else had this happen?

I was using the susan bates plastic needles at that time. I have a bunch of metal susan bates and they don't even bend' I'm just at a loss of what to do about my 'problem' that could become eventually expensive.

Ingrid
01-17-2010, 08:22 PM
Do you not like metal needles? It really doesn't matter if they bend.

Or you might want to consider a circular set. You can use them for anything, and you never hear about the tips breaking.

Jan in CA
01-17-2010, 09:18 PM
Do you knit tight? Maybe that has something to do with it. I've never heard of metal needles having a problem so maybe that's what you'll have to do.

Try not to hold the needles so tightly either. You can use a light grip on them.

sorifes
01-17-2010, 10:10 PM
I do use metal needles but it's sometimes hard to find the 9 or 10 inch long ones for the size I need. I hate knitting with the 14 inchers when it's just a scarf.

I had to buy bamboo ones to replace the plastic ones but I figure since they're 9's and not 4's I should be okay.

jess_hawk
01-17-2010, 10:32 PM
I knit incredibly tightly (as in, I don't often knit with bamboo or wood needles because I physically cannot get the yarn off the needle) and have only ever broken one bamboo needle... and that was a dpn that I sat on (oops). I do wind up with a lot of bent metal needles in the smaller sizes, and I yanked the cable out of a circ once.
So what I'm saying is, unless you have a wierd way of holding the needle or have consistantly broken needles (the other break doesn't sound like it was part of a trend), I would guess that this is just a fluke.

Crycket
01-17-2010, 10:32 PM
I knit pretty tight...and I have not to date snapped a set of needles...is it possible the ones you were using could have been brittle?

I did once break the tip off of a knitlight...but those, IMHO were crap anyway....

kellyh57
01-18-2010, 11:23 AM
I broke some of the Susan Bate's plastics. I liked them because I knit in the car and didn't have to worry about stabbing someone or something in the event of an accident or sudden stop. I was knitting dishcloths and the cotton is so stiff with little give that it broke the tip right off. I wasn't too disappointed since the needles were ultra cheap, but they were a set and I couldn't just go replace that one size. Basically, the cheaper the needle, the easier to break! I use Denise all the time and have yet to break them but they are resin and have a little bend to them. Just be careful with the cheap plastic needles if you use them. I use bamboo DPNs that are super small and haven't broken them yet either, but it's fingering weight yarn that has some give to it too.

AngelaR
01-18-2010, 12:42 PM
I do use metal needles but it's sometimes hard to find the 9 or 10 inch long ones for the size I need. I hate knitting with the 14 inchers when it's just a scarf.

I had to buy bamboo ones to replace the plastic ones but I figure since they're 9's and not 4's I should be okay.

You obviously don't live in Texas... that is ALL you can find and have to order anything smaller online. Of course, the same goes for smaller size circs. I guess we do like everything bigger here in Texas.

My guess is that A) it's winter and cold in quite a few places in the world and B) you may be knitting a bit tightly is your keep breaking plastics and bend metal.