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View Full Version : Going to real live yarn shop


N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 12:46 PM
Here in Denver... www.thelambshoppe.com

You may have surmised that I am a n0ob when it comes to knitting. So far, I have three sets of straights (two metal, one bamboo) various and sundry yarn, including some 2nd hand stuff I bought in a big bag. That's it.

What should I look for at ye olde yarn shoppe? Halp. :knitting:

AngelaR
02-23-2010, 01:13 PM
One of my favorite people just told me that a real live yarn shop is opening across the street from his salon in Austin. I told him to get ready for me to move in. :wink:

N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 01:28 PM
HEhehe. Should I get circular needles? DPNs? Moar yarn? I has no clue. So far, I've gone to Michael's and it's slim pickins there, except for yarns on sale...

etoilechaude
02-23-2010, 01:36 PM
I think it would be a good idea to have a project in mind, maybe find a hat pattern you like? Then you would know what weight yarn you wanted and what size/length circulars and/or dpns you need.

My first trip to a real LYS I walked in knowing I wanted to make a scarf with bulky yarn, and I knew I wanted natural fiber that didn't cost a fortune. The people were SUPER helpful and helped me pick out a wool/alpaca bulky yarn that was on sale for $3/skein.

I think as long as you have a project in mind you can ask for help and *hopefully* get some really great service!

N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 01:41 PM
I want to knit hmm probably a scarf. I've done a dishcloth so far lol. I'm knitting a random thing currently that may become a scarf. I think I would like to knit socks in the future too. Maybe they can suggest a really easy pattern for n0obs?

trvvn5
02-23-2010, 02:31 PM
Oh good God. Have a project in mind before you go. If I walked into a yarn store without a project in mind I'd walk out bankrupt.

Jan in CA
02-23-2010, 02:34 PM
Yea! LYS are fun to visit and hang out in. Most are friendly welcoming places for newbies. For your first time I suggest two things for this first trip...

1. Find a pattern you want to use so you can choose the appropriate weight yarn and needles. If you just want to make a garter stitch or simple scarf then know what weight yarn you want. The yarn weight will dictate needle size.
2. Just have fun looking around!

On my daughter's first trip to a LYS she bought a pair of Addi circulars and yarn for the Yarn Harlot Scarf (http://www.yarnharlot.ca/blog/archives/2006/10/12/one_row_handspun_scarf.html). It was her first time using circs and now she's a convert. Haha! They are pricey, but if you don't mind spending that much for one pair it's a good choice. You can always get Options later or whatever later. That's a good, easy pattern btw. I've used it several times with various weight yarns.
Here's the Rav link for the scarf. (http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/library/one-row-handspun-scarf)

The best place to learn to knit socks is here because she's got great photos for every step of the pattern
http://www.cometosilver.com/socks/

The ones to learn with are either DPN or two circular. Once you have a pair made you can move on to two at one time if you want...(I prefer two knit SEPARATELY at the same time using two circulars for each one.) I learned on the DPN one though.

N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 04:38 PM
Thanks guys...they ignored me lol. Didn't buy anything.

Jaxhil
02-23-2010, 06:13 PM
:noway: :??

What??!! No Way! Well, that stinks! I can't believe they would do that~but it's their loss, I guess.

Are there any other LYS nearby? If not, there's always the internet, though you can't play with the goodies first! :teehee: Well, hopefully you'll find something soon for your next project!

N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 06:23 PM
Yeah, BF and I were wandering around, me, eyeballing yarn, looking lost/confused. Lots of employees in the shop. Not so much as a hello. I think yarn shops are few and far between where I live, Vancouver, BC, though I know of a shop that carries a little knitting stuff (they're mostly needlework/cross stitch) but they know my mother and I very well so I don't feel intimidated/weird in their shop, though it's an hour + via public transit for me to get there.

CivicSista
02-23-2010, 06:41 PM
I know what you mean about people ignoring you while in LYS, happened to me the first time I went into one too.

Abby123
02-23-2010, 07:33 PM
Wow, how disappointing that they weren't more friendly especially after a trip that long.

Are you still looking for ideas on a next project? I think a hat on 16" circulars. Or socks, worked magic loop on longer circulars, are a good progression. There are boot sock patterns worked on larger needles (like a size 6), if you are concerned about knitting on tiny needles.

Read over your basics, an other good tool to have is a crochet hook. You can get one cheaply at Michaels. I like the inox brand (don't know if they carry it.) But a hook is very handy for fixing mistakes, picking up stitches, etc. And doesn't cost alot.

Belphoebe
02-23-2010, 08:05 PM
That is just awful. How can you open a shop related to knitting and not befriendly? Argh!! I hope you find a friendlier lys soon. It makes all the difference!

AngelaR
02-23-2010, 08:51 PM
Oh good God. Have a project in mind before you go. If I walked into a yarn store without a project in mind I'd walk out bankrupt.

Truer words were never spoken. http://fc03.deviantart.net/fs21/f/2007/288/a/5/It__s_the_truth_by_de_Mote.gif

N0obKnitter
02-23-2010, 10:07 PM
Wow, how disappointing that they weren't more friendly especially after a trip that long.

Are you still looking for ideas on a next project? I think a hat on 16" circulars. Or socks, worked magic loop on longer circulars, are a good progression. There are boot sock patterns worked on larger needles (like a size 6), if you are concerned about knitting on tiny needles.

Read over your basics, an other good tool to have is a crochet hook. You can get one cheaply at Michaels. I like the inox brand (don't know if they carry it.) But a hook is very handy for fixing mistakes, picking up stitches, etc. And doesn't cost alot.

Oh! I didn't even know mistakes (further down the project) could be fixed. The random thing I'm knitting (may turn out to be a scarf) has some kinda boo boo several rows down from where I'm currently at, which makes me :( since the rest of it is nearly perfect.

Abby123
02-23-2010, 10:26 PM
Oh! I didn't even know mistakes (further down the project) could be fixed. The random thing I'm knitting (may turn out to be a scarf) has some kinda boo boo several rows down from where I'm currently at, which makes me :( since the rest of it is nearly perfect.

Yep, you can fix mistakes with a hook. Say you knit where you wanted to purl. Work across to the stitch above the mistake. Then slide that stitch off the needle (so it dangles free.) Unwork the stitches down back to the error. And use the hook to pull the loops back up in the correct manner. A video would probably make more sense than my description. But yeh, a hook is a handy tool.

suzeeq
02-23-2010, 10:51 PM
There's some videos on the Tips page under... Fixing Mistakes... that will show you how to do it.

Jan in CA
02-24-2010, 01:27 AM
Yeah, that's why I said "most" yarn shops are friendly and welcoming. Unfortunately not all of them are. It could have been that something was going on and if you were in the area you might try again, but some just aren't good that way. It's too bad. :(

I did find this if it's any help.
http://www.vancouveryarn.com/id45.html

There are several Vancouver groups on Rav that could help you, too.

trvvn5
02-24-2010, 08:14 AM
All people are different. You're going to find all types of people own LYS. We have about 4 or 5 within a 40 mile radius here in Harrisburg. The one lady who I always see at one LYS is really helpful, but comes across snobby. Another lady at another one knows practically nothing, but man can she help you find what you want and she's super nice. And then there's the crazy lady who works another of the yarn stores who is just nuts. She's SUPER nice and really helpful, but I always stay a little more than arms length away because seriously I have no idea when she's going to grab me and I don't if she did if she would just hug me or bite my ear.

N0obKnitter
02-24-2010, 02:37 PM
Wow, how disappointing that they weren't more friendly especially after a trip that long.

Are you still looking for ideas on a next project? I think a hat on 16" circulars. Or socks, worked magic loop on longer circulars, are a good progression. There are boot sock patterns worked on larger needles (like a size 6), if you are concerned about knitting on tiny needles.

Read over your basics, an other good tool to have is a crochet hook. You can get one cheaply at Michaels. I like the inox brand (don't know if they carry it.) But a hook is very handy for fixing mistakes, picking up stitches, etc. And doesn't cost alot.

Yeah, that's why I said "most" yarn shops are friendly and welcoming. Unfortunately not all of them are. It could have been that something was going on and if you were in the area you might try again, but some just aren't good that way. It's too bad. :(

I did find this if it's any help.
http://www.vancouveryarn.com/id45.html

There are several Vancouver groups on Rav that could help you, too.

You = rules.

Jan in CA
02-24-2010, 04:08 PM
You = rules.

Does that mean I rule? :?? If so thanks! :lol:

N0obKnitter
02-24-2010, 04:43 PM
Yes. It's a mathematical equation (bear in mind I suck at math) you equal rules. :D

insp30305
02-27-2010, 12:52 AM
Couple of things I can't live without for knitting are stitch seperaters (little rings that slip on the needle between stitches to let me know where I am in the pattern.) and a row counter, again with a loop that lets me insert it at the beginning of the row so I always know where I am in the pattern. And eventually you will run into a pattern with cables. So at least one cable needle. And of course matching sets of dpn's for each size of needle I use. Just in case. ;) Never know when they will come in handy. Oh, and needle guards. I have a cat. Which means sometimes there are fights over the yarn. And stitches get pulled off. The needle guards go on the end of the needles when I'm away from the work to prevent that from happening. I likes the fun tools that make the work go smoothly. :woot:

N0obKnitter
02-27-2010, 01:27 PM
I already got needle guards as I stabbed a hole in my canvas bag with my pointy-as-heck needles lol.