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igklico
02-27-2010, 08:28 PM
I know at some point this thread must have been made before, but I did do a search for it and found little or nothing pertinent.

Onto the eternal question: Which is better?

Or rather what are some of the pro's and cons of both? I learned the English method, and I am thinking of trying continental. This has lead me to wonder if any of you have experience with both, and would like to share your opinions about either/both. Please be specific.

-Igklico:mrgreen:

Jan in CA
02-27-2010, 08:41 PM
Oh boy... One is not better than the other, they are just different ways of getting to the same point. Some people find continental faster, but there are many who are amazingly fast with English. Knowing both methods is of value for things like stranded knitting so by all means give it a try.

N0obKnitter
02-27-2010, 09:08 PM
I know at some point this thread must have been made before, but I did do a search for it and found little or nothing pertinent.

Onto the eternal question: Which is better?

Or rather what are some of the pro's and cons of both? I learned the English method, and I am thinking of trying continental. This has lead me to wonder if any of you have experience with both, and would like to share your opinions about either/both. Please be specific.

-Igklico:mrgreen:

Continental is easier for me...

AngelaR
02-27-2010, 09:54 PM
Knit combined, it's way easier... no wait... Eastern Style! YES!

I hate it when the imp wins. http://fc01.deviantart.net/fs27/f/2008/034/c/2/_naughty__by_crula.gif

zkimom
02-27-2010, 10:07 PM
Try them both. Get good at both. Then decide for yourself.

suzeeq
02-27-2010, 11:44 PM
I agree with Jan. Neither is inherently better than the other, it's the one that works best for you. Try them both out.

jpenguin
02-28-2010, 09:32 PM
I agree with Jan & suzeeq. Neither one is better then the other. It is which ever is easiest for you & that you are more comfortable with.

When I started out throwing for me was harder because I actually was a crocheter for 20 years before learning to knit. As soon as my teacher found that out she told me to hold my yarn like I was crocheting & walaah I was knitting much better.

Just keep trying both & find out which one is more comfortable for you. Good Luck!

igklico
02-28-2010, 10:19 PM
Thanks for the imput

Jan in CA
03-01-2010, 12:10 AM
When I started out throwing for me was harder because I actually was a crocheter for 20 years before learning to knit. As soon as my teacher found that out she told me to hold my yarn like I was crocheting & walaah I was knitting much better.



I was also a crocheter for many years and found english easier. :lol:

McKnitty
03-01-2010, 12:30 AM
I learned English but changed to Continental after a couple of years. It seems to be easier on my hands and wrists, and I seem to knit a little quicker (it is so quick to change from knit to purl when you are working ribbing).

I think it is a good idea to learn both. It can come in handy if you do a lot of color knitting (you can knit with a different color in each hand).

mathwizard
03-01-2010, 08:47 AM
I was taught English by my mother and still knit mainly English. I have tried continental using the knit stitch and it is kind of like doing a crochet stitch and is fast but I tend to knit really tight using continental and my work suffers. I mainly English because I have excellent gauge using it.

trvvn5
03-01-2010, 09:38 AM
I learned English but changed to Continental after a couple of years. It seems to be easier on my hands and wrists, and I seem to knit a little quicker (it is so quick to change from knit to purl when you are working ribbing).

I think it is a good idea to learn both. It can come in handy if you do a lot of color knitting (you can knit with a different color in each hand).

This is what I did as well. I learned english because that is the only way that the person who taught me knew how to do. Later in years a friend of mine said that he knit continental so I gave it a try. I just work better on continental. So thats what I stick with, but I can do either one. I think its good to know how to do both.

suzeeq
03-01-2010, 10:36 AM
I have tried continental using the knit stitch and it is kind of like doing a crochet stitch and is fast but I tend to knit really tight using continental and my work suffers.

If you're 'grabbing' the yarn like you do with crocheting, you'd be wrapping the yarn around the needle backwards which would make the sts twisted and they're tighter than regular stitches.

igklico
03-01-2010, 01:02 PM
Thanks McKnitty, "(you can knit with a different color in each hand)" That was exactly the sort of input I was looking for.

AngelaR
03-01-2010, 01:08 PM
I also wrap my yarn around my needle, rather than grabbing it and pulling it through the loop. Since I knit combined and eastern, I had to learn to be careful about which way I was wrapping (clockwise vs counter). I've finally found my groove, thanks to the folks here and just spending a lot of time watching my stitches and how they looked once off the needle.

This is proof that I have way too much time on my hands now that I've settled into semi-retirement.