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View Full Version : Men who knit.. what do you think?


ChristiBerrymomma
06-07-2010, 05:59 PM
My husband doesn't knit but he does sew and can make a mean batch of cookies. I love that he can be a big hunk of a guy and still take enjoyment in the more delicate things...
So.. recently I saw a man knitting and I thought, OH MY WOW! :inlove:
(I could have been ovulating) but I thought that was just about the sexiest thing ever.:heart:

What do you think?
Sexy?
Or just feminine?

ChristiBerrymomma
06-07-2010, 06:22 PM
LOL
I just saw the Addi video thread. Too funny.

Jan in CA
06-07-2010, 07:33 PM
We have a lot of men in here in the forum. :thumbsup:

bambi
06-07-2010, 10:07 PM
Guys who knit are cool! :guyknitting: :cool:

badboy1cdx
06-07-2010, 10:35 PM
Now I know how it feels for you women to be looked at like a piece of meat! :roflhard:

I'm a guy, so obviously I have no idea how the female mind works :shudders: , but I can say that I get a lot more female attention when I'm knitting than when I'm not...:thumbsup:

badboy1cdx
06-07-2010, 10:41 PM
Now I know how it feels for you women to be looked at like a piece of meat! :roflhard:

I'm a guy, so obviously I have no idea how the female mind works :shudders: , but I can say that I get a lot more female attention when I'm knitting than when I'm not...:thumbsup:

saracidaltendencies
06-07-2010, 11:01 PM
I don't think of them any differently than I do a woman who knits...Probably because I'm used to there being a lot of guy knitters here on the forum...I pretty much think it's awesome when I see anyone knitting...lol

etoilechaude
06-08-2010, 01:46 AM
I don't think of them any differently than I do a woman who knits...Probably because I'm used to there being a lot of guy knitters here on the forum...I pretty much think it's awesome when I see anyone knitting...lol

Totally!!! :)

hyperactive
06-08-2010, 08:24 AM
I try to make my husband start. But he looks scared. Well, I see my chance. He was looking at my sewing dubiously for quite a while. And all of a sudden I am coming home and he made part of this carneval costume (technically correct and double seamed). And then a year or so later, he is sewing ultra lightweight stuff sacks for camping, developing into rain tarp, and this summer he will sew a whole tent from scratch.
So, one day I will get him knitting. :D
I sew few men (live) who knit around here. Even though almost all German boys and girls learn basic knitting in school. (my husband is American, so he missed out on that :D)

But I have gotten a lot of attention from guys (e.g. on trains) when I knit away... they always ask me about the technical attitudes...

N0obKnitter
06-08-2010, 08:44 AM
That's cool they teach knitting in schools there!

MMario
06-08-2010, 09:12 AM
While I certainly don't mind getting attention from women when they see me knitting, the ones who bother me are the ones who act like it's something unusual. Men knitting was *NOT* unusual at all until post world war II.

MoniDew
06-08-2010, 10:17 AM
all I can say is:

Russell Crowe

Knitting
http://www.extremezone.com/%7Ebinky/graphic/rcwp3-800.jpg

:faint:

hyperactive
06-08-2010, 10:43 AM
I remember a tourist group in a fishing museum in the north of Iceland (yup, was there, more than once ;) )
they heard that the men were sewing their own waterproof leather outfits.... several middle aged women (group dumbness sticking out their ears)..: "Oh my god! Did their wifes die, or why did they attemt that? The outfits must have been all horrible!"

The tourists were German and I did my best to not seem German (which is kind of hard when you are) and forgot my mother tongue. They had other comments along those lines, too.



To schools: In elementary school crafts German kids almost always do some knitting (knits, purls, usually becomes a snake or something), crocheting (we did some simple pot holder or so), weaving (don't ask me what that was supposed to be in the end) and stitching.

In my high school there was a girl class for crafts (mandatory, though) and we did some elaborate window-decoration crochet, corchet a shopping net, knit a pullover (mine lacks sleves to this day, putting me in trauma ;) ) and sewed a skirt.

The elementary school stuff is mandatory for all kids though, as far as I know.

I did know all these crafts before we had them in school and so did some of the other girls. But everybody was at least exposed to it for a few weeks.

Comes in handy in life!



@Mario:

MMario - *REAL* men knit LACE

:roflhard:

cacunn
06-08-2010, 10:45 AM
Is Russel Crowe demonstrating a new hand hold for knitting? Does not matter the fact that he has knitting in his hand and is willing to have his picture taken is amazing.

People need to be careful if you insult a man while he is knitting he has long pointy sticks in his hands and a circular needle cable makes a great garrote. Or so I have been told.

added:
I sew and repair my wife's (who does not sew) clothes. I have sewn kilts and it is a lot of fun kitting in public kilted, just to watch faces. I cook better than my wife, though she is progressing quite well. The only thing that I can think is gender specific is bearing children. I did not leave out fathering children with the possibility of cell spontaneously dividing it may be possible for a woman to have a fatherless child.

OffJumpsJack
06-08-2010, 10:56 AM
...Sexy?
Or just feminine?

From :roflhard:
to :nails:
;)
Or just feminine?
Well, there's the rub. :doh:

Knitting, crochet, needle point, and sewing are skills and are neither masculine nor feminine. In my experience, fewer men than women are able to make and accept this separation. (Although some terms suck as tailor or seamstress do indicate gender of the crafter.)

Straight men also crochet and knit. There is a group on Ravelry (http://www.ravelry.com/groups/s-m-a-c-k) by that name. My wife does think it is sexy when I knit or crochet.

When I knit in public, I get more comments of interest from women than from men. Typically, men will not comment unless they already know me. More often it is women who will make appreciative comments or ask questions about my WIP. The frequency of interest increases with age; I get more comments from women my age (40 something) or older than I do from younger women.

Knitting is a sign of a bigger, erm, brain. :thumbsup:
Yeah. That's the ticket.

MellieThePooh
06-08-2010, 04:39 PM
My husband knits. It's positively OBNOXIOUS because he's better than I am (although he doesn't have the staying power to finish a whole project). So, not sexy, annoying! But it's handy when I'm figuring out a stitch or a pattern or trying to understand this double knitting thing. His engineering man-brain is very useful for those things.

trvvn5
06-08-2010, 07:02 PM
As a guy knitter, I get this question from straight guys who don't knit.

"You know they sell those in stores now? Right?"

Mike
06-09-2010, 02:03 AM
I don't find men knitting at all feminine or sexy. :p

Is it just the knitting or is my ability to make a mean pie from scratch also sexy?
I know I find women bowhunters and archers sexy but a woman changing a tire wouldn't do a thing for me.

I sure do wish I would've known these things when I was much younger.

hyperactive
06-09-2010, 04:55 AM
and it is a lot of fun kitting in public kilted, just to watch faces.

:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

:rofl: I want a picture :roflhard:

But you don't do it for just the effect, do you? Also for the "shere self of you"? Great!

My husband became a much better cook than I am and his pie crust is amazing (and inherited from his DAD). Other dows are my teritory. And I do not cook badly, either, he is just BETTER.
I just wish he would knit, too. Then he would understand my projects better or be able to sympathise more with difficulty or size of project.
But he pays attention when I knit and feels bad when I frog big parts. Just wish I could make him start. He would LOVE it. And he was really close, lately. Just didn't quite jump on it. oh, well.

Rosegirl147
06-09-2010, 03:31 PM
That's cool they teach knitting in schools there!

They teach in America as well. I was at the park sitting on a bench knitting/watching my dauther when a 13 year old girl comes over to me and tells me she likes to knitt too. She told me she learned knitting from junior high as an elective (extra class).
______________________________
Rosegirl147 :knitting:
"All's fair in love and war." from John Lyly's 'Euphues'

blueygh2
06-09-2010, 03:49 PM
I have gotten strange faces as well, and not so nice remarks.

When I was crocheting, same, but a man on the train asked me if it was difficult and told me he could crochet as well, but only chains.

LBECK
06-09-2010, 05:28 PM
I don't know about sexy, but I think that a man that can do the things that society dubs for women is a very secure man. I don't see one thing wrong with it.

MMario
06-10-2010, 08:32 AM
Not the first time society has been wrong about something. won't be the last time, either, I'm sure.

Abbers1026
06-10-2010, 08:50 AM
in my opinion anyone can and should be able to do whatever pleases them...men knitting i think is awesome!...:happydance:

but this could just be because being a woman i get looks all the time when i walk into a hardware store and they think i don't know what i'm looking for. the best was day after thanksgiving last year i was meeting up with some girls for lunch so i was in heels and my nice coat looking very girly and i walk in ace to get a few things and as i was walking back to the section i needed a guy stopped me and asked what i was looking for (he was like 15 also) to which i replied with the list of 5 or so items i was there for and he looked slightly confused :zombie: and i said don't worry i know where it all is. men are also shocked when they find out I've completely rewired houses, I'm very comfortable with power tools, and many automotive needs.

so men who knit...more power to them...they're doing something useful with their time:cheering:

MMario
06-10-2010, 09:09 AM
'twas my mom who taught me how to wite lights and replace the plug ends on power cables. And that's with an electrician as a father!

Dobela
06-10-2010, 10:23 AM
While I certainly don't mind getting attention from women when they see me knitting, the ones who bother me are the ones who act like it's something unusual. Men knitting was *NOT* unusual at all until post world war II.

I think this is so true. My great grandpa was a fisherman and knitted his own small nets according to my grandmother. The large nets he used a shuttle to make the knots, but the smaller ones he knitted. Knitting was another skill men used to make necessities. Interestingly none of his girls learned to knit - only the boys so they could make their own nets. My grandmother did learn to crochet though.

Honestly, I don't care if it is a man or woman who knits. The more who knit, the easier it is to find supplies. OTOH, I am glad my husband doesn't knit because I don't want to share what I have stocked up LOL.

On the note of it being taught in schools, that varies so much in the US. One of the ladies in my local knitting group teaches high school and will begin a club for those interested next year. She isn't the home ec teacher though. Another person I know is teaching it thru a Boys and Girls Club in an impoverished area of town. The kids really enjoy it but keeping them in supplies is difficult since they rely on donations of yarn and needles.

ChristiBerrymomma
06-10-2010, 01:02 PM
Not the first time society has been wrong about something. won't be the last time, either, I'm sure.

I completely agree. I have a lot of kids and get rude and insensitive comments about that socially unacceptable tidbit too.

I think LBECK hit the nail on the head about it making for a very secure man. THAT is what I find so appealing. A man that is not afraid to just BE who he is and not be ashamed. That is a wonderful thing no matter where you go, no matter what age, race or gender.

I didn't mean to make you guys feel like a piece of meat, or anything... honestly I've not been here long enough to know there were guys regularly here. Sorry about that. But I'm glad you are here and look forward to getting to know you all... without anymore comments :aww:

trvvn5
06-11-2010, 11:12 AM
I think you're totally correct here. The sexiness doesn't come from the idea that the man is knitting or the idea that he's being feminine, I think it comes from the fact that he has enough self confidence and sense of self to say that he enjoys something regardless of what other people think of him or what he is doing.

I have a friend who's husband goes out with us to gay bars. He's even to the point now where he knows that we enjoy it so he makes the suggestion of going. She finds that aspect of him very sexy. His openmindedness, his security, his care for the needs/wants of her and her friends, these are all things that are important to her and his ability to accomodate those things for her is very sexy.

FaithfulMormon
06-17-2010, 09:45 AM
I don't know whether it's sexy or whatever, but I do know last night my wife looked at me and said, "You know you acted like such a guy. You bought the stuff and acted like you didn't need to read the books or anything and just gave it a go."

Needless to say, I can slip knot and cast a basic stitch, but that's it. LOL! The knitting has stumped me. So now it's backtracking and reading.

So, safe to say, another guys is infected with the knitting bug.

As I posted in my intro, I was raised that guys weren't supposed to knit or anything like that, regardless how much I asked to learn.

cacunn
06-17-2010, 10:29 AM
I don't know whether it's sexy or whatever, but I do know last night my wife looked at me and said, "You know you acted like such a guy. You bought the stuff and acted like you didn't need to read the books or anything and just gave it a go."

Needless to say, I can slip knot and cast a basic stitch, but that's it. LOL! The knitting has stumped me. So now it's backtracking and reading.

So, safe to say, another guys is infected with the knitting bug.

As I posted in my intro, I was raised that guys weren't supposed to knit or anything like that, regardless how much I asked to learn.

Check out the free videos at KnittingHelp that are on the menu bar. Also check out the videos on YouTube. There are a lot of video available for the visual learner.

check out your public library for books on knitting, before you buy.

As a guy who knits - welcome to the dark side.

FaithfulMormon
06-17-2010, 10:32 AM
Thanks cacunn!

The book I bought were cheap so I got them, will go to the library and look online before buying anymore. The videos on KH are awesome. Being hard-of-hearing though I have to be more visual with those videos since there are no captions or transcripts and can't understand what is being said.

Now . . . dark side?! Nobody warned me of that!:roflhard:

cacunn
06-17-2010, 10:57 AM
Now . . . dark side?! Nobody warned me of that!:roflhard:

Yes you start out wit just a little acrylic yarn and a size 7 needle, then it is maybe I'll try a wool blend and double points. Gee that is a really nice hand dyed sports weight I need to try and how about circular needle, And it just keeps getting harder and harder to keep away from the LYS. You just have to have your fiber fix. If not the LYS then you are on line, Knit Pick needle or should I get Addi's maybe both. You call the local contractor you need a room added for your yarn stash or should i have another one added for the spinning wheel and loom. And it is always "I'll be there in a minute - I just have to finish this row. "


Welcome to the great fiber addiction. :woohoo: :roflhard: :guyknitting: :guyknitting: :guyknitting:

MMario
06-17-2010, 11:19 AM
Don't forget the seedy hours spent surfing the web spotting pictures of qiviut and vicuna yarns, or a new colourway of Kiogu.....

OffJumpsJack
06-17-2010, 11:36 AM
It was simply a silent film of a hand reaching into a bag full of different yarn balls in many colors and kinds of yarn.

I must admit, I did sit and watch that video all the way to the finish.
:roflhard:

cacunn
06-17-2010, 11:56 AM
Then there are the times that you have to clean yarn barf off of your shoes, Oh the humiliation we go through for this addiction.

MMario
06-17-2010, 12:22 PM
I shudder to admit I once fell so low that I actually was begging used needles from my friends because I couldn't afford a new one.

Normally I would have just waited, but I had this new skein of lace-weight and this really great pattern and , well, you know how it is when you have to cast on... ... ...

FaithfulMormon
06-17-2010, 01:11 PM
I shudder to admit I once fell so low that I actually was begging used needles from my friends because I couldn't afford a new one.

Normally I would have just waited, but I had this new skein of lace-weight and this really great pattern and , well, you know how it is when you have to cast on... ... ...

Now this . . . was hilarious! :roflhard:

Not laughing at your addiction, I promise. :teehee:

Okay, seriously though . . . Yarn porn?! OffJumpsJack, you are crazy! Wonder who came up with that idea.

ArtLady1981
06-18-2010, 11:36 PM
I hope my husband never tries to knit! It would mean the world is about to end!

He cuts down trees and builds log houses.
I knit.
He hunts and fishes.
I cook.

We've got a good thing goin'!

Each to his own!

I love our guy knitters here at KH! But I love my sister knitters just as much! :hug:

Mike
06-19-2010, 09:01 AM
I build stuff.
I knit.
I hunt and fish.
I cook.

I'm my own couple. :)

ArtLady1981
06-19-2010, 02:08 PM
I build stuff.
I knit.
I hunt and fish.
I cook.

I'm my own couple. :)

Mike, you're priceless! :teehee:

OffJumpsJack
06-20-2010, 12:02 AM
I build stuff.
I knit.
I hunt and fish.
I cook.

I'm my own couple. :)
:roflhard:
Sorry but I have to say, "Nope."

You are not your own couple, until you argue with yourself.

cacunn
06-20-2010, 03:04 PM
:roflhard:
Sorry but I have to say, "Nope."

You are not your own couple, until you argue with yourself.

I used to argue with myself, but then I realized I was talking to an idiot. :tap:

Jeremy
06-21-2010, 10:07 AM
Thats like the old Jewish guy who becomes a castaway on a desert island. Bored, he builds a whole town just for himself-a hotel, a bar, a clothing store, a restaurant. When he is finally rescued he takes his rescuers for a tour of the town. They stood in wonder at what he had accomplished. This is great, one said, but I notice you built two synagogues why is that?
Oh, the Jewish guy says, the first one is the one I go to, the second is the one I wouldn't be caught dead in.

mspwrz
06-30-2010, 09:28 AM
I think this is so true. My great grandpa was a fisherman and knitted his own small nets according to my grandmother. The large nets he used a shuttle to make the knots, but the smaller ones he knitted. Knitting was another skill men used to make necessities. Interestingly none of his girls learned to knit - only the boys so they could make their own nets. My grandmother did learn to crochet though.

Honestly, I don't care if it is a man or woman who knits. The more who knit, the easier it is to find supplies. OTOH, I am glad my husband doesn't knit because I don't want to share what I have stocked up LOL.

On the note of it being taught in schools, that varies so much in the US. One of the ladies in my local knitting group teaches high school and will begin a club for those interested next year. She isn't the home ec teacher though. Another person I know is teaching it thru a Boys and Girls Club in an impoverished area of town. The kids really enjoy it but keeping them in supplies is difficult since they rely on donations of yarn and needles.

I am the home ec teacher who plans to start an after-school knitting and crocheting club this year. I taught a few students to knit this year and loved it. I applied for a set of supplies from the craft yarn council but they ran out before they got to me so.... I started teaching kids to make their own needles using good quality, smooth oak dowels. My theory is that kids are more likely to stick with it if they invest the time in making their own first pair of needles.
In addition, I ask that their first project be a Warm Up America section. I buy yarn at garage sales and off clearance racks to start students out on. If they get hooked they usually want to get their own anyway. Their options for yarn do not include a LYS so we have to rely on Wal-mart, Hobby Lobby and Michaels. LYS pricing would be beyond most of their price range anyway. It is often beyond mine as well.I have only be knitting about a year and a half so my skills are not that advanced but I know enough to spread the joy and relaxation benefiets to others.

jess_hawk
06-30-2010, 01:41 PM
When I was four, my mom taught me to embroider. A year later, my brother wanted to learn (he's two years younger than me). He enjoyed a wilder color scheme than I did (we still have the set of pillow cases with rainbow-colored sheep) but in general, we were both talented at sewing until approximately high school, when he suddenly became too macho to sew.
Now, I've surpassed my mom's skills, but my brother wouldn't be caught dead doing anything more complex than patching a pair of jeans or sewing a button back on a shirt.

Rhonda - I love the idea of having your students make their own needles! Keep in mind, though, as you teach them to knit, that wooden needles work best for people who knit reasonably loosely. I love how they feel, but I have an extremely difficult time knitting on them. So if you notice some tight knitters who are struggling, do them a favor and switch them onto metal or plastic needles!

cacunn
06-30-2010, 01:42 PM
Have you talked to the managers of Hobby Lobby and Michaels about donations to the school? They may give a discount or if the school has a tax number you could avoid this cost.

You might also check with the LYS and local knitting groups. The Chambersburg (PA) S&B has a yarn swap every so often. At the last there was yarn unswapped at the end of the night and we donated it to one of our members school for their knitting group.

Also contact some of the yarn manufacturer, they may have a donation program or end of run yarn or discontinued yarns for donation.

Ask and it maybe be given, don't ask and nobody knows of the need.

jjlrdomom
06-30-2010, 02:50 PM
Heh! some of these comments have made me laugh out loud! Too funny!
But I can't even cast a vote for sexy, feminine, or whatever, because I've never actually seen a guy knit! And in my house, I'm still trying to fight the stereotype that only old grannies knit and crochet! My husband has slowly come to accept that you can be young and do these things (not that I'm way young, but 43, middle of the road). So, guys, you wanna come over and knit? That would REALLY blow my poor hubby's mind!!! Heh heh!
:zombie:

mspwrz
06-30-2010, 03:33 PM
In some historical circles, it is believed the guys were the original knitters borne out of the need to make certain things like fishing nets and the like. History can certainly document times when men knit openly. Our society has villified men doing anything creative.

I always remind my students when we learn basic sewing and repair skills in class that many of the best and highest paid designers are male. I teach clothing repair skills by having the students make a monkey out of a pair of crew socks. It teaches them the skills needed to make basic clothing repairs ( buttons, whip stich, back stitch and running stitch). Many of the best and cuteset monkeys are done by guys to give to their girlfriends or mothers!

Do what makes you happy guys and enjoy it to the fullest!

mspwrz
06-30-2010, 03:38 PM
When I was four, my mom taught me to embroider. A year later, my brother wanted to learn (he's two years younger than me). He enjoyed a wilder color scheme than I did (we still have the set of pillow cases with rainbow-colored sheep) but in general, we were both talented at sewing until approximately high school, when he suddenly became too macho to sew.
Now, I've surpassed my mom's skills, but my brother wouldn't be caught dead doing anything more complex than patching a pair of jeans or sewing a button back on a shirt.

Rhonda - I love the idea of having your students make their own needles! Keep in mind, though, as you teach them to knit, that wooden needles work best for people who knit reasonably loosely. I love how they feel, but I have an extremely difficult time knitting on them. So if you notice some tight knitters who are struggling, do them a favor and switch them onto metal or plastic needles!

Thank you for the input. I will keep that in mind for the future. When I was learning, my biggest frustration was dropped stitches which happened a lot on the slicker needles but, ... as you point out some knit very tightly and the wood( even when waxed) has more grip. I will look for that in the future. Thanks!

jjlrdomom
06-30-2010, 03:40 PM
I have taught my boys and my girl to knit. My oldest boy and my girl can knit and purl, all 3 of my kid can finger-knit and loom knit. My youngest son is 7, so he doesn't quite have the agility for knitting needles yet, but he's eager to learn as he LOVES dressing up his stuffed animals (mostly dogs). They all have nice, finger-knit leashes! Heh!
Amy

knitbrit10
06-30-2010, 10:30 PM
RIGHT ON! Men who knit,crochet awesome! Haven't seen any around here sadly. In southern California maybe they are too busy sunning,lol. My friend in England can make pies and such.He doesn't know how to knit...all those yrs in the military taught him nothing then,lmao.

snelly
07-01-2010, 03:09 PM
I like to see and talk to guys that knit, but I feel the same way about women that knit as well. I'm just happy to be able to share stories and information with anyone who can understand what I'm talking about.I don't consider knitting, crocheting, weaving, spinning, or sewing to be female tasks/ hobbies.:X: I have to admit that I do make assumptions about people who do fiber arts as a hobby. I assume that they are practical people. I guess that is an attractive quality in any person. :)

faelyn
07-02-2010, 12:34 PM
I see nothing wrong with men knitting. I have personally never met one that knits, but I do know of a few that do..just not personally.. I think it's cool. Any proof of a guy having creativity is positive in my book.

MMario
07-02-2010, 01:47 PM
wow. I really, really, REALLY hope you did not mean that the way is looks...

OffJumpsJack
07-02-2010, 04:34 PM
to Mmario,

What did it look like to you? ;)

Perhaps male plumbers, carpenters, electricians, doctors, and engineers aren't creative? Certainly the males who program computers or who are NASA rocket scientist aren't creative types. :oo:

No, I don't think she meant that men are not creative in any other pursuits that are (or were) typically dominated by men.

The New Renaissance: Just because a gender is (currently) under represented in a field doesn't mean that gender is less able to participate or even excel in that field.

Right ladies and gentlemen? ;)

MMario
07-06-2010, 08:46 AM
Well yes, I'm sorry, it did (and still does) look to me like she was implying men have no creativity.