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douloskyriou
09-14-2010, 11:54 PM
Okay, newbie question number two!

When I cast on one, I end up with two loops. So, if it says cast on, say, 10, then should I actually cast on 10 times, ending up with 11 loops, or just cast on 9 to have 10 loops?

Jan in CA
09-15-2010, 12:57 AM
If you're using the long tail cast on it does cast on two with the first one. Count them both of them as stitches.

douloskyriou
09-15-2010, 01:12 AM
I am, and thank you. So if it says cast on 87, then before I start knitting, on the needle I cast on to, I should have just 87 loops. Thank you!

hyperactive
09-15-2010, 03:21 AM
which ever method you use: a cast on is meant to produce stitches for you. What matters is the amount of stitches you end up with. So if it says cast on 10 stitches, then you need to end with 10 loops over your needle.

And: long tail can produce 2 stitches with the first "motion" - in my way of doing long tail it doesn't and I am more happy with my first cast on stitch than when I do the "start mid air" version. But that is personal taste :)

suzeeq
09-15-2010, 08:15 AM
The CO includes the first loop so it should be counted. I don't count as I go along, but CO a bunch of them, then count.

knitcindy
09-16-2010, 06:30 PM
I always cast on enough stitches so that the TOTAL equals whatever # the pattern says to start with.

For instance.....if the pattern says "Cast on 57 stitches" Then I cast on enough so that the TOTAL number of stitches on the needle is 57.

HTH, knitcindy

melmac51
09-23-2010, 11:24 PM
I always cast on enough stitches so that the TOTAL equals whatever # the pattern says to start with.

For instance.....if the pattern says "Cast on 57 stitches" Then I cast on enough so that the TOTAL number of stitches on the needle is 57.

HTH, knitcindy

That's exactly what I've always done, but after reading the question, I started to wonder...:??

AngelaR
09-24-2010, 08:24 AM
I'm constantly counting my loops... I use stitch markers to a ridculous degree until I am comfortable with a pattern or using one that is constantly changing. There is a cast on technique where you will cast on two loops on the first cast, you count them as two separate stitches.