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TangoLima
10-10-2010, 03:54 PM
I took a knitting class 2 weeks ago, and have been practicing as often as I can since. I have really worked on my knits and purls and trying to become more consistent.

I finally decided I had practiced enough to actually try and make something. So, I found a simple pattern for a scarf that uses only knit and purls.

Well, I've been working hard on it, and have really been trying to pay attention to what I'm doing. But, I have had to pull out the whole thing twice already. Once, I was on the 4th row and found out I had one extra stitch. I think I made a mistake when I originally CO, so I pulled the whole thing out. Then, I very carefully counted the stitches each time I finished a row, and I did well until the 6th row, and somehow I ended up with 2 extra stitches at the end. I have absolutely no idea how I did it! I was being so careful! So, I tried to pull out the row, but I couldn't get it back onto the needle, so I pulled the whole thing out again.

I'm just so frustrated right now! How will I ever be able to make anything if I keep having to pull it out? What am I doing wrong?

When I took the knitting class, the instructed said knitting is "fun and relaxing". But, so far, this is neither fun nor relaxing! Help!

newamy
10-10-2010, 04:07 PM
Usually extra stitches come about when you don't have the working yarn properly positioned at the start of the row, if it is wrapped over the top of the needle it looks like a stitch you are supposed to knit.

There is quite a discussion about it here: http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=32886

This is from the How To section of the forum.

Don't worry, press on and keep trying and one day it will all click and you will then be able to relax! However some knitting is not relaxing in my opinion. If I have to stay alert and think about the stitch pattern that doesn't relax me, but if I can knit big sections without thinking that does. So it will depend on what you are working on as to how relaxing it is.

CountryNaturals
10-10-2010, 04:15 PM
My advice is to start again with an easier pattern. K2, P1 is a stitch pattern I found here and I love it for a scarf. It has a rich texture that makes it look complicated, but it's not.

Seed stitch also works well. Cast on an odd number of stitches and just K1, P1, K1 etc.

Both of these patterns are reversible, so they're perfect for scarves, and neither of them require any counting of stitches or rows. They'll help you identify knit and purl stitches so when you work on a more complicated project you'll be able to see how they're supposed to look.

Best of luck. :hug:

Breezed
10-10-2010, 04:45 PM
Don't give up!! I am a beginner as well and it does get frustrating sometimes. I found practice knitting wasn't satisfying and I wasn't liking it at all. Then I realized, I NEED an end goal. Self-gratification, whether there was going to be mistakes or not. So, I found a few beginner/easy patterns free and started over. I have now completed 2 small projects, almost a third and also currently working on my first sock. They each have imperfections (extra stitches, missing stitches, holes) but you know what? I don't care. I MADE SOMETHING!

Oh and make sure you use the free videos section a lot, pause as you practice, it is so helpful. Also, everyone on this forum is so full of encouragement, tips, tricks, etc. so keep coming back when you need that little push forward.

kmaclean
10-10-2010, 05:55 PM
It can be frustrating! But rest assured that we have all been there too ... you're certainly not the only one!

You've gotten some good tips from the other posters ... just keep trying, and don't stress too much over each small mistake. I doubt I've completed anything that was completely error free! It can also be helpful to check out the videos here on KH that focus on fixing mistakes ... that way, when you do notice an error you can fix it without ripping out your entire project. I find it especially helpful to know how to TINK (or, "unknit") ... it's good that you're pausing to count your stitches at the end of each row, so if you notice you have an extra stitch or two when you get to the end of the row knowing how to unknit just that last row so that you can continue will be much less frustrating than ripping out and starting over! :thumbsup:

RuthieinMaryland
10-10-2010, 08:21 PM
Hi! :waving:

First, in the section of the forum titled "How To Questions" there's a wonderful sticky at the very top all about how to avoid those pesky extra stitches! Check it out, I'm sure it will be very helpful!

It sounds like you've got a good grip on the knits and purls. However, when you make that turn of your work when starting a new row, it's so easy to create an extra stitch!

Work to the end of a row and then turn the work. Grab hold of the working yarn and pull it toward you, up and over the needle. You'll see what appears to be two stitches. This is the back end of the first stitch which has gotten pulled to the front and you're seeing both "legs". It's very easy to just go on and knit that which will make you an extra stitch.

If you pull that working yarn towards the back then you've got a nice clean start that won't make extra stitches. Take it as a knitting law that if you're coming up with extra stitches it's most likely because you're wrapping or twisting or pulling the working yarn in such a way that it makes an extra stitch. There's nothing wrong with your knits and purls! Just watch how you handle the working yarn! :)

One day it will all click into place and you'll be ready to tackle the world!!!!! :yay:
Keep us informed about how you're doing!

Happy knitting,

Ruthie :clink:

AngelaR
10-11-2010, 08:19 AM
Trust me hon, there isn't one among us that hasn't done this. I'll admit, there are times when I find I've either picked up or dropped a stitch and I've been knitting for over 20 years. I can only repeat what the others have already said, keep practicing. I spent years just doing baby blankets and very "square" things, never really understanding what I was doing, until I wanted to learn socks, and I found this place. I honestly have learned more here in the year or so since I found this forum, than I had in all the years previously combined.

Read the "How To" section here or "Pattern Help" when you have a question. The folks here have a wealth of knowledge that we are lucky they share with us.

WandaT
10-11-2010, 08:22 AM
Yup, I'm with you. I think I "practiced" for a year before it really clicked with me - learning to read my stitches and feeling comfortable. I made a lot of garter stitch scarves and dishcloths. That was almost five years ago and the rest, as they say, is history. Some get it quicker than others - for me it took a lot more practicing than some ... and btw, I still rip out quite frequently. :)

TangoLima
10-11-2010, 11:48 AM
Thank you all for your tips and kind words of encouragement!

Now, 2 days later, things are going a lot better. I have finished 42 rows and haven't had too many problems. It hasn't been error free, but I guess I'm getting better at catching my mistakes before I get too far along, and better at "undoing" a stitch or two.

Thanks to you all and this site, I am starting to see the light at the end of the tunnel and getting excited about all the future possibilities.

:muah:

GrandmaLori
10-11-2010, 01:59 PM
I recommend when you make a mistake, try not to rip it all back, but just ,un-knit it stitch by stitch until you come to the mistake. I always take time to look things over quite often, to catch mistakes. I know there is information about undoing knitting stitch by stitch.

kmaclean
10-11-2010, 09:37 PM
Glad to hear that things are starting to go a little better for you! It will continue to get easier as you keep practicing and you'll be feeling much more confident before you know it. :thumbsup:

Keep up the good work, and feel free to ask for help as you go if something isn't making sense to you ... sometimes one little question can save you hours of frustration trying to figure something out on your own!

Happy knitting! :knitting:

N0obKnitter
10-13-2010, 04:24 PM
I took a knitting class 2 weeks ago, and have been practicing as often as I can since. I have really worked on my knits and purls and trying to become more consistent.

I finally decided I had practiced enough to actually try and make something. So, I found a simple pattern for a scarf that uses only knit and purls.

Well, I've been working hard on it, and have really been trying to pay attention to what I'm doing. But, I have had to pull out the whole thing twice already. Once, I was on the 4th row and found out I had one extra stitch. I think I made a mistake when I originally CO, so I pulled the whole thing out. Then, I very carefully counted the stitches each time I finished a row, and I did well until the 6th row, and somehow I ended up with 2 extra stitches at the end. I have absolutely no idea how I did it! I was being so careful! So, I tried to pull out the row, but I couldn't get it back onto the needle, so I pulled the whole thing out again.

I'm just so frustrated right now! How will I ever be able to make anything if I keep having to pull it out? What am I doing wrong?

When I took the knitting class, the instructed said knitting is "fun and relaxing". But, so far, this is neither fun nor relaxing! Help!

When I first started, I only used garter stitch. If you find it too difficult to use more complex stitches, why not try Garter stitch until you feel more comfortable?

ArtLady1981
10-13-2010, 07:10 PM
I've knit for years, and I can admit I still have challenges with correct stitch counts on some projects, like lacework scarves for example.

Here's what I told a new knitter at our recent South Sound Knitter's Guild meetup:

"Think of knitting like taking a bunch of kindergarteners on a field trip! Everytime you get off the bus, and get back on...you need to do a 'head count'!"

And knitting can be just like that! At the end of EACH row...I do a "head count"...to make sure I haven't lost any children, I mean 'stitches'! :teehee:

The use of stitch markers between repeats...or in your case maybe between every 5 stitches...makes the 'head count' quicker to count up!

You don't want to lose any kids, and you don't want to pick up anyone new, either!