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View Full Version : Help! Large Gloves!


PHOENIXMOON
11-07-2010, 09:48 PM
Hey all,
I have tried to knit fingerless gloves. However, I have large hands. I have tried the largest size for the pattern, used a size of knitting needle bigger than recommended and worked it quite loosely. Even doing this is not big enough. I would like your help to work out how I can increase the size of gloves. I feel like a bit of a let down to this community to be a knitter and unable to make gloves that I can wear. I feel a bit of a fraud going into the shops and buying knitted gloves (that are too tight!).
I await your recommendations with great anticipation.
Many thanks
~*Phoenix*~

Jan in CA
11-08-2010, 01:32 AM
Here's a fingerless mittens recipes where you measure and do it by gauge. That seems like the best way to do it.
http://web.archive.org/web/20080116010836/http://knitandplenty.typepad.com/photos/free_patterns/fast_fingerless.html
http://www.knitting-and.com/knitting/patterns/mittens/mitts-to-fit.html

hyperactive
11-08-2010, 04:31 AM
Hi!
If you do not find help in those great pattern-links, Jan posted...

My first question is: are you making gloves for a men's hand or a woman's? Sorry, your nick name does not tell what you are.

There are patterns for lots of different sizes. And the ones existing can be adjusted. Your idea about the needle size was the best advice out there already for an easy change of your pattern. So if it shall remain that pattern then easy unfortunately will not help. So we may have to dive deeper into that pattern or the like.
Is this a fingerless glove that does not have little fingerholes at all or does it have those beginnings of finger holes? Does it have a thumb hole? (that would give us a first idea of how much effort the changes will be)

So: Is there a link to the pattern you were using? And what is the size of your hand?

With that info we can help out.
But if Jan's links make you happy, you are good to go anyways.

Jan in CA
11-08-2010, 01:26 PM
Good point, Hyper. I don't know if you're male or female either, but if you're a woman there's no reason you can't make a "mens" pattern. A fingerless mitten/glove is the same either way. :thumbsup:

hyperactive
11-08-2010, 01:48 PM
I just thought, I would ask. We are all assuming a little fast, that people are female - but we have so many passionate knitting guys here, that I would feel foolish showing only girl patterns if a guy asks.

By the way: here is a men's glove that you can just work with short fingers:

Garnstudio.com (http://garnstudio.com/lang/en/visoppskrift.php?d_nr=85&d_id=20&lang=us)

PHOENIXMOON
11-12-2010, 10:04 AM
Hey all,
I am a female. But I knitted a male fingerless glove pattern simply because the sizing is bigger! The 'fingerless' part does go up the individual fingers about two thirds of the way up to the first joint from the knuckle (this also includes the thumb). The fingers are fine. It is the size of the palm that is too small, and the ribbing begins about the middle of my palm!
Many thanks for your replies.
~*Phoenix*~

hyperactive
11-12-2010, 11:00 AM
Hi!
I would adjust the pattern as follows:

cast on more stitches than before. (how many stitches do you need, to make the palm comfortable? just estimate). For your ribbing you either do k2 p2 or k1 p1 I assume? You need the right amount of stitches (either a multiple of 4 for k2 p2 or a multiple of two for k1 p1 to make it look good and work out well.)

So you estimate the number of extra stitches that you need and work the whole thing around until you like the length of the ribbing.
Then you work in plain stochinette stitch (when working in the round: knit all stitches). Work for as long as you like (the stochinette may well go to your wrist or even up the arm some, whatever your desire is). Then start with the thumb gusset (the extra stitches you make for the thumb. Or if the thumb is just made by resting a few stitches for later use and has no gusset then work until the stochinette stitch has reached that part.

In estimating where I am I usually just try the thing on every now and then. Adjust it comfortably on your hand. Then you see when you get to the spot to put the thumb to.

Then I add a round or 2, sometimes 3 or 4 (depending on the thickness of the yarn) for good measure. Because estimates like this often fall short of reality by a bit.

Then work the rest of the palm until you find - by trying on - that you have reached the splitting point for the fingerholes.

Now you have more stitches than before and need to worry about that for the fingers.

Try to distribute the extra stitches to the fingerholes as you like (evenly if possible). Easiest if you made 8 stitches more than in the first attempt, because then every side of every finger just gets a stitch more. But you can also make it when adding 6 or 10 or just 2 stitches.

If you want to work the fingerholes the exact size they are now, there always is the option to reduce the number of stitches before you get to the finger-part. about 2 rounds prior to starting the fingers, you can evenly decrease as many stitches as you added to the pattern before. (just k2tog as many times as you added stitches - but space that out about evenly around the hand)

Then you can work the fingers as done before.

Have fun.

By the way, the most crucial part of the length is the space between the thumbhole and the fingers: you do not want that too tight or with extra bulk in between. So try on and maybe even test again after finger no. 1 is done (maybe before cutting the yarn) because you can always go back and unravel a round or add a round - or two or any number.

Mirl56
11-12-2010, 11:02 AM
http://knitty.com/ISSUEsummer05/PATTcigar.html
Here's a man's mostly fingerless gloves - just stop the other fingers where you want.

PHOENIXMOON
11-14-2010, 10:49 AM
Hey all,
Thankyou for your input everyone!
Mirl -I can find patterns that are for men, its just the measurements are too small. I think I need 5 inches (as minimum) across the palm. (BTW the three fingerless glove aka cigar gloves is an awesome idea!)

Hyperactive -That is a very brilliant, and (for me) a very scary idea to edit a pattern that works well. But when I have summoned up the courage, I think I will use the amazing invention of a 'lifeline' when I have found the measurement that I like.

Many thanks everyone!
~*Phoenix*~