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View Full Version : Martha Stewart and Vanna White


PinkRoses
01-16-2012, 02:08 PM
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suzeeq
01-16-2012, 02:12 PM
Vanna crochets and has for years. Yarn isn't just for knitting.... Deborah Norville knits too and has her own line if you'd prefer that.

Jan in CA
01-16-2012, 02:23 PM
I believe Martha Stewart knits.

suzeeq
01-16-2012, 02:25 PM
Crocheting is getting to be a big thing too, it's not just old grannies making baby blankets, there's a lot of creativity in the crochet world today. And both yarn sites provide lots of knitting patterns.

suzeeq
01-16-2012, 02:53 PM
She is a big promoter of crafts and most of her new yarn line is really oriented toward using them in craft pieces rather than actually knitting a project. As long as these celebrities can help promote knitting and crochet though, that's great, brings awareness to more people.

RochesterKnitter
01-16-2012, 03:29 PM
"I have been knitting all my life and am very happy to be introducing a line of beautiful, high-quality yarns to create the most fabulous projects," says Stewart.

This quote came from this website.
http://www.yarnsupply.com/martha-stewart-yarn.html?gclid=CMWS2vii1a0CFUOo4Aodvh-pmA

Who knows if it is the truth, or just marketing.

DogCatMom
01-16-2012, 04:11 PM
Oh, I know Vanna crochets. I hope I don't sound bitchy, I would just think that since knitting is such a big thing these days, why not learn? It's not that difficult. If I had a yarn production in my name, I would make it a point to try all the crafts. I'm surprised that Martha Stewart doesn't know how to do knitting or crochet. ???

First, as a long-time crocheter, long-time wanted-to-be-knitter, and short-time knitter, I'd like to ask that you read this thread (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=105131). My posts, particularly, discuss some reasons WHY people cannot/do not learn to knit.

Second, crochet received a LOT of publicity from Martha Stewart when she emerged from prison wearing a poncho she had crocheted herself while serving her sentence. I think that shows that she DOES crochet.

Whether or not everyone values crochet is up to them, but it's a valid method of self-expression. Crocheters are *fed up to here* with disrespect from some knitters, and it never seems to stop.

No bashing, please.

DCM

cheley
01-16-2012, 05:56 PM
First, as a long-time crocheter, long-time wanted-to-be-knitter, and short-time knitter, I'd like to ask that you read this thread (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=105131). My posts, particularly, discuss some reasons WHY people cannot/do not learn to knit.

Second, crochet received a LOT of publicity from Martha Stewart when she emerged from prison wearing a poncho she had crocheted herself while serving her sentence. I think that shows that she DOES crochet.

Whether or not everyone values crochet is up to them, but it's a valid method of self-expression. Crocheters are *fed up to here* with disrespect from some knitters, and it never seems to stop.

I started needlework as a "crocheter"..then ventured onto knitting...I enjoy the "finished" look of knit.but I also know(and appreciate) the time spent crocheting and I still do some pcs in crochet...I think it's just a matter of how much time,patience, and preferrence, and it's a "good thing" to know both crafts! I am not feeling the "bashing" thing here, I wasn't aware the there is such a thing between crafters:aww: BTW..Lily Chin, Vicki Howell and Debbie Stoller all have there own lines of Yarn:woohoo:

Antares
01-16-2012, 06:14 PM
Second, crochet received a LOT of publicity from Martha Stewart when she emerged from prison wearing a poncho she had crocheted herself while serving her sentence. I think that shows that she DOES crochet.DCM

Actually, another inmate crocheted the poncho for Stewart, so she didn't actually crochet it herself: http://www.wptz.com/money/4286397/detail.html

At any rate, what difference does it make whether these people learn to knit or crochet? They use the yarn in different arts and crafts, which by the way, does not have to be either knit or crochet!!

And, yes, Vanna has been crocheting for years and years!!!

Guess I don't understand the complaint here. It's their business and their yarn, so let them do as they please with it and learn what they want to learn!!!

Remember about there not being any knitting police? Well, there's not any yarn police or crochet police either. So how about we live and let live, eh?

suzeeq
01-16-2012, 06:15 PM
Actually, Martha didn't make that poncho herself; a former inmate who'd served time with her and had been released did it and gave it to her as a 'going home' present.

JudyD
01-16-2012, 06:17 PM
[quote=Second, crochet received a LOT of publicity from Martha Stewart when she emerged from prison wearing a poncho she had crocheted herself while serving her sentence. I think that shows that she DOES crochet. DCM[/quote]

Martha didn't make the poncho...here's a quote when she was released from prison...

Stewart told her employees that the poncho was made by an unidentified fellow inmate who crochets about 12 hours a day using yarn from the prison commissary. "I hope she is reading the news and looking at television, because I'm so proud of her."

Judy

carterm4
01-16-2012, 06:19 PM
doesn't Debbie Macomber have her own line of yarn and knit. I know she isn't a celebrity per say but a famous author

TEMA
01-16-2012, 06:27 PM
I've crocheted for years and knit for years. I love crochet for different reasons than I love knitting.
First of all... I love crochet because one stitch? It's easy to unravel and you never lose your place... in knitting I prefer to unknit (or tink) to ravelling... I can never find the place where I want to be after that.
Second... I find that crochet makes a lovely fabric...depending on what you want... from fragile lace to sturdy jackets...
Lace is a non-event for me in Knitting.
I love knitting because I feel so darned smart doing it and it is quite relaxing and worth doing. These days I do plain knitting because I'm under a great deal of stress and need something not too difficult if I'm going to do it right.
I love to knit and crochet on the same piece. I see a lot of knitting patterns call for crochet edging instead of doing a rib... I think that looks beautiful and it's so simple.
Crochet is so easy to teach... at least, initially. You only have one needle to keep track of and most kids seem to think they will be able to do it...
In any case, what does it matter? It's all about the yarn, wool, whatever you are using... the fact that your mind, hands and brain are engaged in an activity that finishes up with something beautiful and useful at the same time and does wonderful things for your ego... well, that's priceless! :)
TEMA :thumbsup:

DogCatMom
01-16-2012, 08:15 PM
I've crocheted for years and knit for years. ....
In any case, what does it matter? It's all about the yarn, wool, whatever you are using... the fact that your mind, hands and brain are engaged in an activity that finishes up with something beautiful and useful at the same time and does wonderful things for your ego... well, that's priceless! :)
TEMA :thumbsup:

Exactly, TEMA, and thank you. It just gets VERY OLD, time and time again, to hear some "knitters" bash crochet (i.e., "why can't they just learn to knit?") and it needs to be stopped whenever it rears its ugly head.

Thank you again.

DCM

P.S. thx for the clarification about Martha Stewart's poncho, everyone! but the profile-raising was priceless. :)

lenaznap
01-16-2012, 08:59 PM
I'm surprised no one has mentioned the quality of yarn qua yarn. The texture, hand, color, durability, etc.

Go to any big box craft store and look at the yarns available from huge yarn manufacturers, some great stuff, some extremely ugly color combinations and strange textures I would never want to live with for the duration of any project, let alone live with the finished item.

There must be a market for all this yarn I hate or it wouldn't take up so much shelf space. I know some of my favorite colors must not be universally popular too -- surely all of us has exercised willpower and declined an impulse purchase of a beautiful yarn only to think of it months later to find it has been discontinued.

So I don't really care if yarnmakers knit if they can contribute to the variety of colors and materials that are available to me as a knitter and crocheter.

How far back in the design process would you demand knitting skill? I demand only that pattern designers know how to do the craft they are designing for. I don't care if Martha Stewart knits or crochets any more than I care if the dyer or spinner or sheep farmer or the sheep know how to knit.

suzeeq
01-16-2012, 09:12 PM
Yes, there's a big market for those lesser yarns, and some of us prefer them for other qualities.

debminerva
01-16-2012, 09:54 PM
What does it matter if the celebrity "endorsing" the yarn is crafter or knitter or crocheter? Yarn is unique to the individual purchasing it....the color, the texture, the smell (yes, I *smell* the yarn before purchasing...I'm odd). What matters is how it makes *me* feel.

I'm definitely one that buys the "inferior" yarns because they are the only thing I can afford and I :heart: knitting. It is the only thing that has been effective in lowering my stress level.

I took a "crochet-for-knitters" class at my local LYS last year. There are so many aspects of crochet I like but I haven't been able to complete a project yet.

I respect all crafters, knitters and crocheters alike, and I'm glad to be part of a hobby that can create such beautiful items and provide an amazing life skill.

DogCatMom
01-16-2012, 10:08 PM
... I hope I don't sound bitchy, I would just think that since knitting is such a big thing these days, why not learn? It's not that difficult. ... ???

I don't think this question/topic translated well on the computer. It wasn't a bash towards anyone who crochets, *I* crochet and knit. ... In no post did I bash people that crochets. I'm actually working on a crochet afghan.

(No additional text here; what could I add?)

DCM

PinkRoses
01-16-2012, 10:35 PM
(No additional text here; what could I add?)

DCM

Exactly where am I bashing people that crochet? Again, I crochet.

Jan in CA
01-16-2012, 10:53 PM
I don't think you bashed anyone, Pink Roses. Crochet can be a sensitive issue. I prefer knitting, but I started as a crocheter. It's all personal choice and the love of fiber arts. :hug:

lenaznap
01-16-2012, 11:36 PM
... I hope I don't sound bitchy, I would just think that since knitting is such a big thing these days, why not learn? It's not that difficult. ... ???

Many of us are multitaskers. Perhaps crafters in particular are good at it, I don't know (cf. the recent thread about attempting to knit and read simultaneously).

Whatever one's opinion is about Martha Stewart (personally I think it would be exhausting to spend 5 minutes with her), I think it is adequately established that she is super busy (tv, radio, magazines, books, DVDs, home products, craft products ...). I doubt I could do a third of what she does in a month and also eat and sleep let alone take time to learn a new skill like knitting, difficult or not.

You don't have to be Martha Stewart to be too busy to learn a new craft. Thinking back to when I was working full time & in school part time enjoying a few hours of an already practiced craft on a weekend could be very relaxing, meditative even, but attempting to learn something new might have pushed me over the edge :wink:

Everyone has a different situation, different demands on their time, and as someone has already mentioned, different limits to their manual dexterity -- it seems very odd to me to criticize anyone, especially anyone who directly or indirectly furthers my enjoying something I love to do, for choosing to do something other than what I do with my spare time.

suzeeq
01-16-2012, 11:46 PM
Exactly where am I bashing people that crochet? Again, I crochet.

I think your choice of words in the original post seemed to imply that only knitting mattered, so maybe it's just semantics. Maybe you were just unaware of the crafts some of these celebrities do work with.

lenaznap
01-16-2012, 11:49 PM
Yes, there's a big market for those lesser yarns, and some of us prefer them for other qualities.

I didn't mean that as a criticism of acrylic, probably 90% of what I use is acrylic. I am particularly sensitive to color though and it seems that when I browse through the yarn aisles of craft stores I see yarn that meets my budget, feels nice, but are either strange colors or color combinations, or else in very limited palette (I admit that several times I have decided *not* to knit or crochet something for a baby because all I could find in baby yarn weight was saccharine pastels and no kid-friendly bright colors at all).

Jan in CA
01-17-2012, 01:31 AM
I didn't mean that as a criticism of acrylic, probably 90% of what I use is acrylic. I am particularly sensitive to color though and it seems that when I browse through the yarn aisles of craft stores I see yarn that meets my budget, feels nice, but are either strange colors or color combinations, or else in very limited palette (I admit that several times I have decided *not* to knit or crochet something for a baby because all I could find in baby yarn weight was saccharine pastels and no kid-friendly bright colors at all).

You're right the choice of colors is often limited, but they do have a lot more choices with most yarns online. Possibly that defeats the purpose of supporting the store, but if you want a special color do check online. :thumbsup:

DogCatMom
01-17-2012, 01:54 AM
I didn't mean that as a criticism of acrylic, probably 90% of what I use is acrylic. I am particularly sensitive to color though and it seems that when I browse through the yarn aisles of craft stores I see yarn that meets my budget, feels nice, but are either strange colors or color combinations, or else in very limited palette (I admit that several times I have decided *not* to knit or crochet something for a baby because all I could find in baby yarn weight was saccharine pastels and no kid-friendly bright colors at all).

Two responses here: one is that the dyeing methods for natural fibers vs. those for synthetics use different dyestuffs (usually) and different mordants (almost always). A lot of natural-fiber yarns are being dyed with natural rather than synthetic dyestuffs right now, too, which often produces more gently colored yarns than otherwise. (And, of course, baby yarns are traditionally pastel; I've always considered myself lucky to find yellow or green!)

My second is to suggest that, if you can use sport-weight and are looking for brightly colored acrylic, you take a look at Knitpicks' "Brava" yarn (http://www.knitpicks.com/yarns/Brava_Sport_Yarn__D5420218.html). It's available in sport, worsted, and bulky weight, but I thought the sport weight would be closest to baby yarn.

Hope this helps, at least some....

DCM

lenaznap
01-17-2012, 02:58 AM
My second is to suggest that, if you can use sport-weight and are looking for brightly colored acrylic, you take a look at Knitpicks' "Brava" yarn (http://www.knitpicks.com/yarns/Brava_Sport_Yarn__D5420218.html). It's available in sport, worsted, and bulky weight, but I thought the sport weight would be closest to baby yarn.
DCM

I just saw the Brava acrylic in a knitpicks newsletter thingy! I am deliberately not going to that site because of it since I know that whatever I decide to get there I will probably end up with twice what I intended in my shopping cart by checkout so I can get more colors. So I'm waiting until my yarn budget is sufficient, but you are right, it looks great.


I know pastels are "traditional" but I guess I'm not.
I can't work with those colors for very long (when I do use soft colors I tend to use dark ones stranded with them to contrast, which makes it more interesting for me at least). Also I remember when I was a toddler (eons ago for sure) I had lots of bright and primary color clothes, bedding, toys, etc. and wonder what happened to those days. It sort of reminds me of the old Lego ad image that has gone viral in the past few weeks "what it is, is beautiful" (http://blog.carolinatrainbuilders.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/what-it-is-is-beautiful-450x621.png) -- not a pastel in sight.

knitcindy
01-17-2012, 10:18 AM
What happened to the original post for this thread?? All I can see is the title and a dot in the actual message!!

Am I missing something or what?!?!?
knitcindy

suzeeq
01-17-2012, 11:03 AM
I think the OP edited it...

Antares
01-17-2012, 12:47 PM
I know pastels are "traditional" but I guess I'm not.
I can't work with those colors for very long (when I do use soft colors I tend to use dark ones stranded with them to contrast, which makes it more interesting for me at least). Also I remember when I was a toddler (eons ago for sure) I had lots of bright and primary color clothes, bedding, toys, etc. and wonder what happened to those days.

I guess I'm not very traditional either because I prefer to use all the pastel colors in baby blankets for both boys and girls. And several years ago Caron had some neon bright yarns (called Brights, I believe) that I used several times in some baby blankets. The mothers who got these blankets LOVED them (I'm not sure what the babies thought of them, though). I still have some left over for more blankets, too!

It looks like Caron no longer sells those neon bright yarns; however, they still have plenty of dark, vibrant colors. The great thing about their medium weight (#4) yarn is that it is very close to sport weight in other yarns, so you can use it for baby blankets (plus, it washes easily).

suzeeq
01-17-2012, 01:59 PM
Simply Soft is a lighter worsted, a dk, but it's heavier than sport weight. I think knitting it on size 4s would be a bit dense. They do have a new line out - SS Light which is more of a sport.

RuthieinMaryland
01-17-2012, 08:40 PM
Hi! :waving:

I'm so happy to be back here after my absence. Hello, all! Good to "see" you!

I grew up in a city (Baltimore, MD) and in the summer "stoop sitting" was the neighborhood custom. After supper everyone would wash up and we'd either put chushions on the front steps or break out the lawn chairs and line them up. Later on, as a young teenager, my mother even ran an extension cord out the window so I could hook up my record player in front of the house and my young friends and I could dance to the popular songs of the day,played on 45 rpm's! :o) Good times!

But, as a younger child of about 10 or 11 I'd sit next to my mom and watch as she worked on crocheting the individual motifs for a lace tablecloth. She'd work and work and when she had 4 done she'd join them with the little "spider web" looking joining motif. I was fascinated!!!!! This was all done with "10 crochet cotton for bedspreads and tablecloths. Many of the other women lined up in their lawn chairs were working on various crochet projects as well.

My project was to make potholders on a small metal loom, the kind where you wove cotton stretchy loops together and then bound off the edges! I must have made a thousand of them during those years, but I really wanted to learn to crochet like the "women"! My mom got me the yarn and a needle and tried to teach me but for some reason it didn't click! I just couldn't grasp what she was trying to show me.

Finally I went to the local 5 & dime store and bought a little Coat's and Clark instruction book on "How to Crochet". I went home, read the book and started working with the crochet cotton. When I got really frustrated with it I'd go to our next door neighbor who was pretty good at figuring out what I was not understanding. Then one day - VOILA! I got it!!!! And once I had the basics it seems my mom and I could communicate much better on the more advanced stuff.

But there started my love affair with crochet, something I avidly pursued for over 50 years. I toyed with knitting as an older teen but lacked the real education I needed. Then about 4 years ago I picked it up again and am totally hooked!!!!!

I can't count how many projects I've done in crochet that have truly enriched my life and the lives of others and now I've added knitting and the projects I've done since to that roster. I'm so grateful for the opportunity I had to sit side by side on lazy summer evenings with my fellow "stoop sitters" and learn the remarkable art of crochet. And I'm also grateful for now becoming a rabid knitter who would climb mountains to find just the right yarn for just the right project! :o)

At this point in my life I love sharing the knowledge of both knitting and crochet with the youngsters around me. It's a legacy that shouldn't be lost to the passage of time and I'd encourage anyone to pass it on to others.

Thanks for listening so I could share this with all of you!

Ruthie :muah: