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fatoldladyinpjs
03-01-2012, 06:13 PM
Adding hoods to sweaters is a new skill I'm learning. Finally got it licked. Third time's the charm. All that's left is weaving in the ends and buttons attached.

The yarn was a delight to use. Joann's Sensations Rainbow Classics brushed bulky acrylic in bright baby pastels. I loved the way this self striped.

GrumpyGramma
03-01-2012, 06:21 PM
That's one sweet sweater. Fabulous and oh so beautiful.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-01-2012, 06:31 PM
Sorry for poor quality. Trying to take this pic with a webcam. Here's a closeup of the colors.

Jan in CA
03-01-2012, 07:50 PM
That's really cute!

salmonmac
03-01-2012, 08:23 PM
Oh please, that is so adorable! You have been veery successful with this sweater and hood. It will look terrific, cozy and warm.

Olha
03-01-2012, 09:23 PM
Those hoods, eh? The sweater turned out great. The colours are so yummy :)

Antares
03-02-2012, 10:04 AM
What a darling little sweater! And the colors are perfect. Will this be for a little girl?

Lucky kiddo!!!

nonny2t
03-02-2012, 10:41 AM
It is really cute. I have made a couple of hooded things and they can be tricky but once you get the hang of it not bad at all.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-02-2012, 11:06 PM
Those hoods, eh? The sweater turned out great. The colours are so yummy :)

Yes, I tamed the hoodie monster! Thanks so much for your help.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-02-2012, 11:13 PM
What a darling little sweater! And the colors are perfect. Will this be for a little girl?

Lucky kiddo!!!

This is for my first grandchild. Emma Lou was born the end of September. I knit her a newborn baby sweater, but she's almost outgrown it. Time for a new bigger one.

Jan in CA
03-03-2012, 02:05 AM
Oh my goodness! Isn't Emma Lou a cutie!!!

salmonmac
03-03-2012, 09:10 AM
She's a beautiful baby and the sweater will look wonderful on her.

Antares
03-03-2012, 11:12 AM
Thanks for sharing the picture of Emma Lou. She's so cute--well, better than cute, but I can't think of the adjective to describe her.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-03-2012, 11:24 AM
Emma's bald, but then so was my daughter when she was that age. She got one tiny curl on top of her head when she was a year old then a full head of curls after that. My daughter has been crocheting her hats to compensate. lol

GrumpyGramma
03-03-2012, 11:57 AM
Such a sweet, beautiful baby. I still like the lovely sweater but the baby wins the cute and sweet contest. Enjoy having a baby around.

The.Knitter
03-03-2012, 12:13 PM
Adding hoods to sweaters is a new skill I'm learning. Finally got it licked. Third time's the charm. All that's left is weaving in the ends and buttons attached.

The yarn was a delight to use. Joann's Sensations Rainbow Classics brushed bulky acrylic in bright baby pastels. I loved the way this self striped.

Gorgeous job! I love this sweater. It will be perfect for Spring!!!

Olha
03-03-2012, 02:21 PM
Awww, baby! :)

justplaincharlotte
03-03-2012, 11:10 PM
How absolutely adorable! :muah:

fatoldladyinpjs
03-04-2012, 09:25 AM
I've gotten some emails about this pattern. In order not to repeat PM replies, I'll talk about the pattern here. I used this one as a base because I've only done one td baby sweater before and never done a hood. First time for that. I detest patterns. I will work one if I really like a pattern, but will usually try to figure out some way to make it easier to do next time, taking measurements as I go. I'm an unconventional knitter. I'm a knitting instructor's worst nightmare. I never knit the technically correct way. I'm always making modifications, which I did with this one. I don't like being chained to a pattern and like to do things in inches. My typical mitten pattern: Knit cuff for three inches. 2 1/2 inches to afterthought thumb, 5 inches straight knitting, and 1/2 inch for decreases. I often figure out my gauge, the measurements I need, and go from there. I think some knitters would call me a designer. I do my own thing. If I don't like something, I change it. I was talking to somebody about a pattern, a balaclava. For the face opening, it has you binding off, casting on more stitches the next row, then later on picking up stitches. I told my knitter friend that I would do this like an afterthought thumb, putting those stitches on waste yarn and working the live stitches later. Anyway, you get the idea of my knitting skills.

This baby sweater pattern had a v neck. I didn't like it so I made it a round neck. The original top down sweater pattern had the stitches marked off in sections, 1,8,14,8, and 1. I changed it to 7,8,14,8,7. I knit this with the increases at the appropriate spots and kept measuring across the back of the sweater at the underarm bottoms from seam to seam as I went. I times this by two for the front also. I increased until I got the proper chest measurements, which was 21 in this case for a 6-12 month size. I then knit straight until I got to the proper length, which was 10 inches from the underarm. I picked up stitches on the arms and knit them in the round, doing the decreases mentioned here, until it was 5 1/2 inches. I knit front button bands. I picked up stitches for the hood and knit it (with a 5 stitch garter border) until it was 7 1/2 inches tall, then did a three needle bind off to join the top.

This would probably make sense to someone like Olha, who I think does the same thing I do. To anyone else I say, break the pattern chain. Dare to do your own thing. Life's too short to be chained to a line by line pattern.

http://fpea.blogspot.com/2007/07/free-pattern-fridays-super-natural.html

fatoldladyinpjs
03-04-2012, 09:33 AM
Here's another FO I did that doesn't have a pattern. I've done these for so long that I know how they are basically constructed and I know my son's measurements. This is my typical knit cuff for three inches, 2 1/2 to afterthought thumb, etc.

http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=108090

IslandTime
03-04-2012, 01:29 PM
Sorry for poor quality. Trying to take this pic with a webcam. Here's a closeup of the colors.


Lovely sweater! Good going - I can't imagine how you got the stripes to line up so well at the sleeve! :star: And, that's one darling gdaughter. :heart: Congrats on both. Hope she lives close by. What fun you're going to have, knitting for her!

GrumpyGramma
03-04-2012, 01:57 PM
Your way makes perfect sense to me. I'm working a top-down cardigan for my daughter and she tried it on after I joined under the arms and so far the fit is what she wants. Now it's just straight knitting to the bottom. I'll have to consult with you on the front bands! I think you could answer my questions in a way that I understand. So far the only thing that comes close to an actual measurement was figuring out how many stitches for the back of the neck, the number of stitches at the sleeve tops was a proportion of that. Sometimes the "right" way to do something is far to complicated for me too grasp. I find myself saying, why not just.....

GrumpyGramma
03-04-2012, 01:59 PM
You inspire me! Last night I worked on mittens for my grandson and no pattern to confuse me. I'll have to see if they fit, I hope so, because I don't really have measurements of his hands. I'm going by what I think and the measurements given in a link you post.

LoveBugAngel
03-04-2012, 07:26 PM
She is ADORABLE! Be sure to post a photo of her wearing the sweater! It's awesome!

fatoldladyinpjs
03-04-2012, 08:25 PM
You inspire me! Last night I worked on mittens for my grandson and no pattern to confuse me. I'll have to see if they fit, I hope so, because I don't really have measurements of his hands. I'm going by what I think and the measurements given in a link you post.

Here's a generic mitten pattern you might like. You can use any needle, any yarn, and any gauge to knit a pair of mittens. I myself don't like making thumb gores. I'm lazy. I knit my mittens as a tube then do an afterthought thumb (putting waste yarn in a few stitches), then keep knitting straight until the decreases for the top. You end up with a left and right mitten, but it's a lot simpler and faster. I've had a problem with traditional mitten patterns. They're a one size fits all. My cuffs always were too big. When I followed this generic pattern, I realized that I have small wrists and wide hands, as much as an inch difference. The mittens I made with this pattern fit beautifully because they were tailor made to my measurements.

http://www.hjsstudio.com/mittens.html

GrumpyGramma
03-04-2012, 09:15 PM
I'm glad you're home, I hope tomorrow is better.

I have to try the afterthought thumb. I had the idea it would be harder. Why? I've no clue.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-04-2012, 11:16 PM
I'm glad you're home, I hope tomorrow is better.

I have to try the afterthought thumb. I had the idea it would be harder. Why? I've no clue.

The only downside, if you want to call it that, is that you can't wear mittens with afterthought thumbs on either hand. You have a definite left and right mitten. This can be difficult if you're doing these for children who can't tell their right from left hand. This isn't a problem for adults or older kids. Kelly explains the afterthought thumb technique really well in her mitten knitting class. However, I knit one stitch then put five stitches on waste yarn. I usually don't need more than that. Kelly does seven stitches, which would be fine if you were knitting mittens for King Kong. I think it's a bit too much. Remember to reverse the thumb to the other side for the second mitten. If you don't, you'll end up with two right hand mittens rather than a pair. It's especially a bummer when you finish the most beautiful complicated convertible mittens only to discover that you have two right mittens rather than a left-right pair. Ask me how I know. Yah, yah. Knit two lefts and give you a pair. lol


http://www.knitpicks.com/tutorials/Kelleys_Mitten_Class-Afterthought_Thumb_Set_Up__D203.html

http://www.knitpicks.com/tutorials/Afterthought_Thumb__D163.html

GrumpyGramma
03-04-2012, 11:56 PM
I'm ready to start after thought thumb mittens bearing in mind that they must be left and right. I could end up knitting 2 pair, too. I found Kelley's mitten class on youtube and have looked at it for help, a lot. I've done several sets of mitts with no fingers and gave up on the patterns fairly early on in the first pair! The mittens I just finished turned out OK but somehow I got the stitches on the thumb tighter and it looks a little odd. When I find out if they fit my grandson, I might decide to amputate the thumbs and redo them.

I've done 2 hoods and thought they came out fine, now I'm wondering if maybe they didn't. You and others obviously have much more experience than I do so if you have had problems with them, what am I missing? The 2 I did were stitched on. I used the 3 needle bind off on a scarf with a hood after I messed up the pattern and had to wing it.

ETA: The sleeve stripes lined up with the body stripes on your sweater like they did because you worked it top down with increases, not stitched together after making the different pieces?

fatoldladyinpjs
03-05-2012, 03:25 AM
Yes, this sweater was top down all in one piece for the body. I then put the stitches for the arms which were on hold back on the needles and knit them in the round. Top down sweaters are shaped like rectangles at first, with the raglan seams being the corners, mitered, which explains why the stripes on the body and top of the sleeves match. I didn't do anything to match them. It just worked out that way.

As for the hood, the stitches were picked up around the neck and knitted in stockinette stitch with a 5 stitch garter border by the face. It was knit as a flat piece and I did a three needle bind off for the hood seam. This was my first time making a hood. I frogged it twice and the third time was the charm. I went online and found one instruction to increase stitches at the back of the hood. This wasn't right. It made the hood way too big. I just picked up stitches along the neckline and knitted them without any increases for my final hood. I did do a little bit of decreasing in the center back of the hood on top to round it a bit. That's only because I don't like pointy hoods.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-05-2012, 10:06 AM
Lovely sweater! Good going - I can't imagine how you got the stripes to line up so well at the sleeve! :star: And, that's one darling gdaughter. :heart: Congrats on both. Hope she lives close by. What fun you're going to have, knitting for her!

Unfortunately, I have yet to meet Emma in person. It's just what I see of her in photos and listening to her coo over the phone. The kids live on the West Coast but are getting ready to sell their house and move back home to Wisconsin.

MerigoldinWA
03-06-2012, 02:10 AM
Pretty little sweater. How does it close? I can't tell.

fatoldladyinpjs
03-06-2012, 11:24 AM
I made button holes for this. But lazy me has yet to sew on the buttons and weave in the ends. Sorry for the confusion.

dturner
03-07-2012, 07:57 PM
Both grand-daughter and the sweater are adorable!

ArtLady1981
03-21-2012, 02:14 PM
A very cute little hoodie! And I'm in MAD LOVE with that pastel variegated yarn, too! You're right, it self-striped just right, instead of globbing and pooling! Love your work!