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vaknitter
03-20-2012, 09:50 PM
seems like there have been a couple of posts lately about insomnia and needing sleep so here's my sleep post. I am pregnant which results in insomnia and difficulty getting comfy to fall asleep and if I wake up it is a nightmare trying to fall back asleep. All of that is made worse by the fact that my hubby snores like a freight train. I've sent him to MD's, sleep clinics etc over the last 5yrs and it is not apnea and the only suggestions we have been given are nose spray and a custom mouth piece ($$ and he hates it). I sleep in our guest room which is about to become baby #2's room so I either have to a-suffocate hubby b-sleep on the couch c-cure hubby's snoring. Anyone have a brilliant suggestion?

Ingrid
03-20-2012, 10:25 PM
If the snoring occurs mostly when he's on his back, sew some tennis balls into he back of his shirt so he can't roll onto his back without discomfort.

I also know of someone who had part of their soft palate removed to help reduce snoring, but I don't think that's for everyone.

Or you could rent him a cheap motel room down the street.:teehee:

Jan in CA
03-21-2012, 12:59 AM
Earplugs. Of any kind, but I use the silicone ones which do tend to stick in your hair if it's long, but boy do they work! If you put your hair in a braid if it's long it's not a big deal IMO. You just have to pull the hairs out in the morning. I reuse them for several nights till they don't feel sticky anymore.

I prefer the silicone to the little spongy ones. The little spongy ones hurt my ears and are hard to put in. This is the type

Like this although they have generic. I usually get them at Target.
http://www.amazon.com/Macks-Pillow-Silicone-Earplugs-Value/dp/B000067NMJ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1332305891&sr=8-1

vaknitter
03-21-2012, 09:53 PM
Jan - I have used earplugs - that is how we made it through the first 5yrs of our marriage. The problem now is that we have a 20month old and I need to be able to hear him if he wakes up. Similarly, I will need to hear the new baby when he wakes up.
My hubby wakes exhausted and is not sleeping well as a result of snoring so we really need to get it figured out but no MD seems to be concerned b/c it is not apnea.

Jan in CA
03-22-2012, 12:10 AM
Ohhh I didn't think of that. I agree you can't wear earplugs. Since he's not sleeping well I'm surprised it's not apnea, too. Maybe a c-pap machine would help even though they say he doesn't have it? Because it creates a positive airway... or something like that?

HandyFamily
03-22-2012, 04:31 AM
seems like there have been a couple of posts lately about insomnia and needing sleep so here's my sleep post. I am pregnant which results in insomnia and difficulty getting comfy to fall asleep and if I wake up it is a nightmare trying to fall back asleep. All of that is made worse by the fact that my hubby snores like a freight train. I've sent him to MD's, sleep clinics etc over the last 5yrs and it is not apnea and the only suggestions we have been given are nose spray and a custom mouth piece ($$ and he hates it). I sleep in our guest room which is about to become baby #2's room so I either have to a-suffocate hubby b-sleep on the couch c-cure hubby's snoring. Anyone have a brilliant suggestion?

Year plugs?

Jan in CA
03-22-2012, 01:57 PM
Year plugs?

She posted above that she can't do that because she has a toddler and a baby on the way. Has to be able to hear them.

TEMA
03-24-2012, 10:19 PM
Gad, it sure sounds like sleep apnea to me. My hubby has suffered from it for years and has been on a Cpap machine for almost 10 years now. What a blessing!
He gets his needed sleep and doesn't walk around like a zombie these days. HE's getting the oxygen he needs and the sleep he needs.
Personally, I'd get a second opinion....
The only other thing I can think of is to make him turn over on his side when he's snoring.
Mostly snoring is a symptom of a greater problem and if it keeps up like this, it is more than likely that 'greater' problem will show itself but by then, it may be too late.
TEMA

Antares
03-25-2012, 11:12 PM
Yes, I vote for a second opinion for hubby and maybe even get the machine anyway to see if it will help.

Earplugs are great (even though I know you can't use them, vaknitter). Just don't do what one of my friends did: She dreamed she was eating taquitos one night, and woke up chewing on one of her earplugs! :oo: EWWWW! But that story cracks me up every time I think about it!

vaknitter
04-12-2012, 04:01 PM
Thank you for the input. Unfortunately, we cannot get a CPAP machine w/out a script and we can't get a script b/c he does not have apnea. I actually am going to have to jump through hoops to get him an appt at the one clinic in town he hasn't been too b/c he was already told he doesn't have apnea. They will require a referral and I'm guessing our GP isn't going to be pleased to hear from me again regarding this issue.

Jan in CA
04-12-2012, 11:17 PM
That's terrible that you can't get what he needs. It seems obvious those not even involved here that he has a bigger problem than just snoring. :doh:

Antares
04-13-2012, 12:29 PM
Okay maybe I'm a dunce, but your health and your husband's health should be something you have control over. So if one doctor doesn't help you or won't refer you, then find another one--in fact, keep looking until you find someone who will help you.

Furthermore, if you think he needs the machine, and you can't pay for it up front, make monthly payments on it. If it's insurance that's keeping you from getting the machine, go around it. Look online for machines. Ask your doctor to get one for you. You can figure out how to pay for it without insurance!! Look on eBay and see if you can find a used one!!

I've heard that if you're dealing with a doctor who refuses to find problems/treatments, then you should have them sign a document saying such (that is, that they refused to help you).

This puts doctors over a barrel and makes them a little more eager to go the extra mile (since if something does go awry, you have a signed document that states they refused to find/treat the problem).

bambi
04-15-2012, 05:44 AM
My husband was also very loud with his snoring. He had a severely deviated nasal septum. He has since had surgery to correct that and is much better. Not to say that he never snores but it is better.

Also, if your husband has a glass of wine or beer at night, have him skip that and see if it helps. Alcohol is notorious for relaxing the soft palate and worsening snoring. If he is overweight, he needs to lose wt. Side sleeping instead of back sleeping is also useful.

I would not recommend getting a used medical device on E-Bay and using it without a prescription. CPAP machines are not something to mess around with.

Congratulations on the new baby!

Jan in CA
04-15-2012, 02:25 PM
Now that Bambi mentioned deviated septum I remember I had a friend with that and she also snored and had breathing issues at night. She got it fixed and now she's fine. Maybe check into that, too. An ENT would probably be the best one to check with.

fatoldladyinpjs
04-16-2012, 09:56 AM
Year plugs?

Handy, this is EAR plugs. It's a small molded piece of plastic or rubber that you place in your ears so you can't hear sounds. It's mostly used in factories to protect a person from losing their hearing when noisy machines are running. Sometimes people put them in their ears if they have to sleep with a spouse that snores. But this lady can't use them because she has to be able to hear the toddler if she cries.

vaknitter
04-17-2012, 10:16 PM
Thank you for all the suggestions - I am going to pursue getting him an appt at the other ENT clinic and ask specifically about the deviated septum. I have no problem fighting the MD's or the insurance company : ) I am not comfortable buying a CPAP machine on our own b/c I have no way of knowing that he needs it or if it is safe for him to use if he does not have apnea.
Bambi - I do think part of it is his fitness level and we have talked at length about that and he is working on that. He is not overweight, but he used to swim competatively and is no longer doing that and our dog passed away so he is not walking the block and running around in the yard like he did.
Oddly enough he had an appendectomy a few weeks ago and has barely snored since then....

Antares
04-18-2012, 12:25 PM
What I meant was that if he NEEDS the machine but insurance or doctors won't allow him to have one, then you can go about finding one through unconventional means. And there are ways of getting used items checked out to make sure they work properly, so don't knock that avenue just yet!

Good luck with getting this fixed!

Jan in CA
04-18-2012, 12:37 PM
What I meant was that if he NEEDS the machine but insurance or doctors won't allow him to have one, then you can go about finding one through unconventional means. And there are ways of getting used items checked out to make sure they work properly, so don't knock that avenue just yet!

Good luck with getting this fixed!

That's just it though. I agree with Vaknitter.. The doctors say her DH doesn't need one because according to them he doesn't have sleep apnea. Vaknitter isn't a doctor so getting a machine w/o the doctors approval isn't a good idea.

bambi
04-18-2012, 04:08 PM
I'm sure there may be a reason why the appy helped but I can't think of what that might be right now. Hope the ENT helps.

Antares
04-19-2012, 11:28 AM
That's just it though. I agree with Vaknitter.. The doctors say her DH doesn't need one because according to them he doesn't have sleep apnea. Vaknitter isn't a doctor so getting a machine w/o the doctors approval isn't a good idea.

Okay! I'm not saying to get one if he DOES NOT need it. I never said that. But it sounds like ONE doctor says he doesn't need it. Second opinions and third opinions, though, are definitely worthwhile. So I say again, if it turns out that he DOES need it and can't get it because of doctors/insurance, then find a way to get it.

(Shesh! Why is this even being debated?)

Jan in CA
04-19-2012, 01:46 PM
(Shesh! Why is this even being debated?)

:hug: I was just giving my two cents. You are correct though that he needs more opinions and that there are ways to get one. I would hope if a doctor says he does have apnea he'd be able to get one without any hassle, but who knows.

LongShanks
04-19-2012, 04:56 PM
I have sleep apnea and you should be aware that as already said that a prescription is needed for both the machine and mask. These can be very expensive without insurance, say in the $800 to $1,000 range. Because of the risk of bacterial growth in these machine I would be concerned about a used machine unless you know how to clean.

Then there is the question of the setting for the pressure. The machine maintains a positive airway pressure. This is used to "blow open" (my words) the air passage. To low and the airway is not open, to high and it is uncomfortable.

There is a simple test that can be run with a recording pulse/oxygen meter that can trace the level of oxygen in the blood during the night. If the oxygen level is high through out the night a CPAP machine may not needed (only a doctor can say for sure), if it gets low then this could given your doctor to insight to have further testing.

I personally do not agree with Doctor shopping, but, if you do not have faith in your Doctor look for another.