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View Full Version : Dem Old Winter Blues


MrsBear87
10-28-2005, 10:23 AM
The furnace is on, and my hands are already taking on their crone-like winter texture - dry, hard, mean.

So what's a knittin' gal to do? I can actually snag yarn on these claws!

What do my fellow knitters use or do to keep their hands soft in these dry times? I've done everything from pumice stones to gloves on overnight with hand lotion.

Opinions, please!

LisaD715
10-28-2005, 11:16 AM
Lotion Lotion Lotion...Try Udder Cream, it is a bit thicker than most, or Neutrogenia Hand Cream. The trick is to have some moisture on your hands before you apply lotion, so it adheres and helps to lock in the moisture. Wash your hands with warm, not hot, water before, then apply lotion. You may want to consider using a milder dishwashing soap too. That is REALLY drying. Another thing is don't use super hot water, it is VERY drying.

margie
10-28-2005, 11:41 AM
I have found that most any kind of lotion made by Aveeno works well for me.I am constantly washing my hands during the day, so my hands get horribly dry. Aveeno has one that is called "intense relief hand cream".

hedgehog
10-28-2005, 11:44 AM
Dishwashing detergent (and shampoo, and soap, etc..) all have a detergent called Sodium Laurel Sulfate in it that will dry out your skin. It strips the oils and disrupts the proteins in your skin cells.

Also, the dry winter air means that the skin cells lose a lot more moisture than they normally would. This will speed up the programmed demise of these cells because the loss of water decreases or hinders the cells' normal functions.

So try and avoid using too many harsh detergents (and things with Sodium Laurel Sulfate) or at least wear gloves while doing dishes. Also, make sure you put on a lot of lotion that has some sort of "grease" to it: shea butter, cocoa butter, petroleum, etc... this will help to create a water barrier to keep the moisture in and also will be the first to go if you come in contact with detergents (instead of your skin's natural proteins and oils).

When things get really bad, slather "greasy" lotion on at night and sleep with cotton gloves on to make sure i hydrate the top layer of skin as much as possible.

Sorry for sounding like a commercial, but i hope this helps!
-hh

hedgehog
10-28-2005, 11:47 AM
Oh, and one more thing!

Make sure you keep your cuticles soft too as they will tend to dry out and peel and cause larger areas of cell death (dryness).

I use Burt's Bees Cuticle Cream but there are other oil based products.

-hh

JessicaR
10-28-2005, 12:03 PM
I have a parfin hand bath. It's knida a pain to operate and keep on, but it works wonders! I first bought mine when I was working in a kitchen and with all the hand washing my hands were actually cracking. This fixed them right up and it feels so good!

AidanM
10-28-2005, 12:04 PM
Some lotion that my Aunt makes. It's key thing is beeswax, and it's really nice stuff. It sort of feels like your hands are just getting greasey, and the more you rub it in the more it feels greasey, but then when you stop and just ignore them for a while you find that it's sunk into your skin.

LisaD715
10-28-2005, 12:06 PM
I love the Burt's Bees cuticle cream....I keep one in my desk at work, and one on my nightstand. Same wiht their lip balm. I work with paper all day which is very drying. Their normal to dry lotion is a bit thinner that I like though. Good summertime lotion for me.

Julie
10-28-2005, 12:30 PM
I have never been a big lotion user, not brand loyal, etc -- but I think I've discovered my be-all, end all lotion. It's made a lotion lover out of me: Olay Quench. It's faaaabulous. :thumbsup:

silveridger
10-28-2005, 01:22 PM
In addition to the excellent advice already given... look for some kind of barrier moisturizer, which will help lock moisture IN, and apply it to moist hands. Avon's Silicone Glove is a good one... I make a knitter's hand balm with lots of beeswax, cocoa butter, shea butter, & lanolin. It's a solid bar that you rub between your hands so it "melts" from the friction and body heat. Burt's Bees makes something similar, as does Heal My Hands. It's nice to put on just before you knit, since it seems to seal your skin and prevent snagging.

InterNette
10-28-2005, 01:25 PM
oh your knitters hand blam sounds wonderful. I need a major balm for my feet. I tend to be barefoot 90% of the time. Tried Z's crack creme though it stinks of cloves heavily. Do you have a recommendation for something extra strength for that?

Merry Stitcher
10-28-2005, 02:53 PM
I recently discovered Aquaphor (http://www.aquaphorhealing.com/). It's perfect for soothing "winter knitters hands" (and heels!). I found it in my grocery store's "health and beauty" aisle. So, I think it's pretty readily available.

Lasts forever, too. A little dab will do ya!

katiyana
10-28-2005, 03:25 PM
Bath and Body Works has a cream that is made with marshmallows - its from France - and its absolutely wonderful for moisturizing the skin. I started using it on my elbows and ankles, which are always dried up and icky, and it made a world of difference.

I'm going to be using it on my hands this winter as well and hopefully it'll have the same great result!

VictoiseC
10-29-2005, 03:18 PM
Man I know exactly what you mean. Here it comes.

I wish I had a parafin bath thingy! But they cost a lot, like $60 or more I think?

One great GREAT thing to use, oh my god it's unbelievable, is any handcream you can get made from sheep/wool/lanolin. I've bought this twice so far and it's so totally worth it. I just got another kind at the NY Wool & Sheep festival last weekend. It was $7 for a small jar but it lasts a long time and is way efficient. I just looked at the ingredients and it does have beeswax in it, in addition to lanolin, almond oil, witch hazel.... If you get desperate and want to try it you can order this one I have from Baitsholts Farms (they have an email address) but you have to pay shipping on top of that $7. It's so nice, called Wool Butter.

But, a lot yarn stores have this stuff. Give it a try come January when the cracks are gettin really big!

Knitwise
10-31-2005, 06:52 PM
I love my Bath and Body works purley silk body lotion. It's the only one that I found that softens my feet. So I use it for hands and everything too.

rebecca
10-31-2005, 07:44 PM
Oh, baby, baby....my Baby :inlove: Baby got me a paraffin wax spa and I am in :heart: :heart: with it!! AND he always goes to Bath & Body Works and brings me surprises like my very fave cream with shea butter. I would love to get my hands on some natural shea butter, I've seen it on TV, I have forgotten the name of the manufacturer, but when next I see it...I want it ;)
Oh, and after the paraffin waxing of the hands, the oil that is left on your hands is great to rub on bamboo needles...briskly rub the bamboo in your hands & as your hands heat up & friction begins the bamboo sucks in the oils and it is then ever so smooth to knit with :D

InterNette
10-31-2005, 08:28 PM
eeew sounds dreamy. I hear they are good for arthirtus as well. Did you dunk your feet too? Go on and do it.

rebecca
10-31-2005, 11:41 PM
Oh yeah, I do feet, elbows, everything. I paint my hip and leg..it helps with the pain from all of my hip replacements, other hip surgeries & really helps after hip dislocation!! I realllllly love it!!!

feministmama
11-01-2005, 01:38 PM
Anything with beeswax or almond oil is great for me. There is a local bee dude here in Oregon that sells this wonderful bee and herb stuff that is outta this world. Maybe you have a local farmers market near you?

Angelia
11-01-2005, 08:30 PM
I have horribly dry skin and the dreaded excema...dry winter air is really horrible and downright painful.

But, I've found that if I slather on Eucerin cream (or any other heavy cream--not lotion b/c it's too watery) at night before going to sleep, really work it into my cuticles, and then put on cotton gloves, my hands stay moisturized most of the next day (though I do still put on a non-greasy lotion like Aveeno after washing my hands). The trick, of course, is keeping the gloves on while sleeping...

Oh, and the same holds true for dry feet: slather them with cream, put on socks, then sleep away the dryness!

It's not really very romantic wearing socks and gloves to bed, but it keeps the dry skin at bay during the winter :D

LisaD715
11-02-2005, 01:15 AM
I was thinking, someone mentioned a moisture barrier, would something like A&D ointment work to help lock moisture in as well? I mean we use it on our lil ones bums to help prevent chapped skin, why wouldn't it work for hands?

I jsut got my Body Shop order (FINALLY....long story) and got body butter, it WORKS so well!!!! (I got coconut) and it kept my legs soft all day. Maybe that will work too.

silveridger
11-03-2005, 12:17 PM
I'm getting a kick out of following along here, it's invaluable to hear comments about lotions, creams & balms from the customer's point of view. As a soap maker who also dabbles in lotions, creams, & balms, I can tell you that the toiletries lists and soap lists are always agonizing about including lanolin in products, since many people claim to be allergic to it (those who are sensitive to wool, for example, often react to lanolin too). The knitters balm I make is the only thing I put lanolin in, on the assumption that most knitters won't mind the lanolin and in fact prefer it. Since we're discussing moisturizers, you might be interested to know that most lotions contain 75%-80% water. Creams are usually exactly the same thing as lotions with considerably less water and a higher proportion of relatively stiff ingredients like beeswax or cocoa butter, so they're thicker. Balms generally have no water at all, and can be made without a preservative (it's the water in products that provides the medium for bacteria & mold to grow: anything with water in it will either contain a preservative or require refrigeration). In cases of severe dryness, a barrier type moisturizer applied to damp or freshly moisturized skin will lock in the moisture while protecting a rough or irritated surface with a neutral but thin coating (like the parafin bath does). A&D would probably work fine, although it's designed for the relatively protected environment inside a diaper: your hands are uncovered and exposed and would probably benefit from something a bit stiffer. I don't remember, it's been a long time since I had babies in the house: is it A&D that has that fishy smell? That might be an issue as well :lol: . Many people swear by pure shea butter as a heavy duty moisturizer. I like the extra protection of some beeswax & lanolin for long-term protection. People have wildly different reactions to each product: for example, some people swear by Bath & Body Works, others can't stand it. Read the label: many commercial products contain a host of synthetic and/or petroleum based ingredients. These are not necessarily bad: vaseline is 100% cosmetic-grade petrolatum, a highly refined petroleum product. But if you're concerned about such things, you may find it surprising to compare cosmetic labels.