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View Full Version : Cottage Licenses?


ChroniclesofYarnia
12-08-2005, 01:04 PM
Anyone here have one? Can you tell me a bit about it and your experience?

I am considering goign through littleturtleknits or woolywonder to knit soaker and such, but it makes me nervous to drop that much money without really understanding what will happen afterward.

Thanks!
Christina

kemp
12-08-2005, 02:31 PM
I guess it really depends if you think their patterns are that great and if you think you'll be able to sell enough soakers and such to offset the $250 fee.

Carol_OH
12-08-2005, 03:30 PM
what's a Cottage License?

Julie
12-08-2005, 03:32 PM
It's basically a license to sell things you've made with a copyrighted pattern...a la http://woolywonder.com/licensing.php

kemp
12-08-2005, 03:33 PM
You can read about it here (http://www.littleturtleknits.com/pages/licensing.php)

Basically, it allows you to use their patterns to make items for sale.

feministmama
12-08-2005, 04:51 PM
Oh this sounds cool. Its like your a private contracotr for knitting :cheering: :cheering: :cheering: Hmmm.... I wonder if this could really work :thinking:

brightspot
12-08-2005, 05:41 PM
I know you can't sell things from copywrited patterns that you get for free, but I was wondering if you could from patterns that you buy. I wanted to sell a few things at the farmer's market.

Julie
12-08-2005, 05:50 PM
Depends on the copyright terms -- LTK patterns are pricey but you still have to pay the licensing fee if you want to knit & sell. It's always best to check with the copyright holder. :D

brightspot
12-08-2005, 05:54 PM
I think the patterns I wanted was from e patterns central.

nicolethegeek
12-08-2005, 05:56 PM
I know you can't sell things from copywrited patterns that you get for free, but I was wondering if you could from patterns that you buy. I wanted to sell a few things at the farmer's market.

It all depends on the terms of use {if specified} by the designer/copyright holder. I have a terms of use page on my website that covers all of my designs whether they are free or paid. When in doubt, contact the copyright holder.

CarmenIbanez
12-08-2005, 05:59 PM
I don't want to appear anti-pattern writer here, because I believe that patterns are artwork like any other and deserve the same protection. But is it worth it to buy the rights to a pattern when it can be modified to be your own original creation? And would this be unethical? I would never want to do something that is wrong. I myself have only ever created one original pattern in my life. Everything else I have done has been "inspired" by something else.

kemp
12-09-2005, 10:07 AM
That is a whole big copyright discussion...but here is what it says from copyright.gov

"How much do I have to change in order to claim copyright in someone else's work?
Only the owner of copyright in a work has the right to prepare, or to authorize someone else to create, a new version of that work. Accordingly, you cannot claim copyright to another's work, no matter how much you change it, unless you have the owner's consent. See Circular 14, Copyright Registration for Derivative Works."

There are other things involved, like how long the work has been copyrighted, etc. For example, after a certain number of years, a copyright works becomes pulbic domain and can then be used for derivitive works.

The whole issue is a little more complicated with patterns since there is a somewhat limited way to design certain things. Here is another discussion more relavant to knitting patterns at knitty.com: http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall03/FEATcopyright.html

CarmenIbanez
12-09-2005, 12:33 PM
Yeah, it is a very sticky situation. The funny thing is, as knitters, we know that you can change ONE stitch on each row and have a completely different look to a piece. And it's such a shallow pool of variations. You might create something completely from scratch and have it be exactly like someone else's. YIKES! I'm glad I'm not much in the knitting business. :-)