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View Full Version : How do you keep your knitting away from your small children?


Darhain
01-15-2006, 12:29 PM
I am so frustrated! DD just ripped out a HUGE amount of my Irish Hiking Scarf. I was almost finished with it, and she probably destroyed two hours worth of work. :( Not to mention that trying to figure out where I am in a cabled pattern is really difficult for me -- I'm just not that good yet.

The thing is, it was in my knitting bag, which was stowed on the top shelf of my closet. DD is two, but she's a monkey, and can climb anywhere. The top shelf of the closet is a good eight feet tall, but that didn't stop her! And all while I was helping her brother get a snack, so it didn't take her long.

What do you do to keep your knitting away from your kids? (Assuming you have kids.) I am starting to think I need a freakin' lock box to keep my knitting safe. This is not the first time this has happened, and I know she's just curious about what I am doing, but still ... ARRRGGHH!

knitterma
01-15-2006, 12:37 PM
Holy cow! She got way up there, eh? Maybe you could make a small knitting organizer for hanging on the wall - in a high place, with no climbing apparatus nearby. :lol:

joe_doufu
01-15-2006, 12:50 PM
Work a strand of electric fence wire into the knitting. After she gets shocked by two or three separate projects she'll be conditioned and probably never your knitting again.

When she's 25 and her friends are trying to get her into knitting, she won't undersand why she gets the shivers and freaks out in the presence of yarn and needles.

(just kidding!)

Ingrid
01-15-2006, 12:53 PM
Work a strand of electric fence wire into the knitting. After she gets shocked by two or three separate projects she'll be conditioned and probably never your knitting again.

When she's 25 and her friends are trying to get her into knitting, she won't undersand why she gets the shivers and freaks out in the presence of yarn and needles.

(just kidding!)

:roflhard:

Maybe you could set her up with her own 'knitting bag'? Just some yarn and notions--no needles, of course. Maybe if she has that to play with she won't go after yours.

Other than that, a briefcase with a lock. :rofling:

Lana
01-15-2006, 12:54 PM
I guess I was lucky. My kids learned their boundries easily and early. "As soon as I finish this row" taught them I wasn't going to jump every time they wanted something.

I had a SIL who had a climber. Found her at 10 mos sitting on the kitchen table eating sugar from the bowl. At 3 yrs she fell off the tall chest of drawers and broke her clavicle (can't think of the other term).

"Creative" childern require creative parenting. Good luck.

Lana
01-15-2006, 12:57 PM
I just read Joe's reply. Way ta go Joe!!!
:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

dustinac
01-15-2006, 01:06 PM
:roflhard: to Joe's reply

My daughter is two and nothing stops here either except I bought a bag that had a lock on it wasn't what you would consider a knitting bag but it worked to keep her out of it but I hated that I had to keep locking it ... Now I can keep things in my orange bag closed up and she cannot get in it... I like Ingrid's idea cause Roo when I do forget and leave something down I catch her trying to knit with it.. or while I'm knitting she trys to hold the yarn like me.. she knows she is not suppose to get into it so if I do catch her she usually throws it and runs off laughing :rollseyes: they also know mommy has to finish a row before they get what they want.. which took time to work on cause they were used to me just jumping when they said mommmmmiiiieeeeeeeeeeeee :D

butterflymama
01-15-2006, 01:07 PM
Is your refrigerator tall? If so, you could store it up there. My son is 2 and quite the climber but my fridge is really tall so even when he pushes a chair over he cannot reach it as long as it is not on the edge.

Sorry she ripped it out but, in her defense, that must have been so much fun! :lol:

Jan in CA
01-15-2006, 02:21 PM
How old is your daughter? If she's old enough you can start teaching her about "mommy's toys" and "DD's toys". Put it in a locked box for now and tell her that is mommy's toybox.

If she's very young I would be careful giving her yarn. Keep an eye on her with it as she might eat it or choke herself.

Darhain
01-15-2006, 03:47 PM
Work a strand of electric fence wire into the knitting. After she gets shocked by two or three separate projects she'll be conditioned and probably never your knitting again.

When she's 25 and her friends are trying to get her into knitting, she won't undersand why she gets the shivers and freaks out in the presence of yarn and needles.

(just kidding!)

:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

Actually, DH and I were just joking about putting up an electric fence around my computer last night. :shock: DD climbed the safety gate over the door to my office, climbed up on my desk, and inserted some "moneys" (that would be coins) into the CD ROM drive. We had to replace the whole drive unit (a dual drive, so also a DVD/R drive) last night as the "moneys" completely destroyed the thing.

In the past, DD has been known to climb over the safety gate, climb up on my desk, and attempt to eat the pushpins in the corkboard on the wall over my desk. (It's no longer hanging on the wall over my desk, as you might imagine.) The refrigerator is out, too -- I found her on the top of the fridge at 13 months. I'm telling you, I gave birth to a monkey! She is totally fearless! Luckily, we haven't had any trips to the ER with her, thus far!

We are working on the "mama's things" vs "DD's things". Like I said, she's two, so that's just now starting to maybe mean something to her.

Thanks for all the replies! I really needed to vent!

Jan in CA
01-15-2006, 04:51 PM
You need a tall, climb proof baby gate. Or maybe a lockable screen door! :roflhard:

Ingrid
01-15-2006, 04:54 PM
Inquiring minds need to know!

She is quite the monkey! :D

rebecca
01-15-2006, 05:05 PM
Your child seems very inquisitive & intelligent! So, you could always give her some yarn & teach her to do finger knitting (or her version of it! There is a video of it here (http://www.diynetwork.com/diy/na_knitting/article/0,2025,DIY_14141_4155404,00.html), just scroll down the page a bit ;)

Arugula
01-15-2006, 05:38 PM
my boys love my needles, that is what they get in my knitting for and usually they pull out/destroy a few rows trying to figure out how to pull the needles out of the knitting. I have a pair of cheap thrift store needles I give them on occasion but I have started just keeping it off limits. My kids don't climb but I agree that you need a lock. Maybe a hook and eye at the top of the door, they have locking hooks she probably couldn't open...

jessi_9783
01-15-2006, 05:46 PM
I had a SIL who had a climber. Found her at 10 mos sitting on the kitchen table eating sugar from the bowl. At 3 yrs she fell off the tall chest of drawers and broke her clavicle (can't think of the other term).
Poor kid.http://img117.echo.cx/img117/5600/smile0034db.gif I've broken my collarbone plenty of times in my life and the collarbone and the tailbone hurt the worst of all. Trust me, I've broken just about every bone in my body multiple times.

Darhain
01-15-2006, 06:11 PM
Your child seems very inquisitive & intelligent!

She is very inquisitive and intelligent! Both of my children are very inquisitive and intelligent! It's kinda scary sometimes -- they are always looking for a new challenge, learning new things, looking for adventure. For example, they both figured out the squeezy safety door handles (so that children can't open a door, supposedly) before 18 months of age. I used to run a daycare and had five-year-olds who couldn't get those things, but neither of my kids was slowed in the least. Yes, inquiring minds do want to know, Ingrid! That's it exactly!

Being a mom is the most fantastic thing in the world!!!! But it sure can be the most frustrating thing at times, too. :lol: Guess I'll just have to put a lock on my closet door and stash my knitting in there every time I put it down. I already had to buy a safe for all of our medicine -- none of the child locks kept them out of the cabinets, either -- so maybe I'll get another for my knitting! :roflhard: My DH would find that incredibly hilarious ... but then again, he's got a door with a lock in his music studio, so he can laugh it up all he wants.

Jan, you would not believe the amount of money we have invested in different baby gates! I don't think they make one that is climb proof for my DD, honestly. I know they say they are, but then she just goes right up over them, and she's QUICK, too!

Thanks for the finger knitting link, Rebecca! I think DS would LOVE that, though I'm not sure DD is ready for it. We'll give it a try and see.

Now, to try to save my scarf ...

Cristy
01-15-2006, 07:23 PM
My dd is 3 and when I start some knitting she gets some of the yarn to play with. Miraculously (Sp?) this has kept her away from my knitting. When she was a year old, my needles used to go missing...one day, I picked up my guitar to play (I don't play much anymore but it stays on it's stand in my bedroom) and I heard an awful racket...she was hiding them inside of my guitar! LOL! Good luck--I've had a few disasters like that...

koolbreeze
01-15-2006, 07:34 PM
my 7 month old is the only one of my kids that will touch it. and i always know because its wet. other that she does no real damage. get one of those totes that you have to press the button to open.

blueeyes28
01-15-2006, 07:40 PM
my son is the same way and my mother in law had a great idea she said I should buy a bunch of adhesive velcro and start hanging everything from the ceiling :roflhard: :roflhard:

Sara
01-15-2006, 07:52 PM
The problem with putting "the preciouss-s--sss" up on appliances or bookcases is that the little darlings climb and things can fall over on them. Hanging a basket isn't a bad idea, but my little one would tip things out of it with the broom handle. (homo habilis)

The screen door is really a good idea.

dustinac
01-15-2006, 09:15 PM
My 5yr old was my climber only thing was he would climb up on anything then try to fly like planes.. I'm glad those days are over and my 2yr old keeps her feet on the ground... If they get an idea they just go for it.. you can buy hooks to help hold like bookcases things like that on your wall...

I gave Ruthie Roo some yarn and blunt needles today to see if she would enjoy that lol she just came back over to mine and played with the yarn that was coming out of the skein.. :lol:

BinkyKat
01-15-2006, 10:49 PM
My friends don't approve of my "it works on my cat" mindset for parenting....squirt her in the face with a water bottle!
:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

Ingrid
01-15-2006, 11:12 PM
My friends don't approve of my "it works on my cat" mindset for parenting....squirt her in the face with a water bottle!
:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

BinkyKat
01-15-2006, 11:19 PM
:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:

What? :oo:

:roflhard:

Julie
01-15-2006, 11:20 PM
but then again, he's got a door with a lock in his music studio
Maybe you could put your knitting in his music studio? :thumbsup:

Darhain
01-16-2006, 01:01 AM
but then again, he's got a door with a lock in his music studio
Maybe you could put your knitting in his music studio? :thumbsup:

No, we have an agreement that it is his room and I don't keep anything in there. I've probably been in the room three times in the last two months. It's his space and I respect that.

I have my own space, too. Problem is, it's the short end of an L shaped room, and there isn't really a door. More of a six foot opening -- we actually custom ordered a baby gate for the opening, as the other part of the L is the kid's play room. That would work great if DD couldn't climb the gate -- I'd be able to work in my office/craft room while they were playing in the same space.

Think if I hobbled her it would be a problem?!? :roflhard:

Ingrid
01-16-2006, 01:34 AM
:roflhard: Take the yarn that she ripped out of your scarf and wrap it around her ankles. That'll show her!! :rofling:

dustinac
01-16-2006, 09:13 AM
My friends don't approve of my "it works on my cat" mindset for parenting....squirt her in the face with a water bottle!
:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard:



:roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: :roflhard: My cat trys to get outside everytime the door opens so we have to have a bottle of water to scare her by so she doesn't get outside :blush:

nicolethegeek
01-16-2006, 01:32 PM
Dustina, your two sound like my two youngest! I could go on forever about the things my 3 year old has done and could get into. After he started the fire in the living room in October, we started calling him "Dennis the Menace"... he means well, BUT SHEESH!!! LOL!!! DH and I said that we should rent Alex out to those factories that make child-proof items. If it takes him longer than 5 minutes to figure out how to work it {or take it apart!} without being shown at all, they've got themselves a winner for nearly every other kid on the planet!!! Another idea for us was to rent him out to nanny services to train their nannies. If they could survive 2 hours with him, they can get through anything! :roflhard: Lissa just turned 2 and is following in her big brother's footsteps. Her favourite place to play is on the kitchen table or on the kitchen counters {gets up herself!}. The top of the fridge isn't a safe place at my house either. Hooks on doors are simply a deterrent. They are very easy to unhook using the business end of a broom you know! :rollseyes:

Anyway... to keep them away from your knitting... you can't really! They will figure out a way to get at it no matter what! All you can do is make it more difficult for them, and easier for you to recover. Lissa's favourite pastime these days is knitting too... problem is she thinks knitting is taking the needles out of whatever I'm working on! Our bedroom door has a key lock on it, and that is where I'm supposed to keep my WIPs if I don't want the kids to get at it. Lifelines truly ARE lifelines. Diversions are a wonderful tool too. DS and DD both love playing with Barbies, and certain DVDs and cartoon shows are also a great tactic. I also keep a ball or two of yucky yarn that I don't like around, and will give either one of them a crochet hook or a pair of needles and let them play to their heart's content with it. I'm just thankful that the rest of my brood are grown out of that... 'cept that they crochet and knit for real now, and that takes away from *my* stash! :rofling:

feministmama
01-16-2006, 02:47 PM
Put some vaseline or olive oil on the bars of the baby gates.

brendajos
01-16-2006, 02:49 PM
Put some vaseline or olive oil on the bars of the baby gates.

omg.... :rofling: :roflhard: :rofling:

Cristy
01-16-2006, 03:11 PM
My dh would get the biggest kick outta this thread--he's all about trying to outsmart dd....