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View Full Version : practical use of knit washcloth...stupid question


hedgewick
03-09-2006, 05:09 PM
I feel silly asking this but I'll go ahead. I see a lot of you making knit washcloths. I have never seen or used one before but it seems like a good way to practice stitches and such. My question is how do knit washcloths compare with the regular cloth ones you get in the store? Do they clean any better or worse? What about for your face? Very abrasive? Just curious. Thanks!

butterflymama
03-09-2006, 05:17 PM
I use 100% cotton and I like them much better. I have 2 messy boys and they seem to 'grip' better than regular dishcloths. I use them for everything, and I love them! They last longer because they do not get thin like regular dishcloths.

I want to make some super soft face cloths out of cotton chenille. Yum.

Jenelle
03-09-2006, 05:32 PM
I have to agree with butterflymama about how well they stand up. My mom and gram still have dishcloths that my great grandma knitted back in 1987. That prooves how long they last :rofling:

hedgewick
03-09-2006, 05:35 PM
that's encouraging! Maybe they would also be good for dishes and cleaning too. I buy those cheap blue (or green) and white strip cloths that come in a pack (not sure who makes them) and they work well but don't hold up very long. A knit one may be just what I need.

Jan in CA
03-09-2006, 05:42 PM
I made a bunch of them out of Sugar and Cream (http://www.sugarncream.com/) and while they make great dishcloths I wouldn't use them on my face. They just aren't soft enough. However that abrasiveness works great for cleaning counters or dishes! I got rid of my sponge and use them all the time now.

quirky
03-09-2006, 05:56 PM
My husband often asks "what good is it"?
I just tell him that at the end of the world department store shoppers will be running around naked and he will be cozy and warm.

At the end of the world I imagine there will be no more mass produced sponges - knitting dish cloths is yet another useful item to help us survive when everyone else is having shopping withdrawls. :rofling:

Vermilion Sparrow
03-09-2006, 06:06 PM
Yeah, most of my friends, when they found out I knitted, suggested I should perhaps go make friends with their grandmothers... (though not quite as nicely as that :mad:)

I told them not to come crying to me when Armageddon comes and they don't have anything to wear.

Honestly, I haven't tried dishcloths yet. I've done some potholders and trivets, but beyond that I've been working on an afghan, and now socks. Seems to me that knitted things would be great for scrubbing, though.

hedgewick
03-09-2006, 06:10 PM
I have a bunch of cheap yarn that doesn't have a label so I don't know what it is. kind of like craft yarn... maybe red heart or something. Also have one that is like baby yarn...sport weight I think. Do you all think that stuff would work ok for this or should it be cotton? I don't know what else to do with it. I could use 2 strands together to make it thicker and go faster.

bjc1050
03-09-2006, 07:28 PM
I like knitted dishcloths much better than crocheted ones. They seem to do a better job of cleaning. Don't thinkI would use anything but cotton for knitting them. Just isn't worth the extra money to use anything else. Also, can't imagine using worsted wool acrylic for my dishes or cleaning. The Microspun yarns maybe OK, but I think cotton probably hold up best.

WynnieG
03-10-2006, 01:35 PM
On the subject of knitting for the kitchen, I discovered last summer that not only does mason line knit into some trippy casual bags, it is kicka$$ for making potscrubbers...and coasters (though I crocheted the coasters).

You can get this stuff at your local hardware store... it comes in fluorescent colors like yellow and pink. Look for twisted mason line. Fiber content: nylon/polyester/polypropilene. One roll, 225ft of it cost me all of a buck.

I recommend highly that you do NOT use wooden needles for knitting with it though. The thread hasn't much give, which menas you will be kissing your bamboo goodbye. Stick with your plastic or metal needles. The line slides well off of these.

hedgewick
03-10-2006, 02:18 PM
Mason line is an interesting idea. what size needle did you use for it?

Holly
03-10-2006, 03:10 PM
My Aunt loves the knitted, cotton dishclothes for her face. She says that they work great for exfoliating! There is a site, dishcloth boutique, I think, that has tons of patterns for dishclothes.

AidanM
03-10-2006, 03:23 PM
The only thing I find odd about knit or crocheted washcloths is how they can be perfectly square until they get soaking wet and for some reason they're never quite square again until they've been washed and dried. It's probably just the weight of the water pulling it out of shape, but it still looks odd to me.

WynnieG
03-10-2006, 04:47 PM
Mason line is an interesting idea. what size needle did you use for it?

I believe I used an 11 US for the scrubbie. Anything over an 8 will work, though. The line has no give, but in terms of thickness it is equivalent to a light worsted.

quirky
03-10-2006, 05:06 PM
I love the idea for a bag made of mason line.
I work at Home Depot - I am constantly saying we should hold a charity fashion show. All of the fashions to be made with HD items only.
Think about it - wedding gowns of tyvex house wrap (its white and fairly fabric like), golf shoes made of astro turf - Im sure you get the idea :D

knitncook
03-10-2006, 05:52 PM
I've made washcloths from all kinds of various fibers. Natural and acrylic. I love them. I love washing my face with them. They really clean them well. Wouldn't trade my hand knit washcloths for anything. Lettuce soap from Burt's Bees and a washcloth have been my favorite facial!

kellyjo32
03-10-2006, 07:25 PM
I love making washcloths because you can practice stitches, and they work so much better!! My DH does most of the dishes, and he likes them as well. I like to make knobby ones, so they clean and scrub a little better. I also really like Peaches and Cream, instead of Suger and Cream, it's a lot softer and seems to hold it's shape better than the Sugar and Cream. I can only find it at Wal-Mart though, usually $1.20 or so a ball.

knitstress_tygher
03-22-2006, 02:33 PM
Peaches and Cream? I'm going to have to run to Wal*Mart and see if mine carries this. I've been using Sugar and Cream for mine thus far, but if I want to make face cloths rather than dishcloths, softer is always good.

kellyjo32
03-22-2006, 02:50 PM
You can also get it in cones at Wal-Mart for about $7 each. Which turns out to be a pretty good deal.

knitqueen
03-22-2006, 02:58 PM
I wonder how something like Patons Grace (http://www.patonsyarns.com/product.php?LGC=grace) would work for a face cloth. It is 100% mercerized cotton (no idea what the mercerized part means!) and I've seen it at Michael's, it is SO soft, much much softer than kitchen cottons.

Or I've also thought of Knitpicks 'Shine' for face cloths. Really really soft.

Ronda
03-22-2006, 05:09 PM
I just made my first dishcloth, and I just can't imagine washing up spaghetti sauce with it!! I don't know what I'm going to do with mine! I was thinking washcloths, but are they really that scratchy? What to do, what to do...

CarmenIbanez
03-22-2006, 05:42 PM
That is my fear! That I will make a dish or wash cloth and then be unable to use it for what it is!

knittnl
03-22-2006, 05:42 PM
I just made my first dishcloth, and I just can't imagine washing up spaghetti sauce with it!! I don't know what I'm going to do with mine! I was thinking washcloths, but are they really that scratchy? What to do, what to do...
I know what you mean! What about a potholder instead? It's less likey to get dirty.

I got some cotton from Knitpicks and it is very soft. Much softer than the Sugar and Cream is. I can't wait to see how it works as a dishcloth.

LeslieA
03-22-2006, 05:56 PM
Oh I am knitting washcloths too to practice my stitches. Although I haven't finished one yet. I keep ripping them apart. :blush: I guess I am trying to make them perfect and not just practice.

I also thought how could I use this for cleaning after all my hard work. ;)

Yes go to www.dishclothbotique.com and they have like 5 pages of all different patterns that you can use for the cloths. They also have a picture of each. I like to see what I'm knitting so that I can hope mine looks like the picture. ;) Good luck can't wait to see what you make.

HeatherFeather
03-22-2006, 06:15 PM
I'm one that likes to scrub my face. I don't feel like I've gotten it clean otherwise....prolly not all that great for the face....but I DO use a 10 stitch or so cotton cloth on my face. :)

LeslieA
03-22-2006, 06:18 PM
Oh I just wanted to add that I found out that the sugar and cream yarn which you can get at Micheaels you can also get at Joann. But it's like $1.27 at michaels and $2.19 at Joann. I couldn't believe it. Although I did buy a few rolls at joann because michaels didn't have these colors.
;)

nicolethegeek
03-22-2006, 07:26 PM
I wonder how something like Patons Grace (http://www.patonsyarns.com/product.php?LGC=grace) would work for a face cloth. It is 100% mercerized cotton (no idea what the mercerized part means!) and I've seen it at Michael's, it is SO soft, much much softer than kitchen cottons.
Patons Grace is a dream to knit or crochet with, but I wouldn't recommend it for washing up with. The mercerized part is a chemical process that the yarn goes through to remove "fuzz", which gives it its sheen. It does feel nice to feel up, but I find regular cotton yarn to be softer in a wet state.

Nikki
03-22-2006, 07:37 PM
mason line???? mason line??? Who would ever thunk it? Now I'll be saying, "sure honey, I'd love to ride along."

Nikki

hedgewick
03-22-2006, 07:37 PM
I'm glad I started this post! You have given me a great idea. I have a friend expecting a baby in September. I think I'll knit up a few washcloths for the baby so he or she has something nice to wash with in the tubby!

Doublereeder2
03-23-2006, 01:16 AM
I like to knit round ones (great short row practice!) and love the scrubby texture on my face and body. And they feel thick and luxurious.

Bye bye loofah, hello hand knit wash cloths!

Treeling
03-23-2006, 01:31 AM
I was at Whole Foods yesterday, and noticed they were selling some knitted tub things: a back scrubber, a mit, etc...

They were just stockinette, and they were made out of some kind of really rough fiber and I started thinking (after I looked at the price tags, ouch) that one could probably make them up using TWINE. Holy exfoliation, batman!

Has anyone tried knitting with twine? Have I lost my mind?

Rennagayle
03-23-2006, 02:08 AM
When my widowed mom remarried a couple years ago, I inherited all her kitchen towels/cloths, etc. when she movd into her new dh's home. There were several knitted cloths in there, which I assume had been given to her, as I didn't knit yet then, and she's not a knitter.

I LOVE using them. They're thicker, more absorbant, and do a better clean up job when wiping down the counters. They do get stained, but I just toss them in the washer with my bleach loads. Yes, the color has faded, but since they have no sentimental value to me, I don't worry about how they look; I just like how well they do the job.

I made my daughter-in-law a "kitchen basket" for Christmas. She loves to cook and spend time in the kitchen. In the basket, I included a Rachel Ray cookbook, a couple of flour sack dishtowels, a pair of Chicago Cutlery kitchen shears, a bag of candy, and 5 handknitted (by me) kitchen dishcloths in yellow and blue, both variegated and solids, to match her kitchen. :D

Shandeh
03-23-2006, 08:02 AM
I noticed somewhere else in this forum that someone made dishcloths with Red Heart acrylic yarn. They said that the cloth was EXCELLENT for scrubbing dishes - better than cotton.

origami
03-27-2006, 12:22 AM
I feel silly asking this but I'll go ahead. I see a lot of you making knit washcloths. I have never seen or used one before but it seems like a good way to practice stitches and such. My question is how do knit washcloths compare with the regular cloth ones you get in the store? Do they clean any better or worse? What about for your face? Very abrasive? Just curious. Thanks!

Knitting dishcloths is a FABULOUS way to practice stitches without committing yourself to a huge project. I have limited knitting time but I really want to make sure that the time I spend knitting is making me a better knitter so when I eventually do have time, I won't have to catch up on learning everything. I love just paging through my stitch dictionaries and finding interesting stitches and swatching them up.

Some cotton yarns are softer than others. The Wal-mart brand of 100 percent cotton is definitely softer than Lion Cotton or Lily. It's by Elmore Pisgah. Some people like to use Cotton Tots which is very, very soft. Or a cotton/acrylic blend.

knitstress_tygher
03-27-2006, 01:18 AM
Sadly, the Wal*Mart brand comes in all of 5 colors, at least at my store. I'll stick with Sugar & Cream or CottonTots.

Mienna
03-27-2006, 09:54 AM
In one of my pattern books (I can't remember which one) it says to use acrylic because it dries very fast. I've only used cotton ('cause I love cotton and the little balls of it it in my bag easily :p) and I do like them a lot.

Holly