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View Full Version : another country heard from so to speak


nonny2t
10-02-2006, 08:48 AM
Though I have knitted since I was 13, I am not very advanced, mostly because I am chicken. I didn't knit for years then would do baby booties etc for a shower than not knit for years etc. Now I am back to knitting in the fall and spring when the weather is colder since we live in a warm climate where it is "sticky" to knit in the summer. Anyway, another question for those of you in the know. Should I follow the continental knitting videos or instructions since I knit left handed? I am one of those left bodied people whose right hand God just included in the package when he made me, but is little if any use.... :roflhard: I joined 4H when I was in JR HIGH and a dear sweet lady took pity on me when no one else would and taught me how to knit left handed. I hold the "empty" needle in my left hand, wind the yarn on my left hand and knit the stitches from the "right" needle onto the "left." I looked at the video instructions and it seems like I "continental" knit, but I am not sure that those instructions are always correct for me. Should I always follow continental instructions? Thanks again for the help!

kemp
10-02-2006, 08:52 AM
The description you gave does sound like continental. I don't see any reason you couldn't always use those instructions???

janelanespaintbrush
10-02-2006, 08:56 AM
I hold the "empty" needle in my left hand, wind the yarn on my left hand and knit the stitches from the "right" needle onto the "left."

Maybe I just haven't had enough coffee yet this morning, but for continental, shouldn't the stitches be knit from the left needle onto the right?

nonny2t
10-02-2006, 09:14 AM
Jane: See, this is why I am confused. I thought that too so I thought the continental way wouldn't work either that the only way I can figure out instructions is to take english right handed knitting and try and reverse the instructions, which let me tell you, for me, can be difficult. It took me forever to learn how to make one using the video and reversing what she was saying.

Anyway, I look forward to more comments on this to figure out what to do.

Donna

kemp
10-02-2006, 09:22 AM
:teehee: you've had enough coffee...I just misread what she wrote. Maybe that is the part that is different from continental making it "left handed?"

nonny2t
10-02-2006, 10:19 AM
So basically, I am screwed and still have to reverse everything in my head! :roflhard: Thanks for the info!

Donna

janelanespaintbrush
10-02-2006, 10:54 AM
So basically, I am screwed and still have to reverse everything in my head! :roflhard: Thanks for the info!

Donna

Well, instead of re-learning how to do it the way you used to, maybe you could just start fresh? I don't think you would have trouble with continental as a leftie.

Old Knitter
10-02-2006, 10:56 AM
Isn't knitting interesting? Stretches our brains just a tad......I had to read the posts twice and still couldn't get a picture. I don't drink coffee, so I'd better get some tea and try again.

Knitting-teacher
10-02-2006, 03:40 PM
Well, instead of re-learning how to do it the way you used to, maybe you could just start fresh? I don't think you would have trouble with continental as a leftie.

As somebody who is learning to knit continental after knitting Engish all my life I say go for it and learn. :thumbsup:

Pink Dandelion
10-02-2006, 06:29 PM
Left Handed continental knitter here!

Ok, so here's what I do: my empty needle (the working needle) is in my left hand and works the stitches off of the gradually emptying needle in my right hand.

This is the same for all left-handers knitting true left handed, whether you knit continental or English.

In continental, the yarn is attached to the left needle and held over in your right hand (this should cross it behind or in front of your right needle depending on if your purling or knitting), my yarn rests over my index finger and then down through my ring and pinky finger to help with the tension.

In English you would hold your yarn in your left hand (the same hand you hold your working needle), and using either lever English - the index finger to manipulates the yarn around the needle, or throw (standard) English - where you use your whole left hand to bring the yarn around your needle.

When you're watching instructional videos, always try to think in mirror image - left becomes right and right becomes left.