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View Full Version : I think I have to rip yesterday's work - sigh


MrTea
11-19-2006, 04:59 PM
I'm making my first sock ever. It's from the free toe-up sock pattern on this site.

The pattern says to start ribbing immediately after the heel is complete. I think this is incorrect as it seems to be bunching real bad right around the ball of the ankle. (see photo)

I think I have to rip it out and start over :verysad: :frog:

I tried it on with a shoe and it didn't seem to get in the way, but I just think it looks terrible. I shouldn't have started the ribbing so soon. I was cocky and didn't bother to try it on until it was almost done. I basically wasted my whole weekend. :doh: Time to start drinking I guess.

Also, I'm having trouble with some of the yarn ends trying to back out. I used the double knit-in join method. Anyone have any suggestions?

Sara
11-19-2006, 05:15 PM
First, let me congratulate you on a great looking sock!

I think the heel gusset should come up higher than it does on your foot. Can you frog back to that point and lengthen it?

For weaving in, I follow these instructions from Knitty.com:

http://knitty.com/ISSUEfall04/FEATfall04TT.html

Good luck!

MrTea
11-19-2006, 05:23 PM
I think the heel gusset should come up higher than it does on your foot. Can you frog back to that point and lengthen it?

That's the plan, but that was basically a days work I'll be ripping out. I learned a lesson and I suppose that's worth a days work.

Dang!

skNYC
11-19-2006, 05:43 PM
Yeah. Looks like the heel should be higher.

blueeyes28
11-19-2006, 05:47 PM
I here ya! I just learned the provisional cast on for a hat I want to make I have cast on 160 stitches and pulled them back off about 12 times and now that I am finally off and running on my hat I realized I need to get different yarn for this project :grrr: I have put it away for now!

CreativeCreature
11-19-2006, 07:15 PM
I can see what you mean about it bunching up, it does look off. I hope you can fix it without too much trouble.

Awesome job though on your first sock though. The colors look great together. I've just started my first sock this evening and I've got row ONE done. :teehee: I can't wait to get it done.

Sorry I can't offer any suggestions to help ya, just moral support when you screw up!! :roflhard:

Stiney
11-19-2006, 08:07 PM
Mr Tea, I am totally feeling your pain right now. I just finished the first of my Knucks, bound off, and the wrist part is way too big for my skinny little wrists. I was trying it on and it was too big, but I was all, "Oh, the ribbing will pull in once I've bound off." :pout:

Now I have to frog the bind-off, then figure out how many decreases I need to make.

Braden
11-19-2006, 09:02 PM
I don't knit socks, but it looks okay to me.

janelanespaintbrush
11-19-2006, 09:35 PM
Hey MrTea. Congrats on your first socks! :yay: I was so eager to finish mine that I decided to stop at anklets because I couldn't wait to wear them -- the intention was full-fledged socks, but well, I was impatient so I bound off as soon as I was reasonably able to. Of course, when I put them on, they were too tight (too much negative ease!) but I wore them that night to bed regardless.

Anyway. That's a short row heel, right? Some people suggest using 60% of the foot stitches for the heel if 50% is not enough -- you could try that next time if it feels too small. As it is, I'd probably just frog the ribbing and put in a few rows of stockinette before starting the ribbing again. A lot of patterns suggest doing that anyway.

Also, it's hard to tell from the picture, but did you do the ribbing on smaller needles? I made some socks where I used the same size needles for the ribbing, and it turned out really baggy around the ankles -- kinda like "slouch socks" -- remember those?

All in all, not too shabby, MrTea. I think you think it looks a lot worse than it really does. I'd probably just wear them and move on to the next pair!

P.S. Did you use the "jogless jog" on your stripes?

cheesiesmom
11-20-2006, 12:52 PM
Very nice. I've only done top down socks. I don't have the nerve to try it the other way. My rib sock pattern says to knit a couple rounds of stockinette before starting the heel flap which in your case would be after the heel is completed.

I know frogging is a pain, but it is also a learning experience. (So much for trying to make you feel better at the prospect of ripping.) You might try knitting the second sock adding the suggestions every one has given, see how that sock fits and if you feel it's worth it at that point rip the first sock and redo. If you can live with two slightly different socks, so be it. The nex time you will have more experience to go on.

Old Knitter
11-20-2006, 01:06 PM
Sorry you have to go backwards....do you know about using a lifeline when you rip out? I hope I've caught you in time....basically you thread a yarn needle with contrasting yarn, I prefer using cotton. Then you start running it through a row of stitches just below where you need to rip out. The best way to describe how to run this yarn would be to tell you to pick up the first leg of each stich all the way around the sock. Now when you rip out your work you will have a safety row that stops you from going too far or dropping any stitches.

I know I don't explain things well...so you might want to knit up a scrap swatch and pactice this technique. It will become invaluable to you someday to be able to do this.

brownishcoat
11-20-2006, 01:10 PM
You described it really well. I was going to recommend the same thing. :thumbsup:

MrTea
11-20-2006, 01:10 PM
Very nice. I've only done top down socks. I don't have the nerve to try it the other way.

It's not as difficult as you may have heard. Don't let anyone scare you. It's tricky to get the figure-8 cast on down, but I had it in about 3 tries. Just keep trying, you'll get it.

MrTea
11-20-2006, 01:12 PM
Sorry you have to go backwards....do you know about using a lifeline when you rip out? I hope I've caught you in time....basically you thread a yarn needle with contrasting yarn, I prefer using cotton. Then you start running it through a row of stitches just below where you need to rip out. The best way to describe how to run this yarn would be to tell you to pick up the first leg of each stich all the way around the sock. Now when you rip out your work you will have a safety row that stops you from going too far or dropping any stitches.

I know I don't explain things well...so you might want to knit up a scrap swatch and pactice this technique. It will become invaluable to you someday to be able to do this.

I have used needles before, to do what you are suggesting, but never a needle and yarn. Thanks for the tip, that should work nicely.

newamy
11-20-2006, 01:13 PM
I'm a beginning sock knitter myself. I'm on my 3rd pair of cuff down. I've not done any toe up socks yet, but I agree that heel looks too short and maybe you should knit the length of the foot a bit further before making the turn. I have noticed with socks that in measuring foot length and the length of the actual work is tricky because the sock widens out when stretched over the foot.

The sock does look nice though as does your knitting, so keep plugging away. I like the contrast toe and heel.

Amy

Jan in CA
11-20-2006, 01:23 PM
Oh boy..I feel your pain, too. :pout: I'm about 10 inches into my 35 cable afghan now and so far so good, but when I started I had to rip out 220 stitches TWICE with about 2 in worth of work on it. :doh:

You are right though, the learning is worth it. You won't make the same mistake again. I gotta say though it looks great!!

janelanespaintbrush
11-20-2006, 01:24 PM
Re: making a lifeline -- you don't have to use needle and thread for what you're planning to do. Just use the needles you're knitting with. (I think maybe that's what you were saying you had done before in your response but I wasn't sure.) Amy has a video on this page (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/basic_techniques/misc.php) showing how to insert a needle into destination row, before unraveling. A lifeline made with needle and thread is handy for making a holding place just in case you have to rip later. Since you're not doing anything too fancy like lace, it's probably not necessary, though you can if you want to.

MrTea
11-20-2006, 01:47 PM
Re: making a lifeline -- you don't have to use needle and thread for what you're planning to do. Just use the needles you're knitting with. (I think maybe that's what you were saying you had done before in your response but I wasn't sure.) Amy has a video on this page (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/basic_techniques/misc.php) showing how to insert a needle into destination row, before unraveling. A lifeline made with needle and thread is handy for making a holding place just in case you have to rip later. Since you're not doing anything too fancy like lace, it's probably not necessary, though you can if you want to.

Trust me, I'm all too familiar with this technique. :frog:

I've frogged so many things, I think I might be part french now. ooh la-la. Maybe I should knit myself a beret.

Just never tried it with a needle and thread before.

cookworm
11-20-2006, 05:37 PM
Your socks look great!!! I'm too chicken to try socks, but I'd like to one day to say that I did it, you know? Sorry you had to frog your work--you were in good company. I had to frog a hat I was working on a few times myself...must be something in the water! :teehee:

cheesiesmom
11-20-2006, 10:04 PM
It's not as difficult as you may have heard. Don't let anyone scare you. It's tricky to get the figure-8 cast on down, but I had it in about 3 tries. Just keep trying, you'll get it.


I guess I'm not really scare, but complacent comes to mind. It's so easy to just keep doing it the same way that you're sure of and are happy with the results. It's like going off into magic loop or 2 circs. I love my dpns why should I explore further? (However, that short row heel is scary.) I'm also on the Yahoo sockknitters group and there is lots o' converations about short row heels. Some day, soon!!

But even if I never do try toe up or magic loop, I LOVE knitting socks!!

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