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madametj
12-28-2006, 05:32 PM
I'm not a guy knitter, but I am curious to know how many we have here on the forum.

If you are a guy knitter please post how long u have been knitting here and why you took up the hobby.

Braden
12-28-2006, 05:39 PM
I do. Like when I have to wait in my doctor's office or something.

simplethings
12-28-2006, 05:54 PM
I'm a guy knitter. :hug:

In public so far I've knitted on a plane (and the airport), while waiting for my brake pads to be replaced, and in a few bookstores.

I've been knitting now for just over a year. I learned at work through my boss. We were having a discussion that somehow went to knitting. I mentioned that I had always been interested and she said that she knew how. The next day she came in with a new pair of needles and a ball of yarn for me and taught me how to knit, purl, cast on and bind off.

I attempted to knit a few scarves. My first project was really experimental. I was just practicing stitches and creating small chunks of garter and stockinette. The next scarf I attempted was fast but too short to be used(I had only purchased one ball of the yarn). My third scarf was ribbed, after about a foot I made a mistake. I didn't learn how to fix a mistake, or rip back a few rows and re-insert my needle so I quit.

About nine months later in October I took a random trip to Michael's, bought yarn, and started knitting again. I'm finally able to repair any mistakes now thanks to knittinghelp.com and I can't stop knitting or buying yarn.
:happydance:

knit-errant
12-28-2006, 07:15 PM
The first knitter I saw knitting in public was a man. He worked at the college I went to, and was in his mid-20s at the time. It seems like he always had knitting nearby.

He knitted and crocheted, but it seems like he knitted more often. He was always working on some intricate, beautiful thing -- lots of cables, colorwork, or lace -- and it was never smaller than a sweater. I remember him making a red crochet evening gown with thin satin ribbon once, too.

ecb
12-28-2006, 11:45 PM
the VERY BEST knitter i know is a man
he does these amaizing intrasia things with varigated yarn, these irregular edges to his intrasia, swirlie, look so NEAT when he uses the varigated yarns
you see the lines to the color changes, but they are not as they would be if knitted straight

and he does these HUGE sweaters with smaller gage yarn and double knit with patterns of color and texture
he is SO COOL

in about a million years I will be good nough to work at his spinnery
did I mention he spins his own yarn using wind power?

and he is nice, and helpful, and smart, and can Sing too!!!

he is definitely someone to look up to knitting wise
he was knitting at the solstice celibration he was singing at
it was good to see

ecb

madametj
12-28-2006, 11:49 PM
did I mention he spins his own yarn using wind power?


:noway: you know SUPERMAN?!

:teehee:

landolphe
12-29-2006, 12:32 AM
Hi-

I'm a guy, and I knit . . . and in public too! I've been knitting since 1982. I also spin and (in the past) bred llama and alpaca color stock for wool, which I sold to handknitters and other fiber artists in USA and South America.

I have knit on airplanes for about 950,000 air miles and just about anywhere else I go. Can't think of any place where I wouldn't knit, unless all knitting were prohibited.

Cheer,

Landolphe

brendajos
12-29-2006, 01:17 AM
*gasp*

wanna know how much of a fit i will throw about the concealed carry law that is going to go into effect on Monday if THIS ever happens?


unless all knitting were prohibited.


:tap:

landolphe
12-29-2006, 04:51 PM
I have been in (only) two Federal Courtrooms where knitting was not allowed, cuz of needles. Also is not permitted in a number of federal and state level prison visiting rooms for same reason.

Moral: don't go to Federal Court or prison!

Landolphe

nonny2t
12-29-2006, 05:02 PM
I am positively in awe of men who knit. I have never actually seen a man who knits. It gives my husband the shivers. He tells me he "doesn't understand it." The man is 40 times smarter than I am and he doesn't understand knitting! :rofl:

Ok, for you men out there that DO knit in public, what are strangers reactions to it?

aylaanne
12-29-2006, 05:11 PM
There's a guy in my knitting group that meets in a public place, and he has no trouble knitting there. He says it's the only time he knits because he always feels too busy to knit anywhere else.

wooly_guy
12-30-2006, 12:05 AM
I'm a guy and I knit. I've been at it for close to 30 yrs; on and off. I can't recall knitting in public, but I would not hesitate to do it if it was convenient.

AnotherBecca
12-30-2006, 12:46 AM
My husband knits on occasion... usually in our house, but I don't think he'd mind knitting elsewhere as well. Well, there was one night when he was making fun of a guy friend of ours for watching "Dancing with the Stars" so I threw in a timely "oh, have you finished knitting that pink hat you've been working on?" but he recovered well :teehee:

Braden
12-30-2006, 12:53 AM
Ok, for you men out there that DO knit in public, what are strangers reactions to it?

I get a lot of weird looks, like guys shouldn't knit, but most people stop and ask what I'm working on, and comment on it, etc.

landolphe
12-30-2006, 12:57 AM
I am positively in awe of men who knit. I have never actually seen a man who knits. It gives my husband the shivers. He tells me he "doesn't understand it." The man is 40 times smarter than I am and he doesn't understand knitting!

Hmm, I recall having watched (with interest) my mother and grandmother knitting back when, but for whatever reason it did not capture my imagination at that time. Later,the woman in my life used to knit (English style), and I can recall my having not grasped it intuitively. But, for several reasons, I wanted to learn.

In 1982, while skiing in Vermont, I wandered into a knitting shop owned by an elderly Austrian woman, where I watched her knitting Continental style. All at once, the penny fell; all was immediately clear; I got it on the spot. She set me up with a #9 circular needle, a coupla colors of wool yarn, and handwritten instructions for making a two color, horizontal striped wall hanging. I returned to the lodge, planted myself in front of the fire, and dug in. A few hours and several glasses of wine later, I had a wall hanging. I was AMAZED that I had actually done it, had created "something" out of "nothing." Went out in the snow, tromped around the woods, found a suitable stick, and mounted my prize wall hanging.

Next morning at 0-dark-thirty I was back at the knitting shop. She wrote out a pattern for a ski hat; outfitted me with my very own 16" US 9 circular needle (which I still have) and assorted wool yarns (" ... always knit only with wool") and three books by Elizabeth Zimmermann; made me swear on her grandmother's knitted washrag that I would never ever knit the "American" way, would always avoid straight needles, knit EVERYTHING on circular needles; and would celebrate Elizabeth Zimmermann's birthday forever. That was it. I was hooked (bad crochet metaphor).

Landolphe

AnotherBecca
12-30-2006, 02:38 AM
:D I loved your story, Landolphe!

PurpleMittens
12-30-2006, 07:13 AM
I am a guy who knits in public.

I have been knitting for a couple months at most, and that includes about four weeks of me scowling at a skein of yarn and crumpled attempt at a scarf~ I got started mainly on a lark, though I imagine it probably originated from a general desire to create something tangible in my life. Studying in the liberal arts tends to confine one to a lot of abstract thought that doesn't result in very much stuff that you can hold out and say "see, I did this!." I think I started brewing beer for much the same reason.

Peoples' reactions tend to be somewhat mixed. When I knit in public it is generally at work, and most of the women customers who see it tend to think it is neat. My female co-workers think it is cute, and I have actually taught two of them how to knit (albeit to the limited extent that I am able to teach someone to knit.) My male co-workers initially reacted in a fairly typical "that's not very masculine" sort of way, but didn't really make much of a chronic point of it. They certainly could have been worse. I have played the flute for many years though, so I got over the impulse to react defensively when people attempt to belittle me for pursuing "feminine" endeavors a long time ago (although I still fail to understand what is so inherently "female" about the flute, but that's a different issue. I will, however, say that sitting in the flute section in high school certainly beat sitting next to the greasy pimply trombone players.) I imagine the lack of a "rise" played some role in the limited extent of their amusement, although in all fairness I should say that I don't really work with mean-spirited people in the first place.

I also plan on participating in the "Feminist Knitting Circle" on campus this semester, which I think meets in the library. I really doubt there would be much of any reaction from passerby in that setting though.

nonny2t
12-30-2006, 08:53 AM
Men, do you think it is more difficult for you than women to do the physical knitting because your hands are bigger? There are lots of things I can see that would cause men more consternation than women about knitting and it isn't just the stigma attached. I can see picking colors for things, deciding on patterns, etc not as much fun for men than us women, but I may be way off the mark.

All I can say, is WTG male knitters! :muah:

As for my husband, he can sit for hours and play Risk (gag) or those Soduku puzzles that just plain give me a headache, :hair: but knitting stumps him for some reason. Not that he couldn't do it, I just think he stands outside the box and wonders, why? when you can buy the stuff! In his defense though, I have to say he very much liked my Beatles sweater that I made my grandson.

Faye

Jan in CA
12-30-2006, 01:49 PM
Maybe because it's a bit more unusual, but I'm finding these stories of men knitting fascinating! :cheering:

My daughter's boyfriend ask me if I'd teach him to knit. I was pleasantly surprised by this because even though he'd said his grandma knit and she'd attempted to teach him when he was very little he is now a lover of hockey, drag racing, big trucks, and all things stereotypically "male". Nice to know he is comfortable enough to ask about knitting and I told my daughter so. :)

auburnchick
12-30-2006, 02:02 PM
My son (pre-teen) has always been fascinated by my needlework. I've always cross-stitched, and one day he asked me to teach him. So I did, and he's not too bad at it.

He's been watching me learn to knit and is very supportive (unlike teenage daughter who makes fun of me). If he ever asks me to teach him, I certainly will!

Knitting_Guy
12-30-2006, 02:46 PM
At age 45 I just started knitting a couple of days ago. So far the only more or less public knitting that I have done is sitting outside on my stoop so I could enjoy some nice, warm fresh air while knitting.

One of my neighbors was walking by and stopped to chat with me about it as she has been knitting for 50 years or so. She thought it was "quite nice" to see a man knitting. Of course she did frown a bit at the bottle of beer sitting next to me LOL

I took up knitting because as a trucker I wanted a hobby that was highly portable and that I could do both sitting in my truck or sitting in a truckstop.

I imagine I will be doing quite a bit of knitting in truckstops while out on the road. Despite the fact that my truck is basically an apartment on wheels, it's nice to get out of it and go sit in a different environment around other people.

I'm not too concerned about what my fellow truckers might think although I expect to get a bit of ribbing here and there. I'm very comfortable with myself and am not lacking in confidence so I can take a bit of ribbing.

Besides, I know another trucker who knits and he says it's a great way to meet women. LOL

Jan in CA
12-30-2006, 03:46 PM
Besides, I know another trucker who knits and he says it's a great way to meet women. LOL

:teehee: I bet it is!

wooly_guy
12-30-2006, 04:23 PM
re: nonny:

I can say that I have an easy time picking out colors and maybe even an easier time with patterns ( designing & sizing) than most women that I know that knit. This probably comes from an earlier career in the clothing biz. Further, I have just as much dexterity as most of the women I know that knit; now I don't have big hands, but bigger than the average woman. I was once in a knit store while they had a knitting contest; for speed. I observed the leader showing off their skill, and soon realized I was at least twice as fast, and more important, more accurate.
In choosing colors, there will always be a difference in male vs. female. This is why I can say I never met a succesful female merchandiser for conservative men's clothing while I was in that biz; and I wished there was.
I once picked up a book in a library or book store, dealing with the history of hand knitting. It said that men were the dominate force in the earliest days of this craft and there were contests which the men would'show off' their skill. I wished I had noted the title/author or had purchased it now.

Braden
12-31-2006, 05:54 PM
re: nonny:I can say that I have an easy time picking out colors and maybe even an easier time with patterns ( designing & sizing) than most women that I know that knit[...] Further, I have just as much dexterity as most of the women I know that knit; now I don't have big hands, but bigger than the average woman...

Yeah, me too. I really like designing aran sweaters and knitting fair isle sweaters (I like arans more), and I'd consider myself an experienced/advanced knitter.

nonny2t
12-31-2006, 06:50 PM
That is wonderful fellows! It is so stupid that we have to have dumb stereotypes with even hobbies. I have to say though, take for example, woodworking. Women are much more accepted doing woodworking than men doing needlecrafts. It is so stupid!

How could a man not be attractive to a women if he knits. She thinks he has found his softer side! :roflhard: I think Jack would hate it because he would find it boring and doesn't have the patience. It DOES take patience as I find out every time I have my yarn snarled or have to frog something.

You fellows, keep on knitting and I know the ladies here would love to see some of your beautiful work on here so be sure and post it!

Faye

Rorshach
12-31-2006, 09:59 PM
Well being a male knitter, I would say that knitting in public was never really difficult for me, primarily because of the fact that when I'm knitting I tend to ignore everything around me. As far as being difficult for me to knit because my hands are alledgedly bigger, that isn't the case, I have an aesthetic's hands, long and thin.

The most interesting reactions I've got were from people staring at me, whilst I knit. kind of odd to have 50 pairs of eyes watching you do something. Though the main reason I took it up was to try to quit smoking, but alas here I am 2 years later still smoking and knitting.

Knitting_Guy
12-31-2006, 10:19 PM
I have pretty big hands but don't find that it's a problem knitting.

landolphe
01-01-2007, 01:15 PM
I recall having received only one "negative" comment over the years:

While knitting in London's Heathrow Airport, two little English boys (brothers, ages 5 & 7) came over to me, gaping and giggling, and said,

-What are you doing?
-I'm knitting
-We knnnnowww that, silly man! But yooouuu can't do that.
-Oh, why not?
-Cuz, only girls can knit ... Everyone knows that.
-Well, how do you know I'm not a girl?

Nursing a bad case of cognitive overload, they shreiked and scampered back to their mother, who, as I recall. was not knitting.


Landolphe

cheesiesmom
01-01-2007, 11:16 PM
I've had the impression that knitting used to be a more masculine occupation that it is nowadays. The necessity of knitting socks, vests (unders), etc.

I think that men tend to be better at such endeavors as knitting, crocheting, and such other fiber/needlework. Perhaps it's a matter of men being encouraged to be artistic.

I taught my husband to knit years ago and he did beautiful work. But he complained that knitting made him nervous sort of like jigsaw puzzles unnerve him, too. Frankly, I don't want to be around any male knitters. They're probably a lot better than I am. It's tough being so inept. :notworthy:

kri
01-01-2007, 11:38 PM
I think that men tend to be better at such endeavors as knitting, crocheting, and such other fiber/needlework. Perhaps it's a matter of men being encouraged to be artistic.

Honestly, I don't think one could say that men or women are better at knitting or crafts.

Rorshach
01-02-2007, 04:44 AM
I would agree, it's really a toss up of which gender is better, women tend to be more informed, though, men tend toward the more technical stuff. As to who's better? I say who cares really, it's what you get in the end, now how you got there.

joe_doufu
01-02-2007, 12:02 PM
I've only been knitting since last winter. That winter, I knit on a plane, a boat, and on a bullet train. This year I haven't knit in "public" but have allowed fellow residents of the teachers' dorm to catch glimpses of me knitting in the common room, but not for such periods of time that they started asking questions. Funny that I'm not uncomfortable to be knitting but some of the other guys are obviously uncomfortable to comment about it!

Knitting for me has become a way of "meditation"... forcing myself to slow down and put the stress on a back burner for an hour or two at a time. I second the motion that it's a great way to meet/impress girls. How could they not be surprised by a gift of a hand-knit hat or scarf?

madametj
01-02-2007, 02:13 PM
so far about 10 guys knitters have voted. honestly, i'm a little dissapointed--i thought there would be more than that :( (though u have to admit, the gr8 stories kinda make up for it :cheering: )

comeon guys, i know ur out there. where are u hiding? :hiding:

kevyoga1970
01-02-2007, 04:35 PM
I am a guy knitter in Memphis, TN, and I knit everywhere. My favorite place to knit is my local coffee shop. No one has ever given me any grief. As a matter of fact, I've met some nice people who were interested in what I was doing.

JoeE
01-02-2007, 11:10 PM
I haven't been knitting long enough to have had an opportunity to knit in public. I suspect that anyone who knows me well would not be at all surprised to see me knitting. We used to have a quilting group at work, and I was quite active (and pretty good at it IMNSHO). I'd be worried to do it at church right now, because I'd be embarrassed for people to hear my language when something unpleasant happens.

I admit that I'd probably feel weird knitting in front of strangers, say at a tractor pull or other testosterone heavy event. Chalk it up to being called a sissy one too many times as a kid. On the other hand, I'd be very comfortable doing any kind of needlework in a group of other people who were participating. It's kind of fun to get attention from people who think it's cool to see a guy doing what they consider "women's work".

Joe

msoebel
01-03-2007, 12:57 PM
Well, I don't know if he has been knitting in public yet (as he lives in Washington Dc and I am up in Michigan) but I taught my brother in law to knit over Thanksgiving weekend.

It was interesting...he has what we have affectionately called "puppy paws" - hands that look to be about 3 sizes to big for his 5'8" body. But he figured out how to maneuver size 8 bamboo needles eventually!

Wonder what the other construction workers will think? :teehee:

Misty

brendajos
01-03-2007, 01:12 PM
Well, I don't know if he has been knitting in public yet (as he lives in Washington Dc and I am up in Michigan) but I taught my brother in law to knit over Thanksgiving weekend.

It was interesting...he has what we have affectionately called "puppy paws" - hands that look to be about 3 sizes to big for his 5'8" body. But he figured out how to maneuver size 8 bamboo needles eventually!

Wonder what the other construction workers will think? :teehee:

Misty


Okay I just pictured a row of them sitting and eating their lunches (ya know like they show in commercials and stuff) and him sitting there with his knitting! That is a delightful picture to me. It is especially delightful imagining them not at all gawking at him!

Jan in CA
01-03-2007, 01:14 PM
Okay I just pictured a row of them sitting and eating their lunches (ya know like they show in commercials and stuff) and him sitting there with his knitting! That is a delightful picture to me. It is especially delightful imagining them not at all gawking at him!

Or how about them sitting up on a steel beam of a high rise knitting instead of eating. :teehee:

brendajos
01-03-2007, 01:19 PM
heeeeeeeee! I love it!

Braden
01-04-2007, 12:12 AM
That is wonderful fellows! It is so stupid that we have to have dumb stereotypes with even hobbies. I have to say though, take for example, woodworking. Women are much more accepted doing woodworking than men doing needlecrafts. It is so stupid!

Exactly! I think people should just do what they like doing, no matter what people think. Knitting is just something that more women do than men, it's not JUST for women.

Knitting_Guy
01-04-2007, 12:38 AM
That is wonderful fellows! It is so stupid that we have to have dumb stereotypes with even hobbies. I have to say though, take for example, woodworking. Women are much more accepted doing woodworking than men doing needlecrafts. It is so stupid!

Exactly! I think people should just do what they like doing, no matter what people think. Knitting is just something that more women do than men, it's not JUST for women.

Yeah, but that's the crux of the biscuit isn't it? There are all of these guys out here that imagine themselves to be so rough and tough but at their core they're scared to death of being thought of as less than that.

Wimps.

I do what I want to do and couldn't care less what anyone else thinks.

madametj
01-04-2007, 07:52 PM
i just bought a book, and my friend were fascinated to see that a pic of guys knitting on the cover. they were all fighting over to get a closer look. :teehee:

Joel
01-04-2007, 08:01 PM
I'm a guy.

Yes, I knit in public and it has actually led to some very cool conversations when women see a guy that does knitting in public. Most guys don't say much but the women are usually fascinated with what I'm doing and I will tell them I learned on here. Then sometimes I give them a brief instruction/demo.

So that's my 2 cents.

Joel
01-04-2007, 08:04 PM
check this out...


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2jYa_rJyG18

there are days when I could totally be that dude screaming at the tv about football and knitting at the same time. lol

five_six
01-04-2007, 08:09 PM
that is waayyy cool... thanks for that :hug:

madametj
01-04-2007, 08:15 PM
oooooh! cool video!! thanx

DianaM
01-05-2007, 01:45 AM
One of my male teachers in Colorado is a knitter (and crocheter, and spinner and lace maker and cook, etc, the man has no limits!!).

He used to carry this huge laptop case/briefcase with all his papers to grade, class material, etc and would from time to time produce a bag with a half finished sock in it.

He would sit at the cafeteria and work on his socks. He'd also knit every single sweater he owned.

In conversation he once told me that he grew up in a farm in the South and his mom taught him to do all sort of needlecraft, pointing out that he was shocked to find out at the age of 12 that you could actually buy socks at the store instead of having to make them all yourself.


My bf has never been interested in knitting, but gives me yarn as presents and loves what I make. He mentioned once that he'd take up knitting just so he could make things out of wool for himself (I'm allergic to it). So there's hope of me brining him over to the Dark Side :teehee:

imported_Knitty_Kat
01-06-2007, 06:19 PM
Dude knitters rock in a big way! Major kudos to our male counterparts out there who aren't ashamed to KIP! :muah:

Jeremy
01-06-2007, 11:04 PM
I knit in public all the time-most often on airplanes and in airports where its great to pass the time. I learned about a year and a half ago. My good friend was diagnosed with colon cancer then and was awaiting surgery. To take her mind off it my wife and I took her around to various knit shops to pass the time as she was a long time knitter as was her mom. To overcome the boredom, I asked her to teach me to knit. I eventually learned some from her and a lot more from this site. My wife took up knitting at the same time but has never progressed beyond scarves. I have knit socks, shawls, pocketbooks and ponchos among other things. Very few days pass without me knitting some.

JoeE
01-07-2007, 09:51 AM
I did it! I knit in public. Kinda. I went to a game night at a friend's apartment last night, and I took my knitting with me. I got a good start on my first sock. Several people noticed that I "help" my stitches along by contorting my face into gruesome, pained looks. I assured them that once I had more than one row on DPNs that it wouldn't be quite as much of a challenge.

One of my friends (female) said that if she'd known I was bringing my knitting she'd have brought hers too and we could have had a mini knitting bee. Kind of funny, she was impressed that I could K and P. She hasn't learned to P yet. That was kind of cool--only a few months into this myself, and I'm an expert to someone else.

Joe

Knitting_Guy
01-07-2007, 11:56 AM
I was sitting in a booth in a truckstop knitting on my scarf a couple of nights ago. I had three different women come over and comment on my knitting. Two of them also knit and the third said that she had always wanted to learn.

five_six
01-07-2007, 08:42 PM
Now Mason - did you get women coming up to in truckstop booths before? Seems to me your knitting is already working for you :teehee:

Knitting_Guy
01-07-2007, 09:00 PM
LOL rarely.

Joel
01-08-2007, 01:25 AM
Now Mason - did you get women coming up to in truckstop booths before? Seems to me your knitting is already working for you :teehee:

It's an interesting (and seemingly good) way for single guys to meet women. As for those of us who are married... well its good conversation starter and personally I'm always open to making new friends.

:)

brendajos
01-08-2007, 01:30 AM
JOEL!!!!! I was wondering when we would see you on here! Now we gotta hunt down Dave, Glenn, and Trucker! (I am pretty sure there are others that aren't popping into my head right now but they need to get on in here! MrTea has posted on this thread hasn't he? :?? )

Hope you are doing well Joel and had wonderful holidays.

imported_Knitty_Kat
01-08-2007, 01:59 AM
Sometimes I wish my husband would show interest in knitting. I actually made him try crocheting once and he said it was hard so I didn't force the issue any more. Of course, him not knitting sometimes works to my advantage. While he's playing video games with my brother, I'm able to knit in peace. :teehee:

Joel
01-08-2007, 02:18 PM
JOEL!!!!! I was wondering when we would see you on here! Now we gotta hunt down Dave, Glenn, and Trucker! (I am pretty sure there are others that aren't popping into my head right now but they need to get on in here! MrTea has posted on this thread hasn't he? :?? )

Hope you are doing well Joel and had wonderful holidays.

Yep... I'm still here although I had a little while there at the end of the year where I didnt login :verysad:

Did you have a good holiday season?


Knitty_Kat,

I have trouble doing crochet too. Lots harder than knitting. 7 basic stitches vs 2 with knitting.

auburnchick
01-08-2007, 02:44 PM
Plus you have all the $$ to yourself to spend on yarn!! :teehee:

madametj
01-08-2007, 07:45 PM
MrTea has posted on this thread hasn't he? :?? )


he hasn't :pout:

riverviewpat
01-08-2007, 07:57 PM
i knit and im a guy, but it seems like to much to lug my stuff with me when i go out, i keep it in my car so if we are just watching tv or movies i knit, my friends actually taught me how to knit about a couple years ago

Luke
01-08-2007, 08:07 PM
I have knitted mostly in airports, on planes, and on cruises. On one occasion, I was knitting the FiberTrends felted clogs on a plane. Since they were to be felted and they were for my huge feet, they were enormous!!! This lady kept looking with this look that said, "bless his heart he is trying to knit and look how big he has made that slipper." The look said it all and was priceless. Mostly people are interested and want to know what I am working on.

Luke

KathyinCali
01-10-2007, 04:26 PM
My husband knits...My big bad retired Green Beret can knit as well as I can. It took him a few tries to not knit so tight the yarn would break but once he got the hang of it he never looked back. His first project was a poncho for me that I will treasure till I die.

Male knitters rock! :muah:

boyforpele13
01-14-2007, 02:19 AM
guy knitter responding late!

i KIP no less than twice a week. I work from home, so I knit at my desk alot, but I go to at least 2 groups a week and knit there, then of course at doctor's appointments, jury duty, etc., even walking through WalMart while working on a very late present I have taught several people how to knit and converted several to Continental along the way and love sharing new techniques like the ones I learn here with the groups (and they love it too.) I was actually supposed to teach my very first official class at a friend's store today, but the ad went out too late in the week and we had no takers. :( Soon, though! :) I spin too and next is quilting!

joe_doufu
01-16-2007, 07:14 AM
I just made a kind of debut performance, knitting for 2 hours while my students took an exam. I have KIP before but for relatively small audiences such as in our dorm's TV room. I got a lot of surprised looks.

madametj
01-16-2007, 06:24 PM
I just made a kind of debut performance, knitting for 2 hours while my students took an exam. I have KIP before but for relatively small audiences such as in our dorm's TV room. I got a lot of surprised looks.

i bet they couldn't concentrate being in the presence of such an swesome phenomenon :teehee:

sksimpson
08-04-2007, 12:14 PM
Hi everyone, I'm a guy knitter and I've been knitting for about 3 years. My grandmother taught me how to crochet when I was little and I made afghans and such. However, I wanted to make sweaters and other garments and crocheted sweaters for men look stupid. So, I got a book about three years ago and taught myself how to knit. Since that time, I can now make just about anything except lace, which is what I'm working on learning now. I make fair isle sweaters, gloves, cabled sweaters, vests, you name it.

I've even done test knitting and had the piece I made published in the book, "Men who Knit and the Dogs that love them", by Annie Modesitt and Drew Emborsky.

I love to knit. I cannot sit in front of the TV without a piece of knitting in my hand. Now, I'm attempting to design and knit my own fair isle sweater.

The last time I knitted in public was on a flight home from New Zealand. The funny thing was that I was fine taking my Skacel needles from the US to NZ and all through the NZ airline system with no hassle until I was coming home. Then, the made me take my knitting off the needles and through them in the trash. Needless to say, I was quite displeased.

BigChuck
12-04-2007, 12:43 PM
Hi everyone, I'm a guy knitter & crocheter who is returning to the hobby after a long layoff. I learned how to knit and crochet while I was in grade school at the age of about 11 or 12. I've haven't seriously done either one in over twenty years. I've just started crocheting within the last month because it was easier for me to remember how to crochet than knit. I stumbled across this site from another board and the videos have really help me get back in the knitting saddle.

I've crocheted me a hat as my first project. Since I did such a good job, my wife has asked me to make her a scarf for my next project.

I big :thumbsup: to all the male knitters and also to the ladies who put up with us here :)

Jan in CA
12-04-2007, 01:12 PM
Welcome, Chuck!:yay:

lelvsdgs
12-04-2007, 01:55 PM
Wow! This is an awesome topic! I am so glad to see that so many men knit and knit in public! And I totally get why women would be attracted to men who knit (and crochet). Just something about seeing a man knit that is err, sexy? Just my opinion...

brainbounce
12-29-2007, 06:01 PM
:guyknitting:
I made a hat for my wife (pics on the finished project forum, 2 color coronet hat)

I ride the bus and train to work. ( I am a union electrician working at a downtown demolition/construction site. ) My wife asked if I was going to knit on the bus or at work, and I said only if she ever wanted me to finish. She was worried I'd get beat up!:noway: I told her that nobody would dare give a big mean construction worker any grief, especially if he had sharp objects in his hands.;)

suzeeq
12-29-2007, 07:25 PM
Heh, yeah. That's sort of how Mason/Knitting guy, the big `mean' truck driver feels about it.... :)

ironmaiden
12-30-2007, 01:28 AM
Men, do you think it is more difficult for you than women to do the physical knitting because your hands are bigger? There are lots of things I can see that would cause men more consternation than women about knitting and it isn't just the stigma attached. I can see picking colors for things, deciding on patterns, etc not as much fun for men than us women, but I may be way off the mark.


Did I miss the memo about the discovery of a "picking colors and deciding on patterns is fun" gene found only in women? :think:

Perhaps it is "easier" for women primarily because we are socialized to believe that these things are important, whereas men are not.:think:

:hair:

hpjc
12-30-2007, 02:05 AM
I just moved from AZ to NY two months ago. I put everything in storage except my clothes, so I didn't have all the things I'm used to (No computer, TV, Computer, Music, Books, etc). I'm going to be bringing that stuff up after winter, so I didn't want to repurchase a lot of those things, but I needed something to do on the commute to work. I have to take a ferry and the subway. I started knitting this week and have been doing it on the ferry and subway. No one has said anything to me, yet, but it's possible that I've gotten funny looks. I tend to concentrate on my knitting as my current project (a simple hat) is actually coming together quite nicely and I don't want to make any mistakes.

phantom92opera
12-30-2007, 11:04 AM
i carry a shoebox filled with all sorts of supplies around everyday to school with me and most of my classmates are cool with it. I have a teacher who finds it annoying, but what can he do? its not a legidimate distraction :)
anyway i knit after tests when everyone else is working. finishing early means more knitting time yay:woohoo:

knitpurlgurl
12-30-2007, 12:45 PM
My 12 yo son is a knitter and knits at the knitting group with me. All of the ladies gush over him and he feels pretty darned special when he goes to knitting group.

knitasha
12-30-2007, 01:45 PM
...I totally get why women would be attracted to men who knit (and crochet). Just something about seeing a man knit that is err, sexy? Just my opinion...


A man who's good with his hands is inherently sexy.....;)

lelvsdgs
12-31-2007, 02:25 PM
A man who's good with his hands is inherently sexy.....;)
Bingo!

BenRosey
01-01-2008, 11:22 PM
Fringe benefits. Pun intended.

Ingrid
01-01-2008, 11:40 PM
Fringe benefits. Pun intended.

:rofl::rofl:

Rabbitrescuer
01-04-2008, 12:27 PM
My son goes to the local knitting group with me & knits. He's only 8 but hey he's still a guy :) He has also taken his knitting with him to doctors appointments. He enjoys all the attention he gets.

Mike
01-28-2008, 05:04 AM
I've only been knitting a week, but I've been crocheting for a few years.

I don't really go in public where I'd be free to do anything like crochet or knit. Plus the majority of my crochet is 8'x8' blankets in SC or HDC so it would be a little bulky to carry around to not even get a single row done.
I have had my sister teach me crochet stitch patterns at family get togethers and I took a blanket I started to a get together to inspire me great niece to finish the blanket she desires (she starts them and decides a scarf is good enough).

I imagine I'll be doing something at the Superbowl party since my sister has some DPNs she picked up for me.

My brother and brother-in-law sort of roll their eyes.
My sister-in-law couldn't believe it but seemed to understand when I said I was an artist and did everything else the hard way (tanning hides, cooking from scratch means starting with a seed).

I often get odd looks buying yarn/needles/hooks at Walmart.

I started crochet for a few reasons. I was having panic attacks and some panic people suggested it as a meditation/mind occupier. I was raised sleeping with quilts and afghans, store bought blankets are too hot and too light. I don't like holes and nobody would make me large blankets in tight single crochet (and now I know why :) ).

The reason I started knitting was the sock program on PBS Create. Store bought wool socks are expensive and don't last, blaze orange stocking caps are cheap but don't fit my big head. I figured between the two it would be worth some elbow grease. Now I'm thinking of a sweater.

I'm definitely the guy knitting/crocheting and yelling at the refs during football. My good luck thing last year was working on a blue and orange afghan during Bears games.

knittingymnast
01-28-2008, 04:49 PM
Exactly! I think people should just do what they like doing, no matter what people think. Knitting is just something that more women do than men, it's not JUST for women.

i SOO agree! although i am not a male knitter, i know this boy in myclass and he BEGGED me (i am get down on you knees hands clasped together begging. :roflhard:) i finally gave in and recently he has begun hats. the only reason i hesitated was i am not patient. i get frustrated so easily and plus i was really new and still basically fooling around with the needles and yarn. im so glad i stuck with it though. :inlove: i am addicted! :roflhard:

KnittingNoob
02-04-2008, 09:12 AM
I started knitting about 4 months ago because I always wanted to learn. I knit when on planes for business trips or long waits elsewhere. What surprises me is the lack of derisive looks I get. Noone seems to mind which is fine with me 'cause I'm gonna do it anyway, lol.

KnittingNoob
02-04-2008, 09:20 AM
Men, do you think it is more difficult for you than women to do the physical knitting because your hands are bigger? There are lots of things I can see that would cause men more consternation than women about knitting and it isn't just the stigma attached. I can see picking colors for things, deciding on patterns, etc not as much fun for men than us women, but I may be way off the mark.

All I can say, is WTG male knitters! :muah:

As for my husband, he can sit for hours and play Risk (gag) or those Soduku puzzles that just plain give me a headache, :hair: but knitting stumps him for some reason. Not that he couldn't do it, I just think he stands outside the box and wonders, why? when you can buy the stuff! In his defense though, I have to say he very much liked my Beatles sweater that I made my grandson.

Faye

I taught myself to do continental knitting with the yarn wrapped twice around the pinky and on top of the rest of the fingers so I could just pivot my index finger down to do a really fast purl. The only problem was because my hands are large this caused a sort of repetitive stress pain in my index finger. Sooo, I taught myself the norwegian purl and voila! no more pain. I love how there are different techniques for any kind of knitting you can think of!

KnitTwit
02-04-2008, 10:37 AM
I think it's WONDERFUL that the men here are knitters and not embarrassed to say it!!! Like "Knitting Guy", I was a cross-country trucker too, back in the day when women were just breaking into that field. I always had my knitting/crocheting with me and it sure passed the time when I waiting for a trailer to get loaded/unloaded. I had my share of rude comments from men about how I should stay home and knit instead of "taking a job away from a man" (even though the truck was mine with my name on the title). So, to all of you manly men here who knit, keep on knitting and just remember: a #10 needle can make a fearsome weapon! :roflhard:

We love you!! :muah: