PDA

View Full Version : Socks


Sweetie
02-28-2007, 07:10 AM
Still relatively new to knitting, I've done some simple hats, scarves, cardigans and pullovers with success and not too many goofs and only occasional frogging. At the yarn shop a few days back, I saw a series of sock projects that the owner was making and fell in love with them. I am now obsessed and have to learn to make socks...but they do look rather scary to try...double pointed needles (doesn't it all fall off?), round needles (looks very small to work on). Can folks suggest a beginner pattern and whether round or double pointed would be better for a beginner?

yarnbee
04-17-2007, 12:41 AM
I'm probably about the same skill level as you and am almost finished with my first pair of socks. I'm using a pattern from The Knitter's Handy Book of Patterns by Ann Budd; they're knit from the top down. I've had no problems whatsoever. This is an excellent book because everything in it (mittens, socks, hats, sweaters, etc.) is charted for different gauges and sizes of the wearer. You may be able to get it at your local public library.

The knowledgeable staff at my LYS recommended that I use a heavier yarn in a solid color for my first pair because it's easier to see what you're doing. They had a 30% off sale on Plassard Plein Aire so I bought 3 balls, enough to do a pair of women's socks. Wood needles are recommended for socks because they grip the stitches, so there's absolutely no worry about them falling out. I'm using #3 Clover bamboo needles.

I've had so much fun with this first pair that I'm hooked on socks. I plan to make more as gifts for next Christmas with some wild yarn!

Jan in CA
04-17-2007, 01:14 AM
Here is the tutorial many of us learned to knit socks with.
http://www.cometosilver.com/socks/SockClass_Intro.htm

You can start with thicker yarn and larger needles to make it easier.

yarnbee
04-17-2007, 11:04 AM
Yes, but as Silver points out in her introduction, the tutorial is not a pattern. It is an excellent, supplementary guideline and since it demos the same type of sock as Ann Budd's pattern, would be worth viewing.
Just to clarify, my Clover bamboos are 5" DPNs. They feel wonderful in your hands.

Shandeh
04-17-2007, 11:51 AM
You could always start out by making baby size socks first, to learn the basics. Then, you could give the socks to charity.

Easy Cotton Baby Socks (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/free_patterns/sock-pattern.php)

Shakey2523
04-20-2007, 07:49 AM
I used this tutorial for my first pair of socks- I had never used DP's before, and found this page very helpful.

http://www.royea.net/sockdemo1.html

kristinw
04-20-2007, 08:12 AM
Yes, but as Silver points out in her introduction, the tutorial is not a pattern. It is an excellent, supplementary guideline and since it demos the same type of sock as Ann Budd's pattern, would be worth viewing.
Just to clarify, my Clover bamboos are 5" DPNs. They feel wonderful in your hands.

Well even though it isn't a "pattern" it really sort of is. It is more a recipe. But you can totally use it as a pattern. It is a basic ribbed leg with stockinette foot.

Did that even make sense?? :shrug:

Rennagayle
04-20-2007, 12:32 PM
I made a complete pair of socks using Silver's Tutorial, with no other pattern.

kathybrat
04-24-2007, 07:38 PM
You could always start out by making baby size socks first, to learn the basics. Then, you could give the socks to charity.

Easy Cotton Baby Socks (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/free_patterns/sock-pattern.php)

This is what I learned to make socks from. Reading patterns and looking at pictures didn't quite do it for me and that I why I was so grateful that this pattern comes complete with video of everything you will need.