PDA

View Full Version : OT: fantasy fiction fans, any good books that you recommend?


Aquaria
04-11-2007, 11:46 PM
I'm recently looking for some good fantasy books and I just wanted to hear some of you guys' recommendations :wink:

Two of the fantasy books that I've read and enjoyed:

Harry Potter series (J. K. Rowling)
The Chronicles of Narnia series (C. S. Lewis)

And I'm considering these recommendations I got from others:

Twilight (Stephenie Meyer) followed by New Moon and Eclipse
Eragon (Christopher Paolini)
Tithe - a modern faerie tale (Holly Black) I actually read a few pages of this one and thought there are bad languages in there so I didn't continue at the moment... It's a good book though from what I've heard from others
The series by David Eddings

If you know any of these books or have any other recommendations please feel free to give my any opinions :) Thank you :notworthy:

Eloewien
04-11-2007, 11:56 PM
Anything by Mercedes Lackey (By the Sword is a good start) or Anne Bishop

sara_jayne
04-12-2007, 12:07 AM
Terry Goodkind's series that starts with "The Wizard's First Rule" is fantastic.

Anything by Terry Brooks is awesome too.

letah75
04-12-2007, 12:13 AM
Anne McCaffrey - Pern series,
Acorna Series,
Freedom Series,
Tower and Hive Series
Anthologies:
Get Off The Unicorn , Severn House Publishers 1982
The Girl Who Heard Dragons , Cheap Street 1985
Alchemy & Academe , Del Rey (Reissue) 1987
A Gift of Dragons , Random House 2002
Serve it Forth: Cooking with Anne McCaffrey , with Edited with John Gregory Betancourt, Wildside Press 2004

Katherine Kurtz - Deryni series

Diana Gabaldon - Outlander series

H. Beam Piper - Fuzzy series

Spider Robinson - Callahan series

Mercedes Lackey - Bard series,
Obsidian trilogy

Zenna Henderson - The People series


Jean Auel - Earth Children series

These are off the top of my head. I'll try to think of more later.

Aquaria
04-12-2007, 12:18 AM
Thanks guys for all these great recommendations :hug:

Keep coming though if there's more! :teehee:

nuknitter
04-12-2007, 01:38 AM
Julian May has an aMAAAZing set of three linked series, and Phillip Pullman has a truly lovely, wonderful trilogy as well (billed for older children, but a good and moving read for us grown-ups as well).

DQ
04-12-2007, 06:26 AM
Well since I'm a moderator here --> http://mendeddrum.5.forumer.com/index.php

I'm going to say Terry Pratchett :P Although we do cater for other fantasy authors etc.

Do you like the look of this? - http://www.stardustmovie.com/site.htm The book is by Neil Gaiman :)

knit-errant
04-12-2007, 07:44 AM
My father-in-law insists these aren't "real" books because they're based off a game, but I just finished reading a bunch of R.A. Salvatore stuff.

I'm not much of a fantasy reader, but my husband talked me into picking up The Dark Elf Trilogy (Homeland, Exile, and Sojourn). I was kind of wary -- again, fantasy isn't really my bag -- but they were really quite good. I liked those well enough that I went out and bought his Icewind Dale Trilogy, and then the Legacy of the Drow books.

SandraEllen
04-12-2007, 08:51 AM
I really liked George RR Martin's Ice and Fire series, but it isn't done yet and he's a little slow so you might want to wait a few (10) years before picking that one up.

Another is the Otherland series by Tad Williams. It's set in the "near future" but it's REALLY interesting. Some parts of it are a little sci-fi ish, but other parts of it are totally fantasy.

Lyndalm
04-12-2007, 09:07 AM
I personally love the Donita K. Paul dragon series, and am eagerly awaiting the next volume!

Lynda M
1992-2006 Homer :pout:

LoAnnie
04-12-2007, 09:27 AM
I agree with what everyone says...since I've read most of the books metioned.

R. A. Salvatore
David Eddings
Spider Robinson
Terry Goodkind

These are all awesome. But no one mentioned Robert Jordan's Wheel of time Series. Also Eragon has a second book called Eldest. I'm reading Eragon right now.

Bridget

SandraEllen
04-12-2007, 09:47 AM
These are all awesome. But no one mentioned Robert Jordan's Wheel of time Series.
Bridget

It's really good, but long. and also unfinished. did you hear that Jordan has a terminal illness?

Knitting_Guy
04-12-2007, 10:34 AM
The Chronicles of Amber series by Roger Zelazny were among my favorites books in college.

Someone beat me to the Dragon Riders of Pern series, also excellent.

LoAnnie
04-12-2007, 10:35 AM
I didn't know he was sick. I was just reading his blog after you told me that. He's been dragging the series on for so long, I hope he gets to finish it. I'm still three books from the last one at this point.

BostonBecca
04-12-2007, 10:59 AM
I am up to the end point on both of those authors series right now. (Robert Jordan/Terry Goodkind) I bet Jordan puts out one or two more book in which he wraps it up (if he already has one written or almost done). I think that was not what he had planned but I think he cares about his readers to have the series wrap up.

I think I have two copies of Phantom by Terry Goodkind, if someone wants to swap with me for one of the copies. I have a hardcover and a paperback I believe if you have a preference. I'd take a nice skein of sock yarn or something else nice for the hardcover and a skein of something less nice for the paperback. I just don't need two copies and I bought one at the airport thinking I had not read it. PM me if you are interested!

PS. I love all the ideas for new books to read!

Stiney
04-12-2007, 11:17 AM
Anything by Neil Gaiman.
Anything by Terry Pratchett.
Anything by Tad Williams. (Side note: My friend just started a job at literary agency. Two of her authors called just to say hello and introduce themselves. Tad Williams, and Eric :!!!: Idle!!!!!!!)
Philip Pullman's His Dark Materials trilogy
David Eddings, The Belgariad and the Mallorean, and associated books. Don't bother with the Elenium/Tamuli trilogies.
Robert Jordan's Wheel of Time. (This series has sucked up way too many hours of my life. :teehee:)
Andre Norton & Mercedes Lackey wrote a few books together. The first is ElvenBane, good books.
The Lord of the Rings and the Hobbit. If you are brave, the Silmarillion. ;)
If you enjoy Terry Pratchett, check out Douglas Adams (though he's SciFi.)
If you like graphic novels, Gaiman's Sandman series and Carey's Lucifer series (set in the Sandman universe, but a spinoff.)
Dune, if you are brave.
Lloyd Alexander's Prydain Chronicles (these are kid's books, but they're excellent.) Also his Westmark Trilogy is fantastic.
Orson Scott Card--his Alvin Maker books are good, as is Ender's Game. (Haven't read the sequals to it yet.)
Marion Zimmer Bradley has some good Arthur books from the female perspective--starting with Mists of Avalon.
Susan Cooper's Dark is Rising books are popular, but not to my taste.

Ummm I can't think of anymore right now.

Stiney
04-12-2007, 11:20 AM
Oh yes, wanted to second recommendations for the Pern books by McCaffrey and George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire books.

Warning on Martin: he is an excellent writer in that he knows that there aren't always happy endings. People DO die. No matter how much of a main character they seem to be.

SandraEllen
04-12-2007, 11:38 AM
Oh yes, wanted to second recommendations for the Pern books by McCaffrey and George R. R. Martin's Song of Ice and Fire books.

Warning on Martin: he is an excellent writer in that he knows that there aren't always happy endings. People DO die. No matter how much of a main character they seem to be.

my SIL quit reading that series becasue her favorite character died 1/2 way through the first book.

Stiney
04-12-2007, 11:39 AM
:pout: It was really, really sad. But I still love the books.

Mommy22alyns
04-12-2007, 12:11 PM
I am so darn picky about my fantasy fiction, but I've been a huge fan of George R.R. Martin (and when the heck is the next one coming out?) and Robert Jordan. Actually, I lost steam on The Wheel of Time and I'd like to pick it back up again.

The Martin series - I like it kind of because he's not afraid to kill people off. Like 24! It's unpredictable. I like to be surprised and that's hard to do.

What types of fantasy are some of these other books? I like mine rustic - hiking places, eating cheese by campfires, etc. :teehee:

misha rf
04-12-2007, 12:14 PM
I'm putting in a plug for Tamora Pierce. She's got two separate worlds--the Tortall books & the Circle of Magic books. The latter are a bit on the younger side (except for the most recent). She's also doing a fantasy audiobook later this year--it was written to be an audiobook, and will come out in print several months after.

Here's her book list:

http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk/p/tamora-pierce/

The covers on a lot of them have been redone (thankfully).

I also agree with books by Neil Gaiman. :happydance: I :heart: Neil Gaiman!!

Stiney
04-12-2007, 12:22 PM
Ooh, I loved The Lioness Quartet when I was growing up! I got the first sequal set and wasn't thrilled with it. I wanted more Alanna books. :pout:

letah75
04-12-2007, 12:32 PM
All good books have been mentioned, here is another series that is simple yet entertaining. Piers Anthony Incarnations of Immortality series. They are small quick reads, but quite enjoyable.

I also like "Job: A Comedy of Justice by Robert A. Heinlein" but then I like almost anything by Heinlein.

feminine_earth
04-12-2007, 01:34 PM
Anything by Juliet Marillier makes for a fantastic read, but her Sevenwaters Trilogy is exceptionally good. Definitely my favorite series ever. :heart:

Also, Anne Kelleher's Silver's Edge and Silver's Bane are excellent books. :)

TeenKnitter
04-12-2007, 04:03 PM
Daughter of the Forest by Juliet Marillier
Son of the Shadows by Juliet Marillier
Child of the Prophecy by Juliet Marillier
All of the above are part of an amazing trilogy which I STRONGLY recommend. (I'm a book nerd, can't you tell?)
I also strongly recommend Eragon, which you listed.

If you do read Tithe and like it, I would recommend Valiant, which is also by Holly Black, and The Blue Girl by Charles de Lint.

I am in LOVE with Juliet Marillier's books, she is an adult historical fantasy writer, whose books are amazing. She is my favorite writer ever, and that's saying alot, considering how many books I've read.

:thumbsup:

Calamintha
04-12-2007, 05:18 PM
Nobody has mentioned Robin Hobb but I really like her books. If you haven't read anything by her you might want to start with the Farseer Trilogy.

I also have really enjoyed all of Katherine Kerr's Deverry novels. And Lois McMaster Bujold's The Curse of Chalion was great although I didn't like the follow-up as much. Tigana by Guy Gavriet Kay was one of the best fantasy novels I've ever read I think.

George R. R. Martin's book are wonderful also. He really makes every sentence count and the characters are all quite interesting. However, as several people have already pointed out he has yet to finish the series and it is literally years and years between each book. When the last one finally came out it had been so long since I had read the previous one I couldn't remember what was going on. Unlike many series there was no capsule summary of the plot so far either.

The next volume is supposed to be the last but after reading the current one I'm not sure he can tie up all the loose ends in one more book. Anyone care to take bets?

mare-nitt
04-12-2007, 05:29 PM
I second the series by Diana Gabaldon - Outlander series It is wonderful and a fast read.

If anyone is interested I could post it in the swap, trade.

Marilynn

Aquaria
04-12-2007, 06:44 PM
Yay! Now I've wrote down a whole bunch of fantastic books and authors on my book list! :) I'll be checking all these out in the library! Thanks everyone :muah:

psammeadred
04-12-2007, 07:57 PM
Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors. I am surprised, though, that no one's mentioned Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time!

Stiney
04-12-2007, 08:23 PM
Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors. I am surprised, though, that no one's mentioned Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time!

Ooh, yes, all of her books! My favorite was "A Ring of Endless Light" (I think?) It wasn't as fantasyish as the Wrinkle in Time books, but it did still have some stuff. I also liked how so many of her characters came back in different books.

ironmaiden
04-12-2007, 08:30 PM
Wheel of Time, Robert Jordan - these were some of the most entertaining and well written books I've ever read.

beckyrhae
04-12-2007, 09:29 PM
I second these:
Robert Jordan although I have only read Wheel of Time.
R.A. Salvatore wonderful stuff!

But noone has mentioned a few that I love.

Michael Moorcock. The Enternal Champion. Very few writers can pen Sci/Fi and Fantasy. This man can.

Dennis McKiernan. Iron Tower Trillogy just to start... this man picked up where Tolken left off... Bloody Brilliant.

and lastly... Melanie Rawn. The Dragon Prince books... wow... such an original world. I obsessed over these when all my friends where lost in Pern. :)

Aquaria
04-13-2007, 02:24 AM
Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors. I am surprised, though, that no one's mentioned Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time!

Ohhh yes, I've read A Wrinkle in Time and I think there are sequels, can't find them in my school library though :pout: . I'll look for them in our local libraries in Vancouver anyway :wink: .

lostchyld
04-17-2007, 04:23 PM
Of what hasn't been mentioned, Jennifer Roberson has a couple good series finished. The Novels of Tiger and Del and the Chronicles of the Cheysuli, she also has a new series in progress called Karavans that I haven't attempted yet. Jacqueline Carey has a beautiful trilogy beginning with Kushiel's Dart, but that trilogy deserves a notice of graphic adult situations, so use your best judgement there. I would also point out Sara Douglass as an author. I've only read The Troy Game and the Wayfarer Redemption, but I'll risk putting her on my list of favorite authors. Finally, Margaret Weis's Darksword Trilogy is excellent.


In the area of Young Adult Fiction, I'd recommend Redwall by Brian Jacques, if you're ok with talking animals. Diane Duane's Young Wizards series is also interesting, but it's at the young end of Young Adult fiction. So You Want to be a Wizard is the first. Sabriel and its sequels by Garth Nix are also very good. They're set in a darker world, though. Also, Inkheart by Cornelia Funke.

For dark historical fantasy, J Gregory Keyes has a wonderful series beginning with Newton's Cannon that's an alternate history involving alchemy. That's really the extent of my knowledge here.

Fantasy reading wouldn't be fun if there wasn't some random humor insterted. To that end, Piers Anthony's Magic Kingdom of Xanth is good for a laugh or two, but I've only read A Spell for Chameleon. Robert Asprin wrote Another Fine Myth and a series in the same set of worlds. The series is about the Myth-adventures of a wizard named Skeeve. It's quite funny. Finally, Terry Brooks' Magic Kingdom of Landover is also brilliant.

Into older books, my all-time favorite classic is The Land that Time Forgot by Edgar Rice Burroughs. I also like the Mists of Avalon by Marion Zimmer Bradley. I couldn't bring myself to attack the sequels, though. Oscar Wilde's Portrait of Dorian Grey is interesting, as is Stoker's Dracula. Actually, watch League of Extraordinary Gentlemen and then read the related books.

There's a bunch of stuff that was mentioned that I need to second. Anne McCaffrey is my favorite author and I highly recommend anything she has written. I particularly enjoyed The Powers that Be.

Dune needs to be seconded as well, but I'd recommend finding a read along group, because it's difficult to follow at times and having several someones to discuss it with would make it easier.

Katherine Kerr's Deverry novels were supremely enjoyable.

I'm also going to second David Eddings, specifically the Elenium, which is really all I've read.

Pullman's His Dark Materials is the other outstanding suggestion that I saw.

I'd caution agains Jordan's Wheel of Time. There are too many characters and the story keep resetting. Fundamentally, the series has just been on one arc for too long and nothing is getting accomplished. The same is true of Goodkind's Sword of Truth. I lost interest in both series.

And, this isn't fantasy but you should read it anyways, the Sharpe Series by Bernard Cornwell. It's currently my favorite. Peninsular war and Wellington's Army for the win. ;)

Cheers.

-Caet

raederle
04-18-2007, 11:57 AM
Someone already listed Jacqueline Carey and Garth Nix, but let me plug them again.
If you are comfortable with Adult Situations in Fantasy (more graphic than most Romance novels) AND had a fascination with the Da Vinci Code (which to me, could be counted towards Fantasy/Alternate History, but that's just me) then the Kushiel series is for you. Three books in the original trilogy, each long without being tedious, and very intriguing premise. Plus, she's writing the second of the second trilogy right now, and isn't too slow.

Garth Nix writes for children/teens, but his Abhorsen trilogy, beginning with Sabriel, is his finest work. I have enjoyed the "Day" series, beginning with Mister Monday, which is complex and real and set in our world with an attendant "rabbit hole world" the main character gets lost in. Excellent!

If Vampires and Adult situations are your bag, then Laurell K. Hamilton breaks genre boundaries with her Anita Blake series, beginning with Guilty Pleasures. Her writing is addictive, but "jumped the shark" with Narcissus in Chains, some say even before that. I have no problem with some of the plot choices she's made, though many fans do, and have stopped reading due to them, but the editorial quality of her writing ALSO suffered, which to me is unacceptable.

Sharon Shinn is in the same writing group as Hamilton (that's one way I find new authors, who do they write with? Check out author websites, like G.R.R. Martin's for book updates and who THEY read...) and her Angels of Samaria series is complex and the world is skillfully built. If you like Pern, and the Harper Hall books in particular by McCaffrey, you might want to check out Shinn. Start with Archangel.

Let's see, my favorite author is Sheri S. Tepper. I strongly caution you that she is a feminist writer, and has strong themes developed throughout her work. They are hard to get (out-of-print), but the Mavin Many-Shaped books are wonderful and it's an incredible world. Start with The Song of Mavin Manyshaped, if you can find it used. The True Game, a bundling of Peter's books, is still in print, and the three trilogies are related, all short books, but fascinating and I love her work so much it makes me ache. The Jinian series is last, but Peter or Mavin are both good entry points. And then she has many many stand-alone books but, like I said, caution: strong political themes ahead.

Patricia McKillip, but then you will know where my nickname comes from. :) Robin McKinley, especially the Hero and the Crown 1st and the Blue Sword 2nd. Joan Vinge, Snow Queen/Summer Queen duology. Rhapsody: Child of Blood by Elizabeth Haydon is interesting, and there are two direct sequels, with more

I second Tamora Pierce, David Eddings (but forget the Younger Gods stuff- total crap. The Belgariad was awesome, the Mallorean was the same series re-written, but still pretty good, and the Elenium/Tamuli is only for helpless fans to get out of the library.)

There are very few authors whose books I buy in hardcover (used to not do it at all) and there are some authors who I used to snap up the day they came out and now don't even get from the library. McCaffrey and her Acorna series is one example. Must read her early work, forget the later stuff. Piers Anthony, another good example. Xanth fell by the wayside probably long before book 16 or so when I stopped reading it.

Authors age. Their kids need braces. Misery by Stephen King is an extreme example of inside the writing process, when a psychotic fan wants more of the same...

Okay, enough expounding. I love fantasy though, and had to chime in.

psammeadred
04-18-2007, 12:46 PM
Douglas Adams is one of my favorite authors. I am surprised, though, that no one's mentioned Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time!

Ohhh yes, I've read A Wrinkle in Time and I think there are sequels, can't find them in my school library though :pout: . I'll look for them in our local libraries in Vancouver anyway :wink: .

The Wrinkle in Time sequels are A Wind in the Door, A Swiftly Tilting Planet, and Many Waters.

Lucy78green
04-18-2007, 01:57 PM
I love Robert Jordan too, I prefer him to Terry Goodkind as I find his books a bit preachy (also don't read if you are upset by reading about rape etc).
I love Ursula Le Guinn (some of it is more sci-fi than fantasy) as she sets up unusual societies and explores them (I think her dad was an anthropologist or something). I love Terry Pratchett too!
I also like:
L.E. Modesitt
Cecilia Dart-Thornton (bit on the romantic side though)
Jennifer Fallon (Harshini trilogy)
Mickey Zucker Reichert
More for kids:
Alan Garner (The Owl Service ) Welsh legends etc
Susan Cooper (The Dark Is Rising Sequence)
That's all I can think of off the top of my head, most of the books I've read are from the library so I don't have them lying around to remind me!

Ellieblue
04-18-2007, 02:00 PM
My favorite has to be 'The gormenghst Trilogy' by Mervyn Peake. He writes in a style that is unique. If you can get through the first chapter you will not be able to put it down.

Lucy78green
04-18-2007, 02:04 PM
My favorite has to be 'The gormenghst Trilogy' by Mervyn Peake. He writes in a style that is unique. If you can get through the first chapter you will not be able to put it down.
The BBC made a "for tv" film of that a few years ago was quite good
http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/gormenghast/

Ellieblue
04-18-2007, 02:15 PM
Yes, I did see the film and was quite surprised at what a good job they did.I still recommend reading the books because there is so much more there for your imagination to dwell on.

Stonington
04-19-2007, 08:35 AM
Good morning,
Has anyone read "The Children of Hurin" by J.R.R. Tolkien? Thoughts? Thanks so much! :hug:

anne

lauraknits
04-19-2007, 09:34 AM
Wow, I consider myself a pretty serious Tolkien fan and i have not heard of Children of Herin! I will have to check it out.

Some of my other favorites
Madeleine L'Engle Wrinkle in Time series mentioned a couple times already. I really got a kick out of Progonoskis (a character)

Ursula LeGuin, also mentioned. Her Earthsea Trilogy is one of my favorites, although it's more than 3 now. The first 3 are the "real" trilogy, the others she added much later from another character's point of view.

Orson Scott Card - Ender's Game series. I thought Ender's Game was really great. the next couple, in my opinion, were not as great but ok, and the most recent few are very very cool. Lots of social commentary, but in my opinion not really preachy.

Stiney
04-19-2007, 11:35 AM
Good morning,
Has anyone read "The Children of Hurin" by J.R.R. Tolkien? Thoughts? Thanks so much! :hug:

anne

:?? Is that one of the posthumously published, edited by Christopher Tolkein books?

Stonington
04-19-2007, 11:41 AM
Good morning,
Has anyone read "The Children of Hurin" by J.R.R. Tolkien? Thoughts? Thanks so much! :hug:

anne

:?? Is that one of the posthumously published, edited by Christopher Tolkein books?

Yes I believe so. I am going to stop into Borders tomorrow and look at it. I have such a little time to read lately and most of Tolkien's books require full attention to detail.... I wish that amazon had a sneak preview of the inside.

anne

DianaM
04-19-2007, 01:07 PM
Glad I'm not the only McKiernnan fan here ^^

A friend of my bf's loaned me the first three books in the Nightside Series by Simon R Green and I'm enjoying them a lot. If you don't like things crudely put and foul language, you probably won't like them.

Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King is good too.

Would Marion Zimmer Bradley be considered fantasy or SF?

Leseeeeeee.....
Anything by Tolkier and Gaiman.

Leah22b
04-19-2007, 01:48 PM
I have to 2nd that Diane Duane's Wizards series is very good.

I also suggest:

Pendragon Series by D. J. MacHale

Kelly Armstrong's Otherworld Series (More Adult) starts with "Bitten" If you like Laurell K. Hamilton you will most likely enjoy Kelly's books as well.

SandraEllen
04-19-2007, 01:57 PM
I really liked the first 3 Terry Goodkind books from the Sword of Truth series, but they got pretty bad after that. :wall: I don't know what it was. Maybe I just expected better. :shrug: I've given up on them though.

Eyes of the Dragon by Stephen King is good too
It's been YEARS since I read that one, but it was good...

SandraEllen
04-19-2007, 01:58 PM
oops...

DianaM
04-19-2007, 05:08 PM
...you did it again.



....sorry couldn't help myself :roflhard: