PDA

View Full Version : Why knitted washcloths?


Susan P.
04-17-2007, 04:56 AM
You know, I must admit, I've never come across knitted washcloths in Australia and really wasn't aware of them until I came here. Can people tell me why you like them and how you deal with the typical 'smelly washcloth' issue? I use commercial ones now like sponges with a no scratch scourer on the back because I kept finding the thin cloths inevitably became smelly.
What is the best type of yarn to use?

DQ
04-17-2007, 05:09 AM
You know, I must admit, I've never come across knitted washcloths in Australia and really wasn't aware of them until I came here. Can people tell me why you like them and how you deal with the typical 'smelly washcloth' issue? I use commercial ones now like sponges with a no scratch scourer on the back because I kept finding the thin cloths inevitably became smelly.
What is the best type of yarn to use?

Eeeeeeeeeee I hate smelly washcloths!

Emeraldcutie
04-17-2007, 05:15 AM
I love my knitted dish clothes, they scrub nice and they don't wear out as fast as store bought ones.
When I am done using mine I give it a quick hand wash with some dish soap and hang them on the hooks on the back of the cupboard door , under my sink. As long as they are hung to dry, they don't gather that ewww smell from being left balled up in the sink.

Susan P.
04-17-2007, 06:34 AM
Me also DQ

Emeraldcutie..do you use mainly a nylon based yarn?

dakatzmeow
04-17-2007, 09:00 AM
blech. nylon yarn in a washcloth= naaaaaaaaaaaasty! horrible feeling on your hands! i prefer all cotton. that way, i can bleach them.

LoAnnie
04-17-2007, 09:01 AM
I use cotton, but I've heard that acrylic gives a better scratching quality, for stuck on food.

LoAnnie

Jill A.
04-17-2007, 09:52 AM
I prefer using something disposable when I wash dishes.
I have been making cotton dishclothes though.

I was trying to knit a sweater with a cotton blend yarn that was giving me fits! :!!!:

I started making dishclothes in 100% cotton, trying out some of the stitch patterns from the sweater, hoping that the sweater yarn will seem easier after this.

I will give the dishclothes to my mother when I am done, because she quite likes them.

Yarnlady
04-17-2007, 09:53 AM
I've used 100% cotton. Once a week I soak my dishcloth and sponge in a mild bleach solution to kill all the bacteria and destroy food particles. It's the food particles breaking down that cause the odor. Yes, eventually, the color does fade out, but as my daughter says, "It's a dishrag!" :rofl:

With that said, I've heard lots of good comments about Lion Brand microspun for dishcloths, and believe it or not, socks, too. One would think 100% acrylic would not be the answer yet those that have made both swear by it. :shrug:

Susan P.
04-17-2007, 09:56 AM
Jill A. Why the problem knitting with the cotton..cos it takes forever? Or you hated the feeling? :)

Bastelmutti
04-17-2007, 09:59 AM
I don't actually use them to wash dishes. I wipe counters with them. Also, I make small washcloths (swatches) for the bath to try out new stitch patterns. If you include a loop and hang them up to dry, they don't get smelly. We do wash them in the washer every now and then, though.

dustinac
04-17-2007, 10:00 AM
I use 100% cotton and have not kept one dishrag lol.. the friends and family I gave them to always comment on how much they love them...they say they clean better and more durable.. Martha asked me to teach her to knit this summer so she could make her some more... I should make one for myself and use it but I just throw them in my gift box...I just stick to the Grandmother's dish rag pattern that way I can work on them where ever without a pattern or concern of messing up... :happydance:

Susan P.
04-17-2007, 10:00 AM
dakatzmeow/Yarnlady. I have to admit I'd want to bleach too..if I used them. I can't imagine it tho - BUT I would consider making dusters or wash cloths for the shower. Oddly I feel better about that. Tho I'd give a dishcloth a try.

Loannie. Yes, that ability to scratch off is useful. I think also this depends on your sink situation. If you have a 'soaker' sink (two sinks) that helps a lot. I remember visiting my son when he was living in this swank apartment with others for a while and it had the most ditzy tiny sink with no draining board area so water used to go everywhere. I think you were supposed to eat out all the time :-)

brokenblossoms
04-17-2007, 10:09 AM
I just knitted my first a few days ago, but I've used them before at other peoples' houses. Anyway, I like them because they're environmentally friendly.

ironmaiden
04-17-2007, 11:08 AM
I would treat it pretty much the same a sponge -- soap and rinse after using, hang, spray with Lysol (don't leave it in a heap somewhere, hang it so it dries) - every couple of days, throw stuff like this in the wash on hot with a little bleach.

:shrug:

I am thinking of making some for myself just for the practice.

MommaG
04-17-2007, 11:30 AM
I love using the dishcloths that I knit. They scrub better without scrathing off the finish and I just through them in the hot water wash with my dish towels and bathroom towels. My grandmother gave me my first one years ago and I didn't know what it was at first but once I discovered what it was I loved it. I didn't knit then so I used to crochet mine until I learned to knit. Now I put tops on dish towels and make a couple cloths and there is a small wedding shower gift.

auburnchick
04-17-2007, 11:42 AM
I really like my knitted dishcloths too. They are so pretty! So far I only have two, but when I get my other projects done, I plan on knitting up a bunch and trashing my old, non-knitted ones.

I have a rule in our house that we use the dishcloth for one day, and then it goes into the laundry. Same goes for dish towels. The whole bacteria thing makes me :ick:

Susan P.
04-17-2007, 05:31 PM
Thanks ladies. Well, something I may try. I've found some older knitted draw string type bags my mother made very useful. Great when you move and you want to store various small objects and so on.

efsaturn
04-17-2007, 06:32 PM
Well that was sort of my exact question. One of my magazines has a new pattern in each issue for a dishrag. So I guess I will try one and then I may actually end up with a completed project. Yeh!

samm
04-17-2007, 07:03 PM
I like my knitted and crocheted dishcloths and don't use anything else. I change my kitchen towels and dishcloth every day, and hang the cloth to dry by the washer until it is washed, so it never gets smelly. Rinsing it well after doing dishes helps too. I've not had a problem with them at all! samm

Arielluria
04-17-2007, 08:19 PM
I love my knitted dish clothes, they scrub nice and they don't wear out as fast as store bought ones.
When I am done using mine I give it a quick hand wash with some dish soap and hang them on the hooks on the back of the cupboard door , under my sink. As long as they are hung to dry, they don't gather that ewww smell from being left balled up in the sink.I'm new to dishcloths too, I don't even know what yarn to use but would like to make one.

My store-bought ones I throw in the hot water wash with clorox, I like them REAAAAAAAALLLLLLLY CLEAN! So can you do that with knitted ones????

BinkyKat
04-17-2007, 09:24 PM
Every couple days I clip my sponge to the rack in the dishwasher and letter go. You still have to hang to dry, but it works slick. I imagine doing the same with a cloth would be fine. I have a bag of plastic laundy clips I use for bags and such...more economical than fancy bag clips (tip a'la mil) and never melted in the dishwasher...top rack! :thumbsup:

dakatzmeow
04-17-2007, 11:10 PM
peaches and creme cotton works for me. i have taken to buying the cone size since i cranked out several washcloth/soap sets for a fund-raiser auction.

baronreads
04-18-2007, 12:02 AM
You know you can disinfect dishcloths in the microwave. Make sure they're damp and microwave on high for a minute or two, until it gets hot and steamy. This will kill all of that smell bacteria and you don't have to worry about bleach fading the colors. The teachers used to do this in the lounge.

redwitch
04-18-2007, 01:26 AM
Yes microwave all sponges, dishrags, etc. Items that have been washed in a washing machine come out with all sorts of bacteria that you don't want to know about or the origin of, left over from towels and undies. A study that examined this recommended that you run an empty bleach cycle in between, to keep kitchen items uncontaminated.
I'd microwave my teatowels after coming out of the washing machine, and always microwave sponges etc. frequently to keep away that bacterial smell. Dish-washing/scrubbing brushes too. 2 minutes per item is about right (it WILL be hot when it's finished! let it cool).
Keeping them dry will help too, I have been told that lacy dishcloths are good because the lace texture scrubs well, but the negative space/laciness means they dry very fast.

Sarah

Susan P.
04-18-2007, 01:28 AM
That's an interesting solution and for those who hate using bleach a potential boon idea!

Mazie
04-18-2007, 03:16 AM
My ex-mother in law used to use the lace doilies I crocheted for her as dish rags. She said they were 'the best' at cleaning pots and pans. After she told me, the silly woman couldn't understand why I never made her another doily, she loved them so much. :??

Susan P.
04-18-2007, 05:07 AM
Pragmatism vs aestheticism? :-)
(practical vs beauty)

Arielluria
04-18-2007, 10:59 AM
OK so it should be made of COTTON yarn?

Jan in CA
04-18-2007, 01:00 PM
OK so it should be made of COTTON yarn?

Dishcloths? Yes, as a general rule they are made of cotton because cotton is absorbent.

ArtLady made some from microspun though and I gave it a try and I do like them. They aren't quite as absorbent as cotton, but once they've been washed a few times they do pretty well. They stay nicer looking, too.

Arielluria
04-18-2007, 03:18 PM
100% cotton or blends?

Susan P.
04-18-2007, 07:11 PM
It would be 100% because the blend material is usually water resistant.

dink
04-20-2007, 12:05 PM
I'm going to be making a few dishcloths over the next month (I'm thinking Mother's Day). I've never made them before, so I'm wondering, how tight to knit them? Is tighter better to the durability of the dishcloth, or is that actually bad? :thinking:

Jill A.
04-20-2007, 12:11 PM
Susan P.

Sorry I haven't responded - my kids are out for spring break, which means less computer time.

I don't use any type of dishcloth that can be washed an reused. I just hate picking up a cloth that has already been used. I either use the blue shop towels (like from Costco) that last one or two meals, or I use the thin scrubie things - blue on one side and white on the other. They are both super thin, cheap to buy, and disposible.

My husband and I totally don't agree about dishclothes, so when it's his week, he uses what he likes, and I use what I like!!

Arielluria
04-20-2007, 03:06 PM
I'm going to be making a few dishcloths over the next month (I'm thinking Mother's Day). I've never made them before, so I'm wondering, how tight to knit them? Is tighter better to the durability of the dishcloth, or is that actually bad? :thinking:I need to know too! Anyone of your expert dishcloth knitters?????????? What 100% yarn and needle size do you recommend?

hydho71
04-20-2007, 03:41 PM
Although I am by no means an experienced knitter, I've knit my fair share of washcloths- about 45 to date :happydance:
I've used peaches n cream, sugar n cream and lionbrand cotton, and liked all of them. I prefer the lionbrand, although it's just a tad more expensive. I've also found that bamboos work best with cotton as they hold on to it a bit more. washcloths are fun- there's a ton of great patterns out there, and they are also a fabulous way to learn new stitches!

I do wash mine daily, and also use them for the bath; ultra luxurious! They make fabulous little hostess or add on gifts, especially paired with a nice bar of soap!

HTH
Heidi

Arielluria
04-20-2007, 03:43 PM
I can't wait to start my first! What size needle do you prefer, or does it vary between those 3 yarns you mentioned?

hydho71
04-20-2007, 03:43 PM
oh, and as for needle size- i use anywhere from a 5-7; depending on my mood, and whats on the other needles!

hydho71
04-20-2007, 03:46 PM
http://knittingpatterncentral.com/directory/dishcloths.php
tons of great patterns

http://knittingpatterncentral.com/directory/stitches.php
if you want to wing it yourself and just try new stitches

hydho71
04-20-2007, 03:52 PM
oops; double post!

Arielluria
04-20-2007, 03:52 PM
I think this would be a great way to try all those great stitches of the week in Lion Brand's e-newsletter. Here's a link to their Stitch Finder (http://cache.lionbrand.com/stitchFinder.html). I'm knitting (in the back burner right now) a scarf where I change the stitch every 6 " or so, like a sampler.

hydho71
04-20-2007, 03:53 PM
yup! i love lionbrands stitches! i've done several clothes from them! The scarf sounds so fun! please post pics when your done!

Susan P.
04-20-2007, 07:15 PM
Arielluria. Love the stitch finder reference. Thanks! I know you've put it aside but how are you finding the 'look' of the scarf given you're changing the stitches. Does it look intriguing or higgeldy piggeledy. :-) I presume you're staying in same colour?

Arielluria
04-20-2007, 08:15 PM
Yup, same color. I'll post a picture and you can decide whether it's higglety-piglety.......you read Opus, don't you?!? ;)

Susan P.
04-21-2007, 02:03 AM
It's a term I grew up with actually :-) so I'm not sure what the source was.

Susan P.
04-21-2007, 02:09 AM
Well, believe it or not my two (only) local yarn shops sell NO cotton yarns at all. The closest thing is a cotton thin 'yarn' you use 3mm needles on (so mainly for doilies etc). Compared to the images of wash cloths I've seen so far it is totally unsuitable. I can buy acrylic only. I will have to order online but I'm rather amazed. No wool/cotton blends either. I live in a fairly humid climate so I'm surprised!

Quiltlady
04-21-2007, 04:14 PM
I like the idea of knitting smaller items but I just am not into knitting dish cloths. :shrug:

DQ
04-22-2007, 05:41 AM
I've got some cotton in my stash so I've decided to try do some dishcloths for presents :mrgreen:

Susan P.
04-22-2007, 06:18 AM
Hah! Send me some cotton! :-) Tapestry Craft in Sydney is where I order most of my yarns if I need to go online.

dawnk777
04-22-2007, 11:35 AM
I love making cotton dishcloths. I love getting them as gifts. I love using them! They are a nice small project that I can actually finish. I'm working on one now, but I messed up the pattern last night, so I have rip out a few rows. :(

They make nice gifts, too. We also discovered that the Hobby Lobby that is close to our house, has all the Sugar N Cream colors, too! Woo hoo!

of troy
04-22-2007, 03:05 PM
You can take all the ends of balls (most 2 oz balls of cotton make 2 washcloths, and there is some left over )
and mix with a giant 14 ounce ball of a solid, and make a matching bath (or if you use your wash cloths as dish cloths, a kitchen) mat.

work with 2 strands held together, and a size 10or 10.5 needle, cast on between 65 to 85 stitches.
work in garter, 2 rows of solid (14 ounce skein) 2 rows off 'scrap' from wash cloth balls--

repeat until you are bored or have used up all your cotton scraps.

see my blog (recent post) for 2 examples. (36 hours and cotton to knitting posts)

Susan P.
04-22-2007, 08:23 PM
Of Troy. I saw someone mentioning bath mats the other day so I'd glad you gave a 'recipe' for those. The work on your blog looks great!

of troy
04-22-2007, 11:00 PM
thanks!

one is knitted "landscape" (25 inches long row, and about 20 inches of them) the other is knit "portrait" 20 inch long rows, and 26 inches of them.

you could make them larger (or smaller) depending on your stash (and stamina! )

Susan P.
04-23-2007, 06:55 AM
Ahh..you're using the word processing perspective? :-) I first thought you were being very poetic but I love the analogy! :hug:

dink
04-23-2007, 11:51 AM
I just made 2 dishcloths over the weekend. In fact, I made one for my boyfriend, thinking he'd use it (originally he told me he would) and now, last night, he said he's just going to keep it in the kitchen. He doesn't want to ruin it!

I'm hoping to make one for myself this week. I made the other for my mom (thinking of making a few for Mother's Day for her). Chances are, she won't use hers either because she doesn't want to ruin them! Me, I'm going to dive right in & give it a shot!

of troy
04-23-2007, 02:06 PM
art photgraphy perspective before it was word processing perspective!

Arielluria
04-25-2007, 02:10 PM
Arielluria. Love the stitch finder reference. Thanks! I know you've put it aside but how are you finding the 'look' of the scarf given you're changing the stitches. Does it look intriguing or higgeldy piggeledy. :-) I presume you're staying in same colour?Here's that sample scarf. I made it kind of narrow because I like really long scarfs, and if they are too wide it becomes too thick when I wrap several times around: Here's a post about it (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/viewtopic.php?p=447429#447429)

http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/files/img_9755_xsm.jpg

CarmenIbanez
04-25-2007, 03:27 PM
I am making some flower washcloths for my mom for mother's day. She is a spa enthusiast and loves to have luxurious things in the bathroom. So I am going to knit them and then dye them so she can have her own original one of a kind facial cloths. I guess whether it is worth depends on who is going to use them?

CarmenIbanez
04-25-2007, 03:28 PM
By the way, I found this (http://stores.ebay.com/Fab-Fibers) source on ebay for cotton chenille. I received mine this week and it is amazing! Just as nice as the expensive stuff I have, and so affordable!

Susan P.
04-25-2007, 09:47 PM
Arielluria. I like the scarf colour and the changes look good. Very textured in fact. What is the yarn you are using? Not quite all the way but it looks like you're offering an edging that's all the same..seed stitch?

Susan P.
04-25-2007, 09:51 PM
CarmenIbanez. Lovely idea. I always like to try and grab some nice lavender stalks and wrap them in something like that. But maybe a nice natural soap or face wash? My health food store (local I mean) has some lovely soaps. One is orange scented (not a nasty scent like some cheap ones are in soaps) and has these little soluble beads all through it so it's textured and interesting. But they just brought our a range of mango body wash and so on and the bottle is filled with a sort of gel that has bubbles all through it so it looks so lovely for something like a spa. But that's so nice you're making something. Last year I did a cross stitch card that my mother really liked.

humblestumble
04-26-2007, 01:05 AM
You know, I use cotton for mine. I don't really like washing dishes with them, but I do when there's nothing else. I like wiping counters with them. I bleach them after use so there is no "smelly" issue here. I use white yarn.

Arielluria
04-26-2007, 10:14 AM
Arielluria. I like the scarf colour and the changes look good. Very textured in fact. What is the yarn you are using? Not quite all the way but it looks like you're offering an edging that's all the same..seed stitch?Hi, it's Red Heart yarn. The edging is just a garter stitch - 5 stitches on each side.

Arielluria
04-26-2007, 03:50 PM
Just got some 100% cotton Peaches 'n Cream @ Walmart :cheering: Can't wait to try a washcloth!

I don't do dishes with my regular washcloths, but I use them to wipe counters, and I'm a stickler for clean ones. I keep a small basket under my sink which I call my washcloth hamper. As soon as one gets dirty I throw it in there for laundry day. On laundry day I add do a quick short wash in cold just to get the ickiness out - no soap. Then, put in the rest of my whites with bleach. I hope the knitted ones can take all that! ;)

jimmy bean
04-26-2007, 04:11 PM
I must admit that i don't use my knitted dishcloths to wash dishes either, but i do use them to wipe down the counters and such. Plus, i just love being able to knit something that i can use - i've got enough scarves to fill an art gallery! I usually use the Rowan Handknit Cotton DK -there are some gorgeous colors!

DQ
04-26-2007, 04:15 PM
I've just finished my first dishcloth! :cheering: I think I'll use it to wipe the counters with too, I like to use a sponge (the ones with a scratchy side) for the dishes.

Susan P.
04-26-2007, 09:14 PM
Be aware! I bought a dish cleaner that had a sponge on one side and a promised 'non scratch' scourer on the other. I had had someone on the stove spatter my grill (like a george foreman's but a different brand) and left it for a couple of days and then found it hard to get off. I turned the sponge over to use the non-scratch and it took all the dots off (when you point the dial to). Doesn't matter to me as such as I know where I want the dial to be but goes to show how wary you must be!

of troy
04-26-2007, 11:14 PM
"spa" washcloths are always wonderful gifts.

Kitchen/craft cotton ones are nice, chenille ones, super! you can knit body puffs too (for liquid soaps) and when paired with hand made soaps or creams, (made yourself or bought) they make wonderful luxery gifts.

personally, i only knit wash(face) clothes.. i never use them for dishes.

(i have knit potholder and placemats, and hot pads.. but not dishrags!)

OffJumpsJack
06-17-2009, 10:35 AM
thanks!

one is knitted "landscape" (25 inches long row, and about 20 inches of them) the other is knit "portrait" 20 inch long rows, and 26 inches of them.

you could make them larger (or smaller) depending on your stash (and stamina! )

Ahh..you're using the word processing perspective? :-) I first thought you were being very poetic but I love the analogy! :hug:

Ah, painting and photography came long before the word processor. Landscape as in a wide sky line with less height. Portrait as in more height for the subject and less width (people to tend to stand or sit upright after all). ;)

The word processor designers stole borrowed the terms from the earlier artists and craftsmen.

Dishcloths and Washcloths:

Heat is what kills the bacteria and germs that cause odor. Microwave the damp cloths (it is the water that absorbs the microwave energy and causes the heating)
OR
After the washer, toss them in the dryer on hot.
OR
Steam iron! Cotton will take the steam iron while synthetics can't take that heat.
OR
If you are camping I suppose you could boil the cloths in a pan of water to sterilize them... Just watch you DH or teenagers!
(Hey, what's cooking. Is that for lunch?) :roflhard:

Cotton vs. synthetics? It depends on the use. Your pots and pans don't care about the feel of cotton but the synthetics are better scrubbers.

Synthetics don't hold as much water, so they dry faster and deter germ growth (less smell). That is why the scrubber sponges have the scratch synthetic side. (In truth the sponge is likely synthetic also).

Cottons are better at picking up the spills.

Microfiber I would suspect to be better than cotton at holding more liquids with out drips (more like a shammy or chamois cloth is my guess).

Cottons better feel for shower and bath use.

Make your self a set of seven or more. Use one a day and wash with towels.

Doilies for dishes?

Funny but my dear wife does this the other way around. I make her dishcloths that match the color of her kitchen and she wants to keep them for doilies as she thinks they are too pretty to scrub dishes with them. :roll:

--Jack (flattered and frustrated about dishcloths)

P.S. Use acrylic and double strand on large needles for a perfect car wash rag. Open stitches rinse easier and cleaner.

My current project:
A Round, Short-Rows Dishcloth (http://www.mielkesfarm.com/dishclth.htm) made with short rows and using YO increases and knit bind off.

Next project:
A Dishcloth Duo (http://tankhouse.knitability.com/freepatterns/DishClothDuo.pdf) from Knitability.com (http://www.knitability.com) I think I have a cotton ball and an acrylic skein that are a reasonable match in color to form a dual purpose set.

Quiltlady
06-20-2009, 06:41 PM
Eeeeeeeeeee I hate smelly washcloths!

I have to admit that I have NO interest in knitting dish cloths. I don't want any MORE things to be wash and dry. I'd rather spend my yarn money and knitting time on knitting much more beautiful things.:knitting: :knitting:

stitchabit
06-20-2009, 10:53 PM
I love knitting dishcloths. I have several patterns now for ones with a ladybug, butterfly, duckling, sailboat, spring thems - flowers, christmas themes, thanksgiving etc. and babies by krisknits - i knit a set for my twin gc to use for bath time. They are quick and fun.
I use cotton. I use my dishcloths for wiping counters. I change them out daily and also wash them in the washer.

saracidaltendencies
06-20-2009, 11:32 PM
I have knitted and crocheted a bunch of dishcloths...I used to give them away to family all the time but I've been making some for myself because we go through dishcloths so quickly! I prefer using a cotton yarn for cleaning counters and the table, you can wring out the cotton better than the acrylic, so your cleaner or water will dry on the surface faster...However, I really like the acrylic for washing dishes because it's kind of rough and really helps wash off stubborn food spots.

I wash mine in the washing machine and in between washings, I put them (same goes for sponges) in the microwave for 2 minutes to kill bacteria. Just be sure, if you use the microwave method for killing bacteria, you leave the cloth (or sponge) damp. After the microwave, I sometimes also soak them in bleach water to make extra sure the bacteria is killed...lol...Overkill?

But yeah, I enjoy making them, they're quick, easy, and a great way to try out new stitch patterns!

gulfcoastgal
06-21-2009, 01:19 AM
My knitted ones far outlast the store bought and I have bought the top of the line from Dillards Macy's and Foleys and over time terry and velor washcloths fluff away out the dryer lint tube as do dishcloths-even from upscale dept stores
My hand knit cloths are coming up n 5 years old and are thick and brightly colored and still look new ( mercerized worsted cotton) and even my non-mercerized (Cotton Tots) still are thick and soft and look nice I never had a storebought dishcloth or a washcloth look good or last for 5 years so....
#1 economical It lasts longer
#2 Beauty The colors stay bright and true when one spends the money on worsted mercerized cotton My friends cloths are 10 yrs old and still look good If you buy the cheapest cotton- it will not be worth it
#3 knitting household items is green You are building a group of things that willlast years Linen lasts generations WHen did you ever see a wool coat 3 generations old One stain and it is done
a stain on cotton means time in the laundry and it is fine and ready to go again looking new I have cotton items from my grandmothers kitchen from the 60's that look great
just something to think about when we are trying to be a bit more green

Nanaof6
06-21-2009, 07:51 PM
Susan P, The dishcloth was the very first thing my LYS instructor taught me to knit , it was fast and easy and you felt a sense of accomplishment when you were finished knitting it. I remember showing it to my DH with pride, like "Looky what I did in class today!!!" He just looked at it and said hummm, so you made a dishrag! But I was proud of my very first knitted project.

There nice and quick to knit up for a baby shower, or make a few and add to a get well basket with some nice bath salts or add to a new homeowner basket set.

TEMA
06-22-2009, 10:44 PM
I used to knit washcloths all the time but not any more. Now I just look for them at yard sales and secondhand stores where I can buy them for about a buck a piece.
They are just wonderful for cleanup. They are made of cotton but not the really good stuff. The stuff I used was more like string than anything but it did the job.
The other thing is you can usually find the pattern for a washcloth on the inside of the wrapper so they are good things to start knitting with.
TEMA:knitting:

luvmykid28
06-26-2009, 12:35 AM
I started knitting dishcloths cause I wanted something that I could take along and work while sitting at swimming lessons or at the park. I'm currently using Grandmas Favorite dish cloth pattern. It's so easy. I can make 1 in about 45 minutes. I will build my collection, then maybe I'll make them for gifts. I offered my SIL dishcloths, but she said she could never use something so pretty that took my time to knit. I tried to explain that I wanted them to be used. But she didn't want to listen. So I make them for me. I will also be making them from stitch pattern swatches. I use 100% cotton and I don't actually "do the dishes" with them, but I wipe the counters with them. i have a scrub brush for the dishes and a dishwasher...I will also make them for the shower.

PamJ
06-26-2009, 10:49 AM
It's funny how some are reluctant to use knit dishcloths. When I first started making them years ago, a woman actually framed one I made for her. It was so embarrassing! After trying many patterns, I now stick to Grandma's Favorite. I love the way the diagonal pattern "acts," for lack of a better word. And like you said, it's a quick, non-stressful project. I can't imagine using anything else now.

Until I read this thread, I didn't realize I mostly use them for wiping down counters and sinks too. I always used a scrub sponge on dishes before loading them in the dishwasher and to do pans by hand. Now I'm making the knit scrubbies for that, following the hints in the FO Scrubbie thread, and they are wonderful.

princessmomma
06-26-2009, 12:40 PM
I started by making a few washcloths for my new baby and as baby gifts. Then my girls each picked their own colors and pattern because they wanted their own washcloths for bathtime too. Now I'm trying to choose a pattern so I can make myself a collection to use in the kitchen.

Liz 14
06-28-2009, 11:56 AM
They certainly last longer than shop bought cloths and you can knit them in colours to match your kitchen or bathroom.They are so easy to keep clean and wash through in the washing machine.would never go back to the old shop ones again.