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humblestumble
04-25-2007, 02:38 AM
How do you people know which books to read?! There are SO many! It's been soo so long since I've read a ficitonal book that I've chosen that I don't know where to begin. I read a lot of them in high school and enjoyed them, but now what? And I read all the time as a child. (like 20-40 books a year, haha)

Anyway. I am just shy of finishing Knitting Under the Influence. I have to say that I found it really good. It was almost awesome. I've read it now for about 3 days and will be done sometime tonight.

I guess my problem is that I never know if I will like a book or if recommendations and opinions will be to my liking. I'm pretty picky about everything.

So, I am an avid fan of the library now. Where should I start?!

I like Mystery, Humor and well-written books.

I really want to read new books, something refreshing and current-ish. like 5-10 years old. I just don't know where to start. So really, I don't even know if I am asking for recommendations, but rather how do YOU know what book to choose to read?

HeatherFeather
04-25-2007, 03:44 AM
I LOVE Dianna Gabaldon's books...Outlander is the first one!!!!!!!!!!

Amazing totally and compeletly!!!!

At Home in Mitford by Jan Karon: Confirmed bachelor Episcopal priest and his goings on...SWEET SWEET story!!!!

Ok, I've got a list...
http://librariansbooklist.blogspot.com/ I did this last summer some of my favorite books are on there. I wanted people to write reviews of books and post it on there, but it didn't happen....but my fav's are on there. :)

RiverDaughter
04-25-2007, 03:54 AM
I usually just have friend pressing books on me at every turn. It's hilarious the amount of reading I need to get done. :roflhard:

A good comedy: Good Omens. I think Terry Pratchet was one of the authors, I can't remember. It's a great comedy, as is anything by Terry Pratchet, and well worth the read.

Redlesley
04-25-2007, 04:11 AM
Marion Keyes is a good humour writer. I love Jodi Piccoult for the subjects she tackles. Jeffrey Deaver and Patricia Cornwell as I adore crime and forensics.
I then usually see what's on best seller lists but don't always get what's recent - many recommended books I've found boring (like Cold Mountain - URGH!)
I also look at special offers so if I can get 3 for the price of 2, I'll usually take a 'risk' on a new author or book I like the blurb on - that way, if I don't like it, at least I haven't spent loads!

HamburgKnitter
04-25-2007, 04:20 AM
Even if you don't buy from Amazon and borrow your books from the library, there is one great Amazon feature: "Customers who bought this item also bought ......".

When I read a book that I really like, I look at the Amazon description and follow the above link. You'd be surprised how well it works. I've discovered a ton of authors by taking a risk and ordering their books because I followed the Amazon link of what others have ordered, read the synopsis and reviews of the book and got intrigued.

My book recommendation: The Time Traveler's Wife. An amazing story!

DQ
04-25-2007, 05:59 AM
I stumbled across this site once --> http://www.whichbook.net/default.aspx?searchtype=1&reset=1

I don't know how well it works though :shrug:

TeenKnitter
04-25-2007, 06:33 AM
I don't know if you like historical fantasy, but Juliet Marillier is and AMAZING author (in my opinion). While her books are a bit fantastical, they're not so out-there as to be unbelievable and are primarily based off of celtic folklore. They're adult level reading books, and I would recommend starting with her book Daughter of the Forest, it is the first in a trilogy.

Nobones
04-25-2007, 06:48 AM
I recommend reading ' Jane Eyre'. I :heart: it. It's so well written. I read it every year along with 'Little Women' and 'Good wives'. If you want something a bit more unusal, 'Neverwhere' by Neil Gamen is a good one.

traceleighj
04-25-2007, 07:30 AM
Oh one of my favorite subjects!

I work part time at a book store and I am always finding new things to read from co-workers as well as customers!

Try, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time" by Mark Haddon. It is a great book and and easy enjoyable read about an autistic boy who solves a mystery.

Also, try "Snow Flower and the Secret Fan" by Lisa See. This is a historical fiction book set in China about a girl who has an arranged friendship with another girl and what happens as they grow up. Well written and a very quick read- I got so into it, it didn't last long!

Enjoy!
Tracie

losnana
04-25-2007, 08:09 AM
[quote="HeatherFeather"]I LOVE Dianna Gabaldon's books...Outlander is the first one!!!!!!!!!!

I agree! I've read the series a couple of times, when new bookks come out. I'm starting all over soon, because I received the latest one LAST Christmas, but waited until I was anxious to read all of them again. I highly recommend these.

Yarnlady
04-25-2007, 08:18 AM
J.K. Rowlings-Harry Potter, Diana Gabaldon-Jamie & Claire, James Patterson-Alex Cross, Patricia Cornwall-Kay Scarpetta, Liliian Jackson Braun-The Cat Who...., Anne George-the Southern Sisters, Nora Roberts-Misc, Kathy Reichs-Temperance Brennan, Jim Bishop-Harry Dresden

larudden
04-25-2007, 08:23 AM
I love books! For the longest time, I was into "happy ending" romance. Just gotta love a happy ending.

I just read Mary Higgins Clark's "Two Little Girls in Blue." Nice read.

Women's fiction has gotten ahold of me these days. "The Knitting Circle" by Ann Hood was a GREAT book. And, of course, I loved the knitting aspect of it.

"Family Tree" by Barbara Dalinski was awesome as well.

I read People magazine and always check out the book section. If one looks good, I go to my library's site and request it. Sometimes, you have to wait a while, but at least it saves me from running around trying to find it or having to buy a hardcover.

Jodi Picoult is the BOMB!

Let's see:

The Mermaid Chair
Anything by Jennifer Chiaverini
Anything by Eileen Goudge

Gosh, I could go on. Maybe we should have a list somewhere, huh?

Blessings,
Leslie

psammeadred
04-25-2007, 08:43 AM
Have you read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy books by Douglas Adams? Those are a riot.

If you haven't read the Chronicles of Narnia, those are great for any age level, as are Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels.

Susan P.
04-25-2007, 09:04 AM
I read almost exclusively British murder mystery style books and I like the ones set in historic times. Agatha Christie is still of course one of the shining lights but Peter Ellis and Brother Cadfeal books are great as is Peter Tremayne and the Sister Fidelma books because they offer such great insights into the Brehon law system (ancient Irish) which has a lot going for it!

debinoz
04-25-2007, 09:20 AM
Janet Evanovich- Stephanie Plum series

Tamar Myers- Magdalena Yoder series

Jill Churchill- Jane Jeffry series

Nancy Atherton- Aunt Demity series

Donna Andrews- Meg Langslow series

I have more, but those are the ones that pop to mind first. They are all mystery/humor.

I used to belong to the mystery guild before I took up knitting. Knitting is definitely cheaper considering I can almost read a book a day and it takes me forever to knit something! :teehee:

tab
04-25-2007, 09:26 AM
A good comedy: Good Omens. I think Terry Pratchet was one of the authors, I can't remember. It's a great comedy, as is anything by Terry Pratchet, and well worth the read.
Terry Pratchett and Neil Gaiman collaborated on that one, and I have to second the recommendation on both the book and the authors. The entire Discworld series is hilarious, and both Neverwhere and American Gods have this perfect balance of captivating drama and humour.

marykz
04-25-2007, 09:41 AM
Ask a librarian!!! They often have a section of the newest popular books, bestseller books etc. they can also help you find books similar to ones you have liked in the past, or point you towards totally new areas. Our library is great- very helpful people there and it is very friendly.

Nobones
04-25-2007, 09:51 AM
My Husband loves the 'Neverwhere' book. He usually only reads factual books, but a friend gave this to him and he couldn't put it down.

Vendie
04-25-2007, 10:11 AM
Ask a librarian!!! They often have a section of the newest popular books, bestseller books etc. they can also help you find books similar to ones you have liked in the past, or point you towards totally new areas. Our library is great- very helpful people there and it is very friendly.

I was waiting for someone to say this. As a librarian, I cannot stress this enough. Check out your library's website to see if they have recommendations listed. Maybe they will have book lists or displays to tempt you within the library. Ask your friendly librarians - we love to help people find new books and new authors. Or do the Amazon thing and instead of buying the book, check the library's catalog to see if they have it. Newer items to circulate more, so you might have to get on the hold list, but it's still an option.

Abbily
04-25-2007, 10:12 AM
Susan P. (and anyone else who likes British mysteries) have you read Elizabeth George? And P.D. James? And Ruth Rendell? They are all FABULOUS authors of British mysteries! :)

auburnchick
04-25-2007, 10:20 AM
I like to read the book reviews in various magazines. Once I've read a favorite author's books, I'm often left feeling lost. I like to walk through a bookstore and look at the newest books. Then I'll go online to my library's website and see if the books are available.

Something I like to do at the library is see what books they have sitting on top of the shelves (on display). These books are rotated often and are often books that I wouldn't have given a second glance if they were on the shelves.

BostonBecca
04-25-2007, 10:52 AM
When picking a book to read, I either get suggestions from the New York Times Book Review or I go to a bookstore, pick out three to five I think are interesting from the fiction section and then read a paragraph of each from somewhere in the middle of the book on a random page. It hsould be at least twenty lines long. The one I want to keep reading the most right then and there is the one I get. Sometimes I get two, and sometimes I jsut remember that I want one of the rejects as well. It works for me about 9.9 times out of 10.

Leah22b
04-25-2007, 01:00 PM
I'm surprised no one has suggested:

Yarn Harlot: The Secret Life of a Knitter
or Also by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much

These are both really funny and have a little to do with knitting as well...lol

I'm one of those people who look at the title and artwork before picking up a book. If I see something I like between those 2 things then I'll pick it up and read some of the back cover,but if I don't like the cover or title its a no go. Unfortunatly it's probably kept me from reading several good books, but I've only ever gotten a few I haven't liked.

orcoastknitter
04-25-2007, 01:25 PM
I love Janet Evanovich (as well as the books she co-writes with Charlotte Hughes). I also like Sophie Kinsella, Mary Higgins Clark, Tom Patterson, Lisa Scottoline, Patricia Cornwell, Susan Andersen, Suzann Ledbetter (I don't know if she is still in print or not). I haven't read in a while but I make it a point to pick up the newest Janet and Mary Higgins Clark book when they come out.

Sanibelle
04-25-2007, 03:47 PM
Have you ever read Debbie Macomber? She has written a ton of books but she has one series that she combines with knitting. The first book in the series is called "A Shop on Blossom Street", next was a "A Good Yarn" and yesterday the latest in the series came out - "Back to Blossom Street".

It is a book about a woman that opens a yarn store in Seattle and follows her life and some of her customers. I loved the first 2 books and as soon as I got home last night I went to B&N to get the third book - it is great so far too.

As far as mysteries I love the ABC series by Sue Grafton. She has the same character in her books - Kinsey Millone. Her first book was A is for Alibi, then B is for Burglar, etc... I think she is now up to T so if you like a great series these are wonderful.

Another mystery writer that I love is Donna Leon. She is an American that lives in Venice and all her books take place there. Last year when I was in Venice I went to a lot of the places she talks about in the books - it was so much fun.

I love to read - if I don't have a set of knitting needles in my hands then for sure I have a book!

Lynn

SabrinaJL
04-25-2007, 04:50 PM
I have to third Good Omens. I'm a huge Neil Gaiman fan. When I was dropping my hubby off at the airport, I went in and picked up two copies of Good Omens. He's not a reader, but I told him to read it anyways, that way we'd be reading it together and could discuss it over the phone. He loved it so much he wanted to read more Terry Pratchett. Of course, I wanted to encourage him to read, so I sent him 15 Terry Pratchett books. :roflhard:

I also agree with Jodi Picoult. I've been reading her books and I really enjoy them. I told my mom she HAD to read My Sister's Keeper and gave her the book. Today when we were at lunch she says "Are you TRYING to make me cry with that book?"

I liked the Outlander books too, but I could never finish The Fiery Cross for some reason.

Hildegard_von_Knittin
04-25-2007, 06:56 PM
I've got to agree on Diana Gabaldon; her books are :eyes: MEZMERIZING :eyes: (and pretty :eyebrow: too)

I like historical fiction: right now I'm into Philippa Gregory (Diana Gabaldon is historical fiction too). John Grishom is always a favorite, and if you want lots of :eyebrow: Janet Evanovich and Judith McNaught are my favs.

I like books that are a series, or family legacy. The Thorn Birds is a FABULOUS book, if you've seen the movie and not read the book, you're really missing out (even though the movie is pretty good, there are key parts missing). Colleen McCaullough's other books are all great too. ANNNND, I really like Margaret Atwood; she wrote The Handmaid's Tale, but also has several others (I've only read one, but it was great).

My two favorite books of all time are A Tree Grows in Brooklyn and Alice in Wonderland. I have at lest 7 copies of Alice, some abridged, some not, some annotated, some ith different artists interpretations, some that are loosely based on Lewis Carrol's story.

lostchyld
04-25-2007, 07:19 PM
I'm really curious why everyone seems to like Good Omens. That's one of the first books anyone recommends and I really don't get it. I actually felt a lot like I was eavesdropping on a private conversation when I read it. I just felt it was lacking in a lot of ways.

I'll second any recommendations for Neverwhere, though. That was really good, if mildly confusing.

iza
04-25-2007, 07:24 PM
I love that thread, it gives ME a lot of ideas :teehee:

I love Margaret Atwood too, I really liked Cat's Eye and I want to read The Handmaid's Tale.

Vendie
04-25-2007, 09:51 PM
Looooove Margaret Atwood. I'm listening to The Blind Assassin right now (not my favorite, but ok). Alias Grace is my favorite Atwood book so far.

BostonBecca
04-25-2007, 09:56 PM
My favorite author is John Irving. His books are not casual reads however and they are NOT for children as they frequently deal with sex, pornography, drug abuse, and other subjects. They are however, some of the most inventive and well written books I have ever encountered.

humblestumble
04-26-2007, 12:21 AM
Oh one of my favorite subjects!

I work part time at a book store and I am always finding new things to read from co-workers as well as customers!

Try, "The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time" by Mark Haddon. It is a great book and and easy enjoyable read about an autistic boy who solves a mystery.

You know, someone else just recommended this book too and it sounds interesting! Thanks so much for the quick synopsis. I've been hearing SO much about Autism lately. It's interesting.


Have you read The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy books by Douglas Adams? Those are a riot.

If you haven't read the Chronicles of Narnia, those are great for any age level, as are Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels.

I haven't read the THGTG or CON (heard great things), but I have read A Wrinkle in Time and a sequel of it. I liked it when I was younger.

I'm surprised no one has suggested:

Yarn Harlot: The Secret Life of a Knitter
or Also by Stephanie Pearl-McPhee
At Knit's End: Meditations for Women Who Knit Too Much


I actually have At Knit's End. I read it during jury duty. I wouldn't call it a fictional book, but it was a good read. She's funny.

I have heard of Debbie Macomber, but I have yet to pick up a book. Sounds interesting.

I will try to find a synopsis somewhere of Good Omen and Neverwhere. Synopsises (is that a word??) REALLY help me.

I tried reading Harry Potter when it came out, I could NOT get into it. I'm not into the whole HP thing, but it's a great story for kids.

I read a lot of reviews on Amazon.com I lurk there all the time for everything. It's never been hard for me to find a non-fiction book to read, but I guess that's because you know exactly what it's about. A Fiction book is more of a gamble which is why I need to find a book club or a book buddy haha.

It's great hearing how everyone finds what books to read for themselves. That's really the main question I was asking. I also like hearing praises of other authors and books though. Synopsises (word?) help greatly.

Just author's names alone or book titles do NOTHING for me. In all honesty if there's no short sentence of what it's about, I probably won't go looking for it unless everyone suggests it haha.

Thanks again for the info guys, keep it coming! :D :hug: :muah: :cheering: :happydance:

SabrinaJL
04-26-2007, 12:35 AM
Synopses. :) And I can't believe you couldn't get into the Harry Potter books! I bought them for my daughter before she started kindergarten. She was too young for them at the time and not very interested, but I was completely hooked. :teehee:

humblestumble
04-26-2007, 12:57 AM
Thanks for the clarification, Sabrina!

Ya, at first, I was against Harry Potter. I am weird like that. If something is too popular sometimes I am just stubborn and force myself not to like it. Eventually, I tried to open my mind to it, but I just didn't like it. It was not my kind of read. I even watched 2 of the movies and they didn't really appeal to me. And it's funny because I actually like the idea of magic and witchcraft. :shrug: I would get it for my kids, but I personally couldn't get into it.

orcoastknitter
04-26-2007, 01:10 AM
Thanks for the clarification, Sabrina!

Ya, at first, I was against Harry Potter. I am weird like that. If something is too popular sometimes I am just stubborn and force myself not to like it. Eventually, I tried to open my mind to it, but I just didn't like it. It was not my kind of read. I even watched 2 of the movies and they didn't really appeal to me. And it's funny because I actually like the idea of magic and witchcraft. :shrug: I would get it for my kids, but I personally couldn't get into it.

I started reading the first book about 3 or 4 years ago. I only could through the first half. It was struggle just for that. My friend who is a big HP fan asks me from time to time if I ever finished it. I just smile, she laughs it off. I actually have #3 & #5 I think. At the time I thought I would read the series, but it never happened. But I have seen all the movies and own them.

If you like humor, romance and mystery, Janet Evanovich has a series about a female bounty hunter. Here is here website. (http://www.evanovich.com/)

humblestumble
04-26-2007, 01:19 AM
I'm glad I am not the only one! haha. I had a friend in middle school that forced me to read a page just to see if I would like it, I read it and didn't like it. And that was in the middle of the book! So, that's a big 'No' for me when it comes to books. It has to keep my interest on every page.

That series on a female bounty hunter has intrigued me! Thanks for the heads up :D

Aquaria
04-26-2007, 02:07 AM
If you are interested in fantasy, here (http://www.knittinghelp.com/knitting/forum/viewtopic.php?t=30100&highlight=) is a thread with lots of great recommendations from our KH fantasy fans! :wink:

If you haven't read the Chronicles of Narnia, those are great for any age level, as are Madeline L'Engle's A Wrinkle in Time and its sequels.

I second both A Wrinkle in Time and the Chronicles of Narnia! I enjoyed both as a fantasy fiction fan, particularly the Chronicles of Narnia. I know some of my highschool teachers also enjoyed the CON series (the middle-aged ones, too!) , so I think it fits almost all age group readers :thumbsup: .

Enjoy! :)

Ronda
04-26-2007, 08:13 AM
Thanks to this thread, I just requested about 6 books from my library! :teehee:

One question for those of you who frequent your public library, I do all my requesting online. Sometimes titles will come up, but it will say "No copies available," yet the "REQUEST" button is still there. Of course, I requested those titles, but I'm wondering if I'll ever get those titles. I've seen where it says X copies available - due date: XXXXXX, so my guess is that "no copies available" means the library doesn't even own a copy of the book I've requested.

Abbily
04-26-2007, 09:18 AM
I have to 'third' Margaret Atwood, she's one of my favorite authors. I have read all of her novels, and they are all really good. Jane Austen is another of my favorite authors, but you have to like writing from that time period... :)

Ronda- here in Austin if you request a book, your library branch will get it from another branch for you. If the entire Austin library system doesn't own a copy at all, then it won't even come up in the search.

Ronda
04-26-2007, 09:51 AM
Ronda- here in Austin if you request a book, your library branch will get it from another branch for you. If the entire Austin library system doesn't own a copy at all, then it won't even come up in the search.

Thanks! All but one of the books I requested said "no copies available" so your response is good news. :)

humblestumble
04-27-2007, 12:31 AM
Ronda, you can also do what's called "Interlibrary loan." Just go to the main desk of your main library to request copies of books that they don't have. I haven't done it yet, but I will eventually.

Ronda
04-27-2007, 08:05 AM
Thanks for the information, humblestumble!

My problem is that I've either purchased all my books OR my aunt buys and buys and buys and then gives them to my mother. My mother reads them and then gives them to me! I have a very difficult time getting rid of books, so I have several shelves filled with books in my house and several boxes filled with books in my attic. In the last 6 months, I've decided to try borrowing from the library instead. I feel like a library newbie! ;-)

humblestumble
04-28-2007, 12:41 AM
OH I know how you feel! I have a ton of books that I am not willing to part with! Up until this past year, I had really not given the library any thought, but it really is lovely, especially because I don't have a job. :teehee:

brokenblossoms
04-28-2007, 02:58 AM
I looove Mark Twain, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. ^__^

mel.b
04-28-2007, 07:56 AM
For those of you that love Diana Gaboldon (I love her first 4 books but couldn't get into the last two) try Jean M Auel and the Clan of the Cave bear series. This series is probably my favourite ever and I've read them all so many times I've lost count. Sometimes I even pick them up and just read my favourite bits :oops: Don't hold your breath though for the 6th (and possibly 7th book in the series)....there were 15years I think between books 4 - 5 and almost 6 years on from book 5 I'm still waiting for book 6.

Paullina Simons is also great - especially "the Bronze Horseman", a love story set in Russia during the seige of Leningrad in WW2. There are two sequels but the first is my favourite.

A couple of Australian authors I love are Bryce Courtney - particulary 'The Power of One' set in South Africa during aparthid - is about an english boy growing up battling with the Afrikannas at his boarding school and going on to become a hero to the native Africans. Another one of his that I loved and read all in one sitting which ended with me bawling my eyes out is "Jessica" the story of a girl growing up in Outback Australia around the time of WW1 (based very loosly on true events).

Another Australian Author is Matthew Riley - his books are completely action packed and non-stop from the very first sentence. A fun read and he doesn't mind killing off main characters. Try 'Ice Station', 'Area 7', 'The Contest' and 'Temple' to name a few.

Another Australian book is called "Inheriting Jack" - I can't remember the author off the top of my head but it is about a career woman who suddenly inherites her god child after the death of his mother. It makes you laugh and cry...the part where she feeds him only fairy bread is priceless!

Otherwise my reading tastes fall along similar lines to many here - Jeffery Deaver, Patrica Cornwell, Geoffery Archer, wilbur Smith (although can't get into the latest - 'the quest') Jodie Picquot etc.

I love buying books too - I hate waiting for them to come into the library. If you have too many books at home (can you ever?!) or want to get rid of some, donate them to a local nursing home. My mother works at a nursing home and I recently gave her a heap of my books to take to work...the elderly residents really appreciate it.


Mel.b

chiricahuagal
04-28-2007, 01:40 PM
If you like historical fiction, time travel and/or romance, here are my recommendations with synopses:

I second TIME TRAVELER'S WIFE here - it's a story about a man who has a time travel gene that whisks him into the past and the future without his being able to control it, and his wife. It's told in a series of dated journal-like entries by him and by her - it's a great love story and also an interesting treatment of a time travel theory. It's set in our time, and he usually travels within the time period of his own lifetime, just a few years back and forth, and often within his own geographic area, visiting his own past and future lives. What would you do if you went back to your past, or forward in your own life and saw yourself, or your loved ones? What if you found out you may have saved your own life with this ability? Would you try to change past events if you knew the future? I just loved the story so much I had to read more time travel books, which led me to:

the OUTLANDER SERIES which several people have mentioned. These are each BIG BOOKS - 6 in the series so far. It's also time-travel related, but the heroine travels 200 years in the past, using a different time travel convention (and different theory than Time Traveler's Wife). The author Diana Gabaldon is so thorough with her historical details and story elements that you feel you are there, and if you are like a lot of us, all the characters become so real to you that you feel like they are family and friends. The heroine, Claire, inadvertently travels 200 years into the past, in the exact same location she is standing, and is forced into a marriage with a man in the past in order to save her own life. She attempts to go back, but develops such a strong feeling for this man and all the people in the past that it's hard for her to want to travel back to her own time and her husband that she loved so much in the future. Even giving that much of a synopsis gives away so much - the genre of this book could be romance+ historical fiction+ fantasy/sci-fi+ drama - well, it's unclassifiable really!

I had not been a big fan of audio books before this, but I read a review where someone mentioned that hearing the audio version of Outlander brought so many more details to light, that I joined audible.com, bought an iPod and got Outlander (unabridged) - wow - that reviewer was so right!! I have a tendency to skim in parts, especially if there is a tense moment and I'm anxious to discover the outcome. The good news is - knitting while listening to an audiobook is about the most perfect thing you can do!!

I'm planning on getting Time Traveler's Wife in audio soon too - I sampled both the unabridged and the abridged versions on audible.com, and I loved both narrators' treatments! But I plan to get unabridged because I want every single word.

I'm also listening to the entire unabridged Lord of the Ring series on my ipod - that was a gift on CD to my DH from a friend a year ago, so since we already owned it, I loaded it on and wear the ipod while knitting or cleaning the house or watering in the garden. I'm enjoying it immensely - the narrator sings a lot, and his accents are wonderful. However, I'm missing the romantic element that I like - you know, the whole boy-meets-girl thing. Aragorn and Arwen aren't given enough treatment in this, in my opinion.

One more book I recommend, for historical fiction fans, is KING HEREAFTER by Dorothy Gunnet, about MacBeth. Although her writing style was incredibly difficult to get into, and my background on this time (around 1040) is really lacking, by the time I got about half way in, I was completely hooked (although still confused). It's an interesting theory about the kings of Scotland that she was actually researching as fact but decided to make it a novel and publish it as fiction, so the historical details are rich and true. There's an element of romance, as well. I plan to read it again hoping that it will make more sense. Her theory is that Thorfinn and MacBeth are the same person, not cousins - and she follows Thorfinn from a boy in the care of his foster father through his rise to power and king as MacBeth, and then his downfall. Yeah, there's some boy-meets-girl action in it too. Boy-slays-girl's-husband-and-takes-her kinda stuff that those barbarians resorted to back in those days... (and yet, you still love him)

Up to about 2 years ago, all I ever read was magazines and the occasional book. Now I'm going through several books a month. It's almost as addictive as knitting.

HollyP
05-10-2007, 12:50 AM
Since this post first started I have picked up quite a few of the books listed. All of them have been great!!

A couple of authors I like that I haven't seen mention are:
Cecelia Ahern - Ps I love you- about a widow whose husband wrote letters for each month of the year with a list of things to do after he died.
Rosie Dunn is about a 30 or so year friendship between a girl and boy, it was told all through letters they wrote to each other and there families.
Another author I have liked is Meg Cabot she wrote the Princess Diaries which I have not read but I have read Size 12 is not fat, Every Boys Got One, The Boy Nextstore, Queen of Babble, Size 14 is not fat either. I enjoyed all of them!

SimplyKaar
05-10-2007, 03:54 AM
I love this thread!! Some of the books/authors mentioned, I already knew (I'm also a big fan of Diana Gabaldon :heart: ) but so many more I had never heard of so I'm taking notes for my next trip to the library.

I've always been a buy-the-book type of girl but I noticed that most of the books I only read once, or maybe twice at most, and then they just sit on my shelves gathering dust.
I don't have the money to keep doing that so I've decided I'll first try to find a particular book at the library, read it and either buy or put it on a birthday/christmas/sinterklaas etc. wishlist when I decide it is good enough to have earned its place on my bookshelves :)

Unlike the USA, from what I've heard anyway, the library memberships here aren't free. It costs me about 35 dollars a year to be a member but this year I lucked out and got a free membership because I was one of the first people visiting the library after it redecorated and I plan to get full use out of it.
Now I just hope they'll have a decent selection of foreign books since I prefer to read books in the non translated, original form.

Ronda
05-10-2007, 12:10 PM
Whoever recommended The Knitting Circle by Ann Hood - omg. What a book. I was reading it last night and crying at the same time. :waah:

KnitClickChick
05-10-2007, 07:55 PM
If you like historical fiction, Phillipa Gregory is for you. She writes about Queen Elizabeth, Katherine of Aragon, Anne Boleyn.... all of her books are about England several hundred years ago. I am totally hooked on her books -- I just got the Boleyn Inheritance and can't wait to get in to it.

Kathleen O'Neal Gear and W. Michael Gear are archaeologists who write awesome books about the Native American culture. Some of the books are People of the Lakes, People of the Owl, People of the Lightening.

I also HIGHLY recommend Three Weeks With My Brother by Nicholas Sparks. It isn't fiction, but it is really good. It is about his life growing up, and a trip he makes with his brother to see the world. That man has had a lot of issues in his life -- the book is really moving. I was reading on the bus and started bawling my eyes out!!

Yvonne
05-10-2007, 08:09 PM
All of you readers, go the library right now and take out every book they have by Elizabeth Berg!!
My other favorites:

Debbie Macomber
Janet Evanovich
Anita Shreve
Ruth Rendell
Kathy Reichs
Tami Hoag
Steven King

anything about knitting

threesmom
05-10-2007, 09:47 PM
There are so many books I want to read after looking at this thread! And since I sometimes can't decide if I would rather read or knit since I like them equally well, I'll through in my .02

I third - or fourth - the Time Traveler's Wife - I don't normally do fantasy/sci-fi, but this is just such an awesome story - incredibly well written, and the characters just stay with you. I still haven't shelved it away, and I finished months ago. Donna Tartt's(sp?) Little Friend and her other one - can't remember the title, where both good too. I just finished Chris Bonjalin's new one The Double Bind - I had a hard time putting it down. Jodi Picoult's are normally good, and for historical fiction, I like Tracy Chevalier. So many good books, so little time. What I wouldn't give for a nice rainy day, a cup of tea, soft blanket, and lots of time to read or knit .... How come moms don't get to take sick days??? :thinking:

KathyinCali
05-15-2007, 02:34 PM
I just finished The Pilots Wife by Anita Shreve (I'm always behind in reading the most current books) and loved it.

Lots of great recommendations. Thanks for this thread!