PDA

View Full Version : Allergic to Wheat Gluten?


bailsmom
05-18-2007, 03:37 PM
My story is kind of long and boring so I'll try to sum it up as best I can. The past 8 weeks I've been suffering from Hives. Terrible hives. I've seen my allergist twice and went to my reg doctor last wednesday and he put me on a stronger dose of prednisone than did my allergist. I am on it for 10 days. I had asked my doctor if he thought maybe I had developed an allergy to wheat or oats. I eat quite a bit of both. But I have been eating them for quite a while with no reactions up until I started taking some other medication just prior to this outbreak.

Now I've been told that this particular med. can stay in my system for up to 8 weeks and I've also been told that it can't. I would tell you the name of the drug, but I don't want to get into it now. Suffice it to say my doctor thinks it can.

I'm leaning more towards the wheat because I had 2 pieces of wheat toast for breakfast and 2 granola bars and 1 pretzle. This was yesterday all during the day. I woke up this morning with probably the worst I have ever had it.

Hows that for summing it up!! So I've decided to investigate this potential allergy to wheat and oats. My main question is this: Does anyone else suffer from this?? If so, what happens to you physically? And do they sell gluten free bread??? I can't imagine they do, but I'm sure they do somewhere.

I appreciate any help you can give.

Knitting_Guy
05-18-2007, 04:06 PM
Yes they do make gluten free breads. Check out your local health food stores.

I'm not allergic but do suffer from IBS and wheat gluten is a trigger. I try to avoid it as much as possible.

Stiney
05-18-2007, 04:09 PM
They absolutely sell wheat bread! Celiac's disease is becoming more common, or at least better diagnosed, and there are other reasons people avoid. There are also lots of rice-based "carbs" you can eat--rice breads and so on and so forth. Ask at your local grocery store, and then check the health store like Mason said--grocery store'd be cheaper, and they might have it, depending on where you live.

:hug: Good luck, whether it's your meds or the wheat.

marykz
05-18-2007, 04:20 PM
There are tons of wheat free products available. New FDA labeling guidelines are requiring many types of food to be labeled as containing wheat or "wheat free" or "gluten free" which is really what you want to look for.

Look up celiac sprue on reputable health websites (like NIH.gov, or other non-advertizing sites) it is all about gluten intolerance (another couple terms to use for research.)

A word of caution- to make up for the gluten in foods, many of them are VERY high in salt and fat. Just read the labels. you may have to try SEVERAL different brands before you find ones you like.

I've known several people who are gluten intolerant and they say they'd rather NOT eat bread than eat the gluten free-kind, but you should try for yourself.

There are a couple grocery services that specialize in special diet foods. my friend orders from them as she doesn't have a decent store near by that carries gluten free products.

If it is a gluten intolerance there are a few test you might have to do to confirm it- but the way to treat it is the lifestyle change of eliminating wheat and gluten. gluten can hide in the strangest places- so reading labels will be your best defense...

Now that my friend has eliminated gluten, she's feeling better, and her whole family has gotten used to it. It took a couple MONTHS of eliminating gluten-containing foods before she really saw an effect, but its no longer a big deal for her. hang in there!

Kaydee
05-18-2007, 04:20 PM
I don't have this allergy or know much about it. I do have a neighbor who is alergic to wheat and gluten, and its a very serious allergy for her. You should ask your doc about getting tested for the allergy. Also, I found this (http://www.gilliansfoods.com/) site you might want to look at. It does look like there are gluten free options for you out there.

bailsmom
05-18-2007, 05:08 PM
I don't have this allergy or know much about it. I do have a neighbor who is alergic to wheat and gluten, and its a very serious allergy for her. You should ask your doc about getting tested for the allergy. Also, I found this (http://www.gilliansfoods.com/) site you might want to look at. It does look like there are gluten free options for you out there.


Thanks for that website. I'll take any info I can get. I hope to god it isn't wheat or oats, but I have this feeling in my gut that it is, and my gut isn't usually wrong. :pout:

MoniDew
05-18-2007, 11:57 PM
As a nutritionist/naturopath I can tell you that not only is gluten sensitivity not rare, but it is growing segment of the population. And yes, a round of antibiotics is enough to wipe out the digestive flora and make digestion nearly impossible for a few weeks. During that time, damage to the mucusal lining of the GI tract can occur, and that damage will take time to heal. Once damaged, protein structures like gluten and casein (found in dairy products) can and do become very problematic.

Some people, as is the case in Celiac disease, develop autoimmune disorders and must permenantly remove gluten from the diet. In other cases, it's just temporary.

As the manager of a healthfood store I can tell you that we exist to carry alternatives for people who cannot buy their food in a regular grocery store. Conventional grocery stores do not understand the need for alternative products, often do not carry the correct products, and the staff does not have enough knowledge to walk a newly diagnosed person through the process.

CHECK OUT YOUR LOCAL HEALTHFOOD STORE. The staff will be well educated in this topic.

AND VISIT A NUTRITIONIST OR NATUROPATH, not a medical doctor or dietitian. They are not trained for this! When a condition is doctor-caused (by antibiotics, in this case,) the medical establishment is not going to admit there IS a problem, much less be trained in what to do about it!
________
FORD CONSUL (http://www.ford-wiki.com/wiki/Ford_Consul)

AnnaT
05-19-2007, 04:25 AM
AND VISIT A NUTRITIONIST OR NATUROPATH, not a medical doctor or dietitian. They are not trained for this! When a condition is doctor-caused (by antibiotics, in this case,) the medical establishment is not going to admit there IS a problem, much less be trained in what to do about it!


I can't agree that this is the right path for everyone with digestive disorders. Some of them can be quite serious with acute episodes. My own mother has Crohn's, and she has needed hospitalization more than once for it on an emergency basis. Anyone familiar with Crohn's knows that sometimes you can get a sudden flareup no matter what you do or how careful you are. A nutritionist would not have been much help in her case.

AnnaT
05-19-2007, 04:30 AM
My story is kind of long and boring so I'll try to sum it up as best I can. The past 8 weeks I've been suffering from Hives. Terrible hives. I've seen my allergist twice and went to my reg doctor last wednesday and he put me on a stronger dose of prednisone than did my allergist. I am on it for 10 days. I had asked my doctor if he thought maybe I had developed an allergy to wheat or oats. I eat quite a bit of both. But I have been eating them for quite a while with no reactions up until I started taking some other medication just prior to this outbreak.


Is anything else different in your life in the last 8 weeks--new foods, severe stress, etc.? Could the other medication be causing the hives? You could try cutting out all grain products and see what happens.

Susan P.
05-19-2007, 04:36 AM
Ensure you get the best advice possible about the issue and a sound product check list as even cornflour products are often unsuitable for people who need gluten free. It is amazing just how many products - even rice based products - wind up having wheat based components in them. Rice flour is generally great to use instead of wheat flour by the way but you then need to check each and every additional element you add (like raising agents and so on) if the sensitivity is high.

I do know these days there are some great gluten free cereals in supermarkets and even gluten free biscuits in their specialist section.

I also tend to agree with AnnaT. I guess it depends on medical culture and where you live etc but these days I think most GP's and certainly dieticians are very knowledgeable and certainly many conditions DO require medical expertise. Certainly many of these conditions can be readily misdiagnosed and/or people without medical knowledge *may* not recognise that an individual needs to seek medical help quickly when presenting. If in doubt ask a GP ask if they can tell you where to obtain a list of gluten free products. Such a simple request tends to demonstrate whether that person is in the 'know' or not.

I see more and more nurses and western medical practitioners these days rolling extra training into naturopathy, chinese traditional medicine etc and combining approaches and I think that great.

Susan P.
05-19-2007, 04:45 AM
bailsmom..by the way, you can have a series of allergy tests organised through your doctor by the way. They simply scratch your skin and put small amounts of various product against this and weals will form where you are allergic. Obviously something in the digestive system operates differently but this is a painless, quick way of identifying major allergy triggers.

Your suggestion re an elimination type diet can be good but you really need to regulate that very very closely and it may be better to have someone with expertise help you on that. Sometimes people can suddenly drop items out of their diet and become ill just because a trigger has suddenly been removed and the body is reacting to that change.

I can't quite recall but I think I read once that you need to remove suspect products for something like 7-10 days and then slowly introduce one at a time and check the result but like I said, elimination alone can make you ill for a few days so you need to consider that in the plan.

Expert help and advice sounds the way to go. However, in terms of hives, you need to consider anything else that altered in your life around that time e.g. suddenly wearing a new shirt or blouse (material allergy), suddenly using either a new clothes detergent OR the one you always used suddenly has a new additive you weren't aware of, a partner using a new scent, a pet you come in contact with being washed in something new, your car seats being cleaned or public transport seats used everyday having been sprayed with something new etc.

I'm not quite sure why prednisone is being used for a skin allergy and I think that in itself may need review.

bailsmom
05-19-2007, 12:19 PM
Thanks everyone for your input on this issue. As I said earlier in regards to the medication all this hives business started when I started this particular med. BTW, it wasn't an antibiotic either. I stopped taking it almost exactly 8 weeks ago now to the day and that's how long I heard it can stay in your system. I wish I had never taken that stuff.

Don't worry, it was legal!! :roflhard:

That's why I'm so confused as to whether it is the meds or the wheat. I would think if it were the meds I'd be pretty much done with this crap by now and I'm going in the opposite direction. :pout:

We are going to a health food store today to try the gluten free breads and whatever else I can find. I do know it'll take a while to get this all figured out, but I'm really hoping it's the meds. I feel so badly for those who have an actual allergy to wheat. I know I can be tested for a wheat allergy, but wanted to wait it out to see if it's the meds or not. I'd hate to spend all that money on something that it's not. If that makes any sense.

And no, I haven't changed anything else in the past few weeks that I can think of.....I would think if it were an allergy to fabric or detergent that I'd have it all over my body and it's mainly my bum area and the upper part of my legs.:??

Yes, no??

BTW, they use Prednisone for serious allergic reactions to medications. It worked the first time around but then it came back that's why I'm on a stronger and longer dose by a different doctor.

ecb
05-19-2007, 09:11 PM
bailies Mom
if the Hives and rash are just where your underwear touches your kin IM me, I have experienced this and I have a kid
and if you IM me i might be able to guess in ONE GUESS what the medication is
and If I M right it DOES effect how your body responds to things

ecb

nadja la claire
05-19-2007, 10:39 PM
I have a friend that suffers from this. Set up an appointment with your Dr. and let them know that you would like to test for celiac disease or gluten intolerance. A friend of mine has this and man is it a pain in the butt. The bad news is that if you do have it your diet is going to become limited and the gluten-free products tend to be very expensive. The good news is that your special foods can be written off on your taxes as health expenses.

Good Luck

:muah::hug:

Nadja xxx

PS. Do some research and if you think it's celiac get it checked as soon as you can. Celiac can lead to other more serious conditions.

Susan P.
05-19-2007, 10:54 PM
Body chemicals can change by way of medication.
I agree with the posters urging you to seek further medical testing advice on allergy and on the potentials of having had a reaction to the medication. I think you said earlier that the medical practitioner said it could be 8 weeks before you 'vented' the drug from your system completely and I think that reasonably correct. Sounds like ecb may be able to offer particular experience which would be great if on the mark re the medication. At least then you wouldn't necessarily spend a lot of money on gluten free products unless you need them!

newamy
05-19-2007, 11:13 PM
I think hives are very unusual for a wheat allergy. Usually it involves a stomach ailment and fatigue, possibly acne. It is possible for medications to stay in your system for a very long time. Meds are metabolized either by your liver or kidneys but some can deposit in fat and not break down as quickly. I once had an allergic reaction to an antibiotic. I took them for the whole 10 days and was done with the medication, then two days later got the hives and they itched like crazy and were terrible. It was two weeks before they went completlely away and some days were worse than others. And it didn't seem like prednisone was very helpful. It probably did suppress the immune response so they didn't get worse. But allergic reaction hives have to run there course. If a medication was in question I hope you have stopped using it.

bailsmom
05-20-2007, 01:43 AM
bailies Mom
if the Hives and rash are just where your underwear touches your kin IM me, I have experienced this and I have a kid
and if you IM me i might be able to guess in ONE GUESS what the medication is
and If I M right it DOES effect how your body responds to things

ecb


No, unfortunately it's down the back of my legs, my eye swelled up once and my lip swelled up today. It was a bad day again. :pout: It's better now, but now I'm up at 1:30 in the a.m. and have cramps like you wouldn't believe. :pout: I really hate being a girl sometimes.

We hit 2 health food stores and after what we paid for 5 things, I think I may just get tested now. I can't believe how much it cost. They were very nice people, but who can afford to live that way?? I think I'm going to try making my own bread since we have a breadmaker and they have that gluten free bread mix. Can't hurt to try, right??

You all are being so helpful with your suggestions and I just can't express how much it means to me. :heart::heart:

As for the hives being unusual, I sure hope you are right and it's not a wheat allergy but just those darn drugs I took. This is all just so frustrating beyond words. But I found some bread, that's what I eat for breakfast, and yikes! it was $3 for a tiny little loaf. :thud:I don't pay that much for the loaf of wheat bread I'm used to buying! I get a whole loaf for just under $2.00. Please pray this goes away. I have enough ailments as it is without having to add this to the bunch.

rennfamily
05-20-2007, 08:09 AM
I have Celiac syndrome so I'm pretty well versed in it. Honestly what you're describing doesn't really sound like it. In 10 years of being diagnosed I've never had hives or swelling of the lips or eyes. (Although this disorder is very person dependent) I break out in a rash of water blisters. They tend to stay to the elbows, shoulders and the back of the legs. There are tons of gluten free products on the market. For me, I take a medicating once a week and my symptoms are fairly controlled with that and avoiding certain foods that are a trigger. Absoultely no white bread for me and I have to limit intake on ice creams and chocolate. If you really think you have Celiac or a gluten allergy than you really need to be tested. BTW An allergist refused to seem me for this and I'm actually seen by a dermatologist.

MoniDew
05-20-2007, 03:40 PM
people without medical knowledge

naturopaths are required to take as many hours of anatomy, physiology, biochemistry, etc. as medical doctors. They study herbal pharmacology instead of chemical pharmacology, in addition to all the "alternative" modalities of treatment (Chinese and East Indian medicine, homeopathy, iridology, kinesiology, acupunture/pressure, etc.) They can and do treat the entire spectrum of illness and conditions, without drugs or surgery. THEY CAN, BECAUSE THEY KNOW HOW.

Just because a medical person doesn't know how they do it does not make the natural way LESS VALID.

Please do not think that because someone's training is not in Conventional Medicine that it is inferior. Mine was VASTLY superior. I have personally taught medical doctors and nurses, fellow naturopaths and nutritionist, chiropractors, etc.
________
RC series (http://www.honda-wiki.org/wiki/Honda_RC_series)

Susan P.
05-20-2007, 05:50 PM
moni.. It's always problematic to take a phrase out of context but I must admit I appear to so readily offend in off topic subjects I think I'll steer clear of them!

Again, perhaps this is a cultural issue BUT, outside the standard medical profession there is not the same level of rigorous testing and legal regulation as there is in the profession: at least not in my country. For example, in my last town of residence a man set himself up with similar quals to the set you refer to. I and many others went and saw him and we were faced with a quack out to make big dollars. He frightened each of us and then tried to say that unless we all made significant outlays on a schemata of pills and potions that we a) didn't really care for our health, and, b) would probably die in under 15 years.

He was hounded out of his 'trading' but not because he was doing anything illegal as such because, as I said, there isn't the regulatory system here to ensure he has 'x' level of training and that in obtaining his licence he went through rigorous testing.

Don't get me wrong, there are also example of medical practitioners and surgeons who have fudged the system also and we've had some classic examples of that here.

Moni..in my country you might be a superlative practitioner. You may have a full compliment of western medical knowledge (and been rigorously assessed as competent in the same) as well as the array of complimentary fields you list. But around you will be people who will claim similarly but who may have done largely training at distance via an independent college.

For what it is worth I virtually ONLY saw a Chinese Acupuncturist in the last years of living in that town but he knew his limitations and on occasion he would refer me to a western practitioner for something. It wasn't often but it happened. The university I was involved with had a large nurse training department but it also paralleled with naturopathy and so on.

Again, I would prefer a practitioner with an array of skills and knowledge at their command but I'm not sure *I* (my opinion) would call any one superior to the other although I do certainly see and know the limitations of western medical practice. It's generally lacking in pro activity for one thing. To me the best is that complimentary array.