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robynbird
06-25-2007, 09:40 PM
Or are other knitters out there content knitting in the english style? It seems everyone wants to knit continental and while I can do that and have enjoyed it, something about the english way brings a calmness to me.

I just wondered if there was anyone else like me? :)

Braden
06-25-2007, 09:42 PM
Well, I knit Continental. I always have, a week after I started knitting. But, some of the best knitters around here knit in the English style (like Ingrid, she knits English.) Just be comfortable with your own style, if you get what you like, than it's right. I just feel a certain comfort when I knit Continental, but that's just me. Knit whatever way is right for you, no matter what.

itsjustmeghan
06-25-2007, 09:43 PM
i've always knit english and only just recently learned continental. to be honest, i can see myself switching back and forth depending on the project. if it's rows of stockinette? i'll do conti. if it's anything more complicated? i'll probably just stick with my good old english.
it's like a security blanket. :hug:

ElenTikvah
06-25-2007, 09:43 PM
I agree with you, robynbird. When I first found knittinghelp.com, I learned to knit continental, and I'm glad that I did; but the rhythm of knitting english is very relaxing to me, and it is still my preferred style.

~Tik

ironmaiden
06-25-2007, 10:17 PM
Or are other knitters out there content knitting in the english style? It seems everyone wants to knit continental and while I can do that and have enjoyed it, something about the english way brings a calmness to me.

I just wondered if there was anyone else like me? :)

I like it just fine. I haven't learned how to knit continental yet, but I'm not in a hurry.

I suppose if I was ever eager to get things done more quickly I might want to learn, but I'm pretty quick as it is so I'm satisfied.

Ingrid
06-25-2007, 10:21 PM
I'm a firm English knitter. It's what knitting is for me. It's how I learned and the rhythm and movement is what makes knitting so pleasurable to me.

When I was a teenager, I used to watch the old Italian women on the train zipping through their knitting Conti style and couldn't figure out from watching them how they did it.

Now that I could knit Conti if I wanted to, it just doesn't seem like knitting to me. I have to pay too close attention at this point, too.
I'm satisfied with what I've made my way, so I'm sticking to it.

auburnchick
06-25-2007, 10:24 PM
I've been knitting English for a year now, and I've been happy. I could stay this way (and might still wind up doing so), but I want to give Continental a try for future projects.

I'm a person who likes efficiency. Everything I read tells me that Continental is more efficient.

So, I'm willing to try. But if I need to go back to English for good, I'll be okay with that too.

Shandeh
06-25-2007, 10:25 PM
I'm with Ingrid. I prefer English...but for completely different reasons.

I have constant pain in my left hand and wrist, so the only thing I can do with that hand is hold the left knitting needle. My right hand will also hurt if I twist my wrist, so I can't "pick out" stitches the Continental way. (I had to quit crochet for the same reason.)

So, I imagine that I'll be an English knitter for life. :thumbsup:

knitwit628
06-25-2007, 10:31 PM
I have been knitting for 4 years and the whole time I have been using the english method. I've heard continental is more efficient, but I don't plan on switching... I am content with the way I knit. :)

karendawn
06-25-2007, 10:34 PM
Another English knitter here. That's the way I chose (though I now don't remember why) when I learned and that's what feels completely comfortable to me. I've tried Continental a few times, but I give up after a few stitches. It just doesn't feel "right" to me and my tension is way too loose.

Braden
06-25-2007, 10:44 PM
I taught my grandmother, aunt, and brother how to knit English, and I found the rhythm to be nice, but I still prefer my Continental. Don't know why, I guess it's the way I officially learned, so I stick with it.

redheadrachel
06-25-2007, 11:04 PM
I knit English and don't see any real reason to switch. I could if I wanted to, but I just don't care to. English is fine for me!

robynbird
06-25-2007, 11:08 PM
I've heard it's more efficient too...not for me ...but it does hurt my right wrist so I usually can only do it for a bit. I guess we should all just knit the way we feel most comfortable and not feel any pressure to change right? :)

suzeeq
06-25-2007, 11:28 PM
I'm happy being English! I've tried conti (or combo knit really) and my tension is too tight. I may hold my yarn in my left for a while sometimes, but it's not as fast and mindless as `regular' knitting. BTW, I don't really move my hand as much as is demonstrated in the videos either. You don't have to.

robynbird
06-25-2007, 11:31 PM
BTW, I don't really move my hand as much as is demonstrated in the videos either. You don't have to. I don't' either. :)

auburnchick
06-25-2007, 11:34 PM
I don't' either. :)

The only part of my right hand that moves very much, when knitting English style, is my pointer finger. I'm not a thrower in that way, but more of a "winder," if you know what I mean.

Jan in CA
06-25-2007, 11:34 PM
Continental vs English is kind of like Mac vs PC, but when you come down to it it really doesn't matter as long as you can get the job done and enjoy it while you're at it. I read a lot of knitting books and I've seen a lot of videos what I've discovered is that one way is NOT necessarily faster or more efficient. It seems to all come down to how you do it. I've seen continental knitters take longer to do a stitch than me because of the way they hold the yarn. I've seen english knitters (like myself ahem!) knit in one smooth motion and it barely seems like "throwing".

It's personal preference....do what works for you and be happy. :)

Braden
06-25-2007, 11:48 PM
I agree wholeheartedly with Jan. One is not necessarily faster than the other, it's just how comfortable you are with your style. My Continental knitting is very fast, but that's probably because of practice and the way I hold my yarn. A lady in my LYS knits English and she can knit almost 100 stitches per minute, as can I, so it really all depends, again, on how comfortable you are with the way you knit. The needles are a factor, too, but that's a whole different debate...

feministmama
06-26-2007, 12:54 AM
What Jan said. I'm so tired of hearing people say conti is more efficient and faster. I don't care about that. Its all about the process being as relaxing as possible. I am in nooooo hurry.

English knitters unite!!:cheering:

kellyh57
06-26-2007, 01:07 AM
I knit English and have no desire to change. Why knit faster? That means I finish a project faster and have to start all over on something new sooner! And, when I say I'm just going to knit x more rows, I get more time than if I were knitting faster! I also use Boye needles, acrylics (Red Heart if needed), and anything else I find that fits my needs! I like it that way!

IrishKnitter
06-26-2007, 01:14 AM
I knit Continental...just because that's how the person who taught me knit. I'd like to learn English eventually, just to be able to do both, but I'm still working on feeling confident enough in the way I learned. :teehee:

I think you just go with whatever works for ya! :thumbsup:

Aussiekaz
06-26-2007, 01:24 AM
I am an English knitter because thats how my grandmother taught me.....I tried doing continental style and it felt uncomfortable and I was slooooow so its English style for me..but here is a little trivia I learnt when watching a History Channel documentry. Apparently the English method of knitting was introduced as it was more
"lady like" :rollseyes: so there ya go!

I say go with what you are happy with, my left wrist is slightly dodgy , old war injury (actually a roller skates injury back in the
70s :lol: ) so English helps my wrist to rest.

Karen-Ann
Down Under

Quiltlady
06-26-2007, 03:34 AM
I've always knit continental. Don't know any other way.:drool:

I think ANY way is the right way just as long as the person is knitting.:rofl:

Shandeh
06-26-2007, 04:05 AM
I always think it's funny when people tell me I could knit faster if I used the Continental method.

I mean, what's the deal? Am I supposed to be winning a race here?
I have no desire to be a production knitter. I want to enjoy my craft, instead of rushing through project after project.

Lieke
06-26-2007, 05:22 AM
I'm a real english knitter. I was taught that way by my mom and although I learned how to knit continental as well, it doesn't feel as relaxing as english knitting. It's like sandeh says, continental might be faster, but what's the fun of being fast if you don't like the style. The throwing gives some sort of relaxation, so I'll stick with the english way.

ironmaiden
06-26-2007, 07:31 AM
Just because I was curious, I gave continental a shot for awhile last night - very weird. Felt like I was starting all over :D.

Angelia
06-26-2007, 07:47 AM
I knit continental (it seems natural since I did crochet forever before knitting), but English is very soothing--it has a rhythm that continental lacks. Fair isle is a real joy because I use both styles at once. My only problem with English style is that I still haven't mastered how to hold the yarn. Even on fair isle projects it takes a few rows for me to get the hang of it. Once my right hand remembers what to do, I'm fine. It just has to re-learn every time since I don't do fair isle often.

I am also a process knitter, and it sometimes bothers me that I knit as fast as I do. Projects end very quickly. Too quickly. I tend not to think I knit fast, but that I can finish a pair of socks in a day suggests otherwise.

Guin
06-26-2007, 08:19 AM
I have been knitting for about 12 years now and never new there are different styles' of knitting till now ...And I am still not sure what kind of style I use :shock:

It is similar to continental , only I don't hold my index finger up .
I wrap the yarn around my pinkie and the yarn just lays across the rest of my left hand . I found that by holding my index finger up in the air with the yarn caused too tight of a gauge, I was fighting with the needles. I am so use to knitting this way and have been for a while , that my knits move along pretty quickly. So, I really don't think it matters what style you do that causes speed knitting.I think it is more experience based .

I tried English style last night and was all thumbs..so I will be sticking with my style . Besides , no matter what style a person knits with, it is comforting. I am always dozing off while knitting, yep , my family gets a real good laugh when they watch me knit..lol

It is interesting that there are so many different styles of knitting.
Thanks for sharing .:mrgreen:

Knitting_Guy
06-26-2007, 08:25 AM
I enjoy knitting English and am sure it will always be my primary style. I'm not interested in knitting faster. I am wanting to learn conti style because I think it's always good to learn new techniques and also it comes in handy when knitting double strands.

Braden
06-26-2007, 09:13 AM
*rant warning*

I don't know why people put such an emphasis on speed these days, be it in knitting or anything else, for that matter. If you enjoy the process and you are comfortable doing it, than who cares other than you? Now, if you are a results knitter, than you might want to learn a faster style, but most of us don't. I know that when I knit, I knit to unwind and relax, and knitting as fast as possible, you don't get that.

*rant over*

Vendie
06-26-2007, 09:53 AM
I knit continental, but I'm not a fast knitter by any stretch of the imagination. One of my good friends is an english knitter and can knit with alarming speed. I originally chose continental b/c I read that it could often be the more difficult style to learn, and I love to torture myself. :teehee: And it just felt more natural to me.

It's what you're comfortable with doing and one style is not better than the other. It's the process, the finished item, and the fact that you made it with your own hands.

Knitting_Guy
06-26-2007, 10:05 AM
*rant warning*

I don't know why people put such an emphasis on speed these days, be it in knitting or anything else, for that matter. If you enjoy the process and you are comfortable doing it, than who cares other than you? Now, if you are a results knitter, than you might want to learn a faster style, but most of us don't. I know that when I knit, I knit to unwind and relax, and knitting as fast as possible, you don't get that.

*rant over*



What he said.

cftwo
06-26-2007, 10:07 AM
I knit english and I'm quite happy with it. Maybe someday I'll learn continental just for the heck of it. But as long as english gets the project done, I'm happy with it.

BostonBecca
06-26-2007, 10:14 AM
I knit english style. I like it. It's what I learned as a child and so it makes sense to me. I did not knit for many years in between learning and picking it up again last year. However, my aunt tried to teach me continental style and I was having all sorts of trouble. I told her that wasn't how I learned to knit and she had my cousin show me english style and it was one of those lightbulb moments, where I remembered exactly how to knit. I am content to keep knitting this way. People tell me continental goes so much faster, but this is what works for me. It's personal preference. Would I feel the same way if I learned continental as a kid? Probably not. I'd probably be saying the same thing but with continental and english switched.

I like my knitting my way. Other people prefer the other ways. To each their own.

Angelia
06-26-2007, 10:46 AM
*rant warning*

I don't know why people put such an emphasis on speed these days, be it in knitting or anything else, for that matter. If you enjoy the process and you are comfortable doing it, than who cares other than you? Now, if you are a results knitter, than you might want to learn a faster style, but most of us don't. I know that when I knit, I knit to unwind and relax, and knitting as fast as possible, you don't get that.

*rant over*


You often brag about how fast you knit, so I'm not quite sure why you're ranting :shrug:

redheadrachel
06-26-2007, 10:55 AM
I started out as a crocheter also, but Continental wasn't any more natural for me than English. I guess it's because knitting seemed so different to me, the hand with which I held the yarn didn't make that much of a difference.
It's weird, though, that so many crocheters say they prefer Continental.

Stiney
06-26-2007, 11:10 AM
I knit English...I learned from a book before I found KH, and I couldn't make heads or tails of the Conti directions. :shrug:

I want to learn Conti, just because I do have problems with my hands through my elbows (tendonitis in my elbows: fun for every nerve ending!), and I want to see if it will ease the pain, but I don't think that one is "better" than the other--as long as your FO looks good, the method doesn't matter.

debinoz
06-26-2007, 11:26 AM
I learned crochet and knitting at the same time as a child. Dropped knitting (bad me) and crocheted for around 30 years before picking up knitting again. I absolutely cannot get the hang of conti, so I'll be sticking with english. I think it has to do with how I have to hold the yarn. I have to wrap around my index finger because of an accident as a child. (Arms, window, stitches, nerve damage to pinkies)

suzeeq
06-26-2007, 11:30 AM
Stiney, the tendonitis might be from knitting itself, having them bent for long periods of time can cause tension in the arm muscles. Do some stretches and massaging to see if that improves it any. sue

Jan in CA
06-26-2007, 11:33 AM
I started out as a crocheter also, but Continental wasn't any more natural for me than English. I guess it's because knitting seemed so different to me, the hand with which I held the yarn didn't make that much of a difference.
It's weird, though, that so many crocheters say they prefer Continental.

I agree. I was a crocheter long before I was a knitter. When I first started knitting it seemed natural to hold the yarn in my left hand, but in the end it felt awkward and uncomfortable. So I tried english and while it took the usual amount of time to master it felt much better from the beginning.

Stiney
06-26-2007, 11:51 AM
Stiney, the tendonitis might be from knitting itself, having them bent for long periods of time can cause tension in the arm muscles. Do some stretches and massaging to see if that improves it any. sue

It's a combination of knitting a computer use. I can't limit my computer use much, because I'm on the computer 90% of my work day. I've been to the doctor--I was getting Carpal Tunnel Symptoms--and I have braces and a prescription for anti-inflammatories. If I severely limit my knitting, and focus on keeping it in my lap instead of holding it up, I get minimal pain from English style, but it still does trigger it more than using the computer. I just have to focus very hard on keeping my elbows relaxed.

I doubt knitting continental will help, but I'd like to learn it anyway as it's probably a good skill-set to have, especially for when I start doing color-work.

VictoiseC
06-26-2007, 01:01 PM
Gosh this is a whole lot of reading here! Funny. I finally learned to knit continental and do it pretty comfortably too. And yes, I got sick of hearing it's faster too and just recently I decided to stop making myself knit continental when I don't want to! Like I need to go faster geez. Knitting English style is just so relaxing.

Sometimes when I really want to finish a project fast I will switch over to some conti for a while and also I've found some particular yarns and size needles it's very easy. But I love English style and that's that. Oh yeah, it really helps to know both when doing fair isle which I'm doing right now for the first time.

Lieke
06-26-2007, 01:01 PM
Well, I have tried continental, for stranded knitting, and it is not as hard as it looks, so I think you should be able to do it (if it was impossible, why do all the other continental knitters do it). I've got some joint problems and continental didn't do anything good for that (but my left hand is my bad hand, so there might be the problem).

you are right about knowing how to knit continental being a good skill. it's easy when you want to do something stranded, and that's really much fun.

what seemed a bit funny to me was my tension. It's much more even with the english style. With continental, I can't seem to get it right.

1to1
06-26-2007, 01:09 PM
English for me too. I was taught that way so it is easier for ME. I knit Cont occassionally but always end up going back to English.

Check this out-Knitting Portuguese Style.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZ31pk05CBE

Silver
06-26-2007, 01:28 PM
I knit English most of the time, but I am very glad I learned continental too because it really makes knitting color work so much easier. When I'm knitting fair isle, I will knit one color with my right hand, and the other color with my left hand. I think of continental as just another skill that I can use to knit more efficiently. Like learning to knit cables without a cable needle or learning to knit on a magic loop.

I am an English knitter, but I can knit continental when I want to. I've never knit a whole project continental from start to finish, but I have swapped back and forth in the middle of a project.

I think whichever way you prefer to knit is great for you. But I do recommend that you learn to knit both ways if you ever plan on knitting fair isle. It makes it so much easier, faster and more fun! :)

Jeremy
06-26-2007, 01:39 PM
The main advantage in knitting continental vs. english for me is the tension. I am a very tight knitter with English and doing things such as knitting through the back loop and cabling are a real chore. I am much looser with continental although my tension is consistent. I would say speed wise I am probably about the same although that was originally the reason I switched.

bellium
06-26-2007, 01:40 PM
i don't knit in either style - i am a lefty, so theoretically continental should be easier for me, but i can't get my tension right when i wind the yarn through the fingers of my left hand. i have adapted my own way of holding the yarn between my thumb and index finger on my left hand - it's difficult for me to explain exactly how, but it works for me. i can knit as fast as i feel like i want to knit, i can get gauge, and i think my projects come out just as nicely as those knit in the english or continental style. so, chalk me up as another subscriber of doing what feels right to you.

clb1968
06-26-2007, 01:42 PM
Since I have only been knitting a few months , I am content with knitting English, I might try Contintental in the future, but this works great for now.

knittingbrooke
06-26-2007, 02:11 PM
i knit english but, call me silly, don't get the 'throwing' that people talk about. anyone mind explaining?

i've thought about learning how to knit continental just out of curiousity. i think, like many others, whichever way you like best works!

meearnol
06-26-2007, 02:22 PM
I knit English, too. I learned continental so I'd know how to do it, but I find that I have to concentrate too much. I do have a question though: how do you guys know how many stitches per minute you knit?

suzeeq
06-26-2007, 02:22 PM
Some people `throw' their yarn in that they take their right hand completely off the needle to wrap it around the tip.

knittingbrooke
06-26-2007, 02:26 PM
i was thinking the same thing. call me crazy, but if i tried counting the stitches per minutes and tried to follow a pattern, i'd go nuts! :)

nadja la claire
06-26-2007, 02:32 PM
I'm an English knitter, I would like to learn conti for things like intarsia and fair isle or just to be able to trade up sometimes but I really do enjoy knitting English style.

:muah: :hug:

Nadja xxx

syndactylus
06-26-2007, 02:39 PM
another english knitter here.
I learned the very beginnings of how to knit continental when I first started, but now that I can't figure out how to do double knitting english and would have to learn continental to make this blanket I've been obsessing over, I am on the verge of swearing off it forever.
I hate continental with a hate that is deep in my heart.
and I don't really understand what's so great about knitting looser either. by the time I started knitting my first real socks I was knitting loose enough I would have had to go down -3s to get the gauge the pattern said, and it was driving me batty. & with continental now, I can't even get proper stitches, it's just a mess. (& I know I'm inept and perhaps it would just take practice, but honestly - no thank you! maybe later.)

Braden
06-26-2007, 03:00 PM
You often brag about how fast you knit, so I'm not quite sure why you're ranting :shrug:

:oops: I didn't think I was bragging. I really don't care about how fast I knit, I'm a process knitter. My 'regular' knitting speed is not fast by any means. Sorry.

And, there are many knitters out there and around here that are waaay faster than myself, so I really have no right to brag.

Stiney
06-26-2007, 03:00 PM
and I don't really understand what's so great about knitting looser either. by the time I started knitting my first real socks I was knitting loose enough I would have had to go down -3s to get the gauge the pattern said, and it was driving me batty. & with continental now, I can't even get proper stitches, it's just a mess. (& I know I'm inept and perhaps it would just take practice, but honestly - no thank you! maybe later.)

Most people knit too tight, it sounds like you don't have that problem at all. I used to have a really, really hard time getting the tip of the needle into a stitch. I've relaxed, and now I knit more loosely. :thumbsup:

cookworm
06-26-2007, 03:15 PM
I tried to teach myself how to knit Continental because I heard that it's faster, but I just can't get the hang of holding the yarn in my left hand. No matter how I wrap it, it comes off, so I worry my tension will be off or uneven, which would be horrible for me--part of what I love about knitting is that it always looks so even and consistent. I'm not sure that switching to Continental would make my knitting faster as I'm not really a fast knitter anyway (somewhere in between fast and slow). Although not being able to do Continental knitting bugged me a bit for a while there, I'm okay with it now. I've knit lots of different things and I'm learning all the techniques I know as an English knitter--would I be able to figure out how to do those techniques as a combined knitter or knitting Continental? I don't know.

Sanibelle
06-26-2007, 04:13 PM
Wow - this is such an interesting thread.

For me, I knit to relax. But I think I am the oddball in this group, I knit combined - I always have. That is the way my grandma taught me. Many people have told me I knit "wrong" but I don't care.... that is how I knit and that is what makes me happy. I do have to adjust patterns sometimes but that is OK too... after almost 40 years (I learned to knit before I was born!) I don't think I am going to change!!!!

Braden
06-26-2007, 04:16 PM
I've always said-there is no "wrong" way to knit. As long as your way gets the job done, who cares?

chrislt8
06-26-2007, 06:55 PM
chocolate...vanilla...and sometimes strawberry - I like 'em all :roflhard:

I originally learned to knit english but have some wrist/hand problems and thought I would try conti to see if that helped at all - and for some reason conti feels more "natural" to me...so I will probably do more in that method. Right now, I am switching back and forth (by project, but always have at least 2 otn, so one will be english and one will be conti) - I like the variety!

To me, the only wrong way to knit is to not pick up the needles! :happydancing:

IrishKnitter
06-26-2007, 07:06 PM
To me, the only wrong way to knit is to not pick up the needles! :happydancing:

I agree!!! :thumbsup:

Braden
06-26-2007, 07:27 PM
I agree!!! :thumbsup:

As do I!

robynbird
06-26-2007, 08:08 PM
I agree!!! :thumbsup:
Me too! :) Thanks for all your replies. IT was interesting and enlightening to read. :)

Shandeh
06-26-2007, 08:30 PM
Many people have told me I knit "wrong" but I don't care.... that is how I knit and that is what makes me happy.

Shandeh's Rare RANT :teehee:
I can't STAND people who criticize others for doing things a different way from what THEY prefer! :!!!:

When someone says something critical to me, I stop what I'm doing and give them a good full-on wicked stare. How dare they criticize me for being myself!
*end of rant*
(Shandeh resumes her usual cheerful life.) :)

Braden
06-26-2007, 08:34 PM
I agree. Why can't they just do what they want to do, and leave other people alone? We all have our own different ways to do things, and other people have theirs. That's how it is. :shrug:

zkimom
06-26-2007, 09:24 PM
I agree. Why can't they just do what they want to do, and leave other people alone? We all have our own different ways to do things, and other people have theirs. That's how it is. :shrug:

I so agree. I'm really tired of the whole "how do you knit?" conversation.

Funny thing is that I am planning on teaching a knitting class and I knit continental. I don't know how to knit English at all. So now I'm wondering what everyone will think when I teach them conti knitting. I'm hoping it doesn't become an issue. I've been trying to learn English just in case someone asks. I have to have my 8 year old dd show me how she learned (she learned at school) so I can show people how to knit English if that's what they prefer.

I knit faster knitting continental cause that's the way I learned. But I have seen some smokin' English knitters.

What matters to me is the product. No one can tell the difference when you show them a scarf or a hat. They can't pick it up and say "Oh, you knitted this combined."

Plus, knitting isn't a race.

Just my not so very humble opinion.

Best,
Susan

Shandeh
06-26-2007, 09:33 PM
No one can tell the difference when you show them a scarf or a hat. They can't pick it up and say "Oh, you knitted this combined."
:roflhard:
Now, if someone could do THAT, I would give them a MEDAL!

MoniDew
06-26-2007, 09:39 PM
Well, I guess I'm the odd one here, because the first time I saw conti knitting I was immediately envious of the grace, efficiency of movement, and yes, the speed, of the style.

I too learned as a child from a book. I couldn't make head or tails of conti style pictures, but english "took." Have knitted english ever since (about 40 years now.) I still can't knit conti, no matter how hard I try, and I still am embarrased by my english. (Don't want to KIP and be seen knitting english.)

So, I still haven't learned conti style.

And I still don't know how to cast on.... but that's another story.
________
Extreme Vaporizer (http://www.vaporshop.com/extreme-q-vaporizer.html)

Shandeh
06-26-2007, 09:44 PM
Don't be embarrassed by your English knitting! :pout:
You are a crafty, skilled person!

BostonBecca
06-26-2007, 10:13 PM
Ditto to what Shandeh said!

SabrinaJL
06-26-2007, 11:44 PM
I learned to knit Continental (because I like to know how to do things) but I prefer English. Continental requires too much effort for me. I knit just fine English style and my attitude is this: if it ain't broke, don't fix it. ;)

Silver
06-27-2007, 12:31 AM
If anything, I think this thread shows that everyone knits differently, prefers different styles and there really is no right or wrong way to knit!

G J
06-27-2007, 12:49 AM
Oooh. Good thread! I'm an English knitter, but I don't knit the way the Conti knitters demonstrate in the videos. I barely lift my hand on the right. I've tried knitting Conti, but just can't get the hang of it. I'm pleased with my knitting, I enjoy it and it relaxes me.

Lieke
06-27-2007, 01:56 AM
Some people `throw' their yarn in that they take their right hand completely off the needle to wrap it around the tip.
*raises hand*

that'd be me :)

Debbie
06-27-2007, 03:33 AM
MoniDew .... I want to hear the story .... it has got to be good .... knitting for 40 years and can't cast on ?? :oo: Do you have a surrogate caster-on-er :) ?

AmandaC
06-27-2007, 04:02 AM
*raises hand*

that'd be me :)


Me too .... although I have switched to Continental ..... English - my whole hand would move off the right needle and I would knit so tightly for fear of the stitches falling off .... then I tried Conti several times unsuccessfully before I found a way of purling easily and I now love it! I taught my friend the English way ... but when she has finished her first fo I am going to show her the Conti way too - she can decide which she prefers.

My tension is looser on Conti - but that now means that I usually get gauge with the needles recommended in the pattern :shrug: before, I used to have to go up 1 or 2 sizes!

I must also say though - with English knitting I could knit without looking but Conti - I am always looking at the needles....

Horses for courses ....

Sanibelle
06-27-2007, 09:12 AM
If anything, I think this thread shows that everyone knits differently, prefers different styles and there really is no right or wrong way to knit!


Amen!

cozy
06-27-2007, 09:20 AM
I'm so glad someone else said it. While I have a desire to learn Continental, just to learn it because I love learning new things when it comes to knitting, I'm very happy with English. Even if I never learn Continental, I'll still be content.

Yarnlady
06-27-2007, 09:51 AM
Some people `throw' their yarn in that they take their right hand completely off the needle to wrap it around the tip. This is how I knit. I learned from a book some 45 years ago. I taught myself continental but it took all the fun out of knitting. :shrug: The rhythm of all the movements of throwing the yarn is what makes it enjoyable for me. I'm definitely a process not a product knitter....which makes it really nice as I don't have a long attention span for most projects.

Teeka
06-27-2007, 09:57 AM
English for me too. I was taught that way so it is easier for ME. I knit Cont occassionally but always end up going back to English.

Check this out-Knitting Portuguese Style.

Thanks for that video! I love seeing the different ways that people knit. I learned to knit from my sisters-in-law seven months ago. They knit continental, so I do too. But I'd like to learn English as well. The thumb method in the video is cool, though. It looks like a nice combo style. :X:

Eloewien
06-27-2007, 10:51 AM
I'm a lefty and started with crochet, where the yarn is in my right hand, so english was more natural. However, I did learn conti for fair isle so I could hold one color in each hand.

VictoiseC
06-27-2007, 11:09 AM
I hate continental with a hate that is deep in my heart.


:rofling: I think that's so funny coz sometimes when I make myself do conti to go a bit faster (a wee bit) I HATE IT TOO and get mad at myself for making myself do it.

Of course other times I just breeze along with it and everything's ok.

I also find being able to switch back and forth relieves the tension that starts building up. COOKWORM I wish I could show you coz it took me a long time to get it then one day it just clicked and became easy. If you're ever out my way I will show you!

Lieke
06-27-2007, 01:03 PM
Me too .... although I have switched to Continental ..... English - my whole hand would move off the right needle and I would knit so tightly for fear of the stitches falling off .... then I tried Conti several times unsuccessfully before I found a way of purling easily and I now love it! I taught my friend the English way ... but when she has finished her first fo I am going to show her the Conti way too - she can decide which she prefers.

My tension is looser on Conti - but that now means that I usually get gauge with the needles recommended in the pattern :shrug: before, I used to have to go up 1 or 2 sizes!

I must also say though - with English knitting I could knit without looking but Conti - I am always looking at the needles....

Horses for courses ....
Well, I used to knit tight as well, but with gaining speed, I automatically started to knit looser. Now I can adjust my tension (I worked with fixations and you can't knit tight at all with this, it worked for me). When I take my right hand from the right needle, I hold the stitch with my left hand, so nothing falls off. I even manage to keep the needle in the same place while my right hand is off the needle, but don't ask me how I do that. It's just natural.

Shandeh
06-27-2007, 01:46 PM
I'm trying to loosen up my knitting as well, because it just hurts my hands too much if I don't. And I want to knit for MANY YEARS! :thumbsup:

MoniDew
06-27-2007, 04:19 PM
MoniDew .... I want to hear the story .... it has got to be good .... knitting for 40 years and can't cast on ?? :oo: Do you have a surrogate caster-on-er :) ?

I purl on...not knit on, purl on. It's the only way I can figure out how to do it. I can't figure out the long tail way, or the single handed way. When you are self taught, especially at an extremely young age, you adapt something until you "officially" learn, which I never got around to doing. Now my adaptation is a bad habit. Bummer! My cast off is so much tighter than my cast on that squarish garments (blankets, etc.) are NEVER square. They are (searching for the right word here,) trapezoidal.

I have many bad knitting habits to unlearn. That's one of the things that drew me to Amy's videos. I need to see/watch someone who knows how - do all the things that I do wrong - the right way.

By the way, thank you for the encouragement Shandeh (and others.)
________
HOST AND DESIGN (http://hostndesign.com)

threesmom
06-27-2007, 04:46 PM
My knitting is just plain perfect ... for me. :heart: It keeps me happy and sane:heart:, and I make pretty little things with lovely little yarns. I usually have even tension, but sometimes I don't, I mess up often, and can fix it usually. I try new things, but love the tried and true, I don't do color, and my lace is messy. I do a mean sweater, but haven't attempted a sock. I'm as fast as I need to be. I could tell you I knit conti - but after all that, do you care? :teehee:

Shandeh
06-27-2007, 06:35 PM
:teehee:

Braden
06-27-2007, 08:01 PM
All I can say is speed doesn't matter. Knitting isn't a race. I can knit fast enough for the only one who really cares-me. I get the job done well, so :shrug:

Well, that was waaay off topic for this area of the thread :teehee: All I can say is, Monidew, you're a great knitter, no matter what you can/can't do! :thumbsup:

gamerchik
06-27-2007, 10:33 PM
I'm an English knitter (and a pretty new knitter, too). I can knit Continental, but it feels awkward for me. The thing I like most about English knitting is that I don't have to look at the needles to knit...I can watch movies or TV or the cat...whatever. In fact, this afternoon, I sat in the chair with my eyes closed and just knit for a little while...so relaxing!!!

I think Conti knitting looks very graceful. I would like to get better at it for Fair Isle, but otherwise I am perfectly happy as an English knitter.

suzeeq
06-27-2007, 11:25 PM
I purl on...not knit on, purl on. It's the only way I can figure out how to do it. I can't figure out the long tail way, or the single handed way. When you are self taught, especially at an extremely young age, you adapt something until you "officially" learn, which I never got around to doing. Now my adaptation is a bad habit. Bummer! My cast off is so much tighter than my cast on that squarish garments (blankets, etc.) are NEVER square. They are (searching for the right word here,) trapezoidal.

I tried purled cast ons for a while - it turns out like the crochet CO - and found they were looser than any other I've ever done. So loose I even used a needle size smaller than I needed for the body. Maybe you could try that.

abodenrader
07-13-2007, 03:16 PM
I'm a new knitter - and learned English style - but the "race" is on for me - I'm knitting a sweater for my toddler daughter, and she hit a growth spurt - I'm afraid by the time I finish it, it will have to be for her little sister (due in 3 weeks!) - I'd switch to conti, but I'm such a slow learner... and I enjoy knitting to relax! Talk about stress. LOL

On a side note, is one or other style better for carpal tunnel?

Limey
07-13-2007, 03:38 PM
I always knitted English, holding long straight needles under my right arm and just having a light grip on the left.

I decided to give Conti a go when I wanted to knit hats and now, if I'm using a circular needle, it seems natural to stick the yarn in my left hand.

When it comes to DPNs, I use English - I couldn't take out enough insurance to cover all the breakages and damage to the windows and walls if I tried Conti with the pins. First time I used those little spears, I almost took my husband's eye out and harpooned the cat. :whoosh::thud:

jumboneedle
07-13-2007, 03:49 PM
I just had to ask BostonBecca today what style I knit with so I could watch the right videos. I guess I knit English!

Doublereeder2
07-14-2007, 02:01 AM
English here 'cos I taught myself from one of those little kits. I would like to learn continental just to have other options, but it is not on the front burner. I also like the rhythm of throwing the yarn (even tho I don't use a grand gesture to do it). I actually feel so relaxed when I am knitting I get sleepy.:sleepy:

suzeeq
07-14-2007, 08:48 AM
On a side note, is one or other style better for carpal tunnel?

Either style can give you problems. It's repetitive motion that can causes it. Most carpal tunnel symptoms are due to overused, tight muscles in the arms, and also in the neck from looking down or holding your head in the same position for too long. These tight muscles can put pressure on your nerves and blood vessels giving you the CT symptoms, or will stay contracted and cause tendonitis. Always a good idea to take breaks while you're knitting, stretching and moving your arms, neck and shoulders.

JoeE
07-14-2007, 10:41 AM
Somewhere along the way, I seem to have almost unlearned English. It's how I was taught, but I always had a lot of trouble purling (always absurdly loose). Conti fixed that problem, but I miss the rhythm of English and wish I had been more diligent about forcing myself to learn to purl English.

One quirk for me is that I tend to knit English when I use Red Heart Super Saver yarn (which I still think is a good option for baby blankets--it really does get softer after washing). It's soooo thick and stiff that my hands begin to ache when I knit Conti with it. Luckily the blankets I've made with it have been all knit stitches, so I don't have ugly, loopy purls to deal with. When I'm using wool yarn, I have no issues with Conti. Weird, huh?

Joe

Braden
07-14-2007, 11:39 AM
Continental is just more comfortable for me, when I knit English, I find the yarn doesn't really feed through my fingers as well as it does when I knit conti. That's why I decided to hold both colors in my left hand for Fair Isle.

Lobug
07-14-2007, 11:51 AM
I just found this thread, and I'm fascinated that it's such a big topic. I've read books where knitters have been approached on their commute and actually rebuked for how they knit! How lame!:rollseyes: I knit English, but learned Conti. It's great for Fair Isle; but can someone tell me how to manage more than 2 threads at a time??:?? I also try to teach both methods so someone can use what works best for them. I had a friend who learned English, but when I showed her Conti, she just took off with it. And vice versa for other friends. "To each his own"

Braden
07-14-2007, 11:55 AM
Well, this is how I hold my yarns for Fair Isle, if that's what you needed to see:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=326-FBq3fvs

(not my hands, just a vid I found that shows how I hold my yarns)

Lobug
07-14-2007, 10:35 PM
Thanks for the vid. It looks complicated, but I'm sure it gets easier with practice. I do 2color Fair Isle with one hand Conti and one English, but I recently did a 3 color Fair Isle and it was so hard to handle the 3rd strand. Thank you for the help.

Doodknitwit
07-14-2007, 10:46 PM
I knit conti..purl English... its weird the purling conti is backward feeling to me... guess I'm a switch hitter:eyes:

NinaT
07-14-2007, 11:16 PM
I have always knitted english but I learned how to purl conti for fair isle. I love it!! However, I don't use conti for anything else. To me it's like trying to learn to write with my left hand. I feel uncoordinated and I can never get the yarn to feed correctly. I just seem to have a better rhythm with english.

redheadrachel
07-15-2007, 12:34 AM
Once I gave continental a fair chance (knit a pair of socks with it) it stopped being awkward and is actually now my preferred style of knitting. It does make me go faster, which is nice, but above and beyond that: it makes me stitches all so even!!! When I knit English, my purls are looser than my knits. When I did stockinette stitch on straight needles, the reverse side would have two rows of the ridges, then a little gap, then two more rows of ridges. Right now I'm working on the back of a sweater on straight needles, and the wrong side of the stockinette is completely even.
I knit with much more confidence when I knit continental, because I know my stitches are nice and even and looking fabulous :)

Shandeh
07-15-2007, 08:31 AM
I have perfect tension with English, but if I try Continental, it all looks like crap. My left hand is just too weak to hold the needle and yarn properly. (I have arthritis and nerve trouble on my left side) So, I'm stuck with English.