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photolady
12-09-2007, 11:01 AM
I would like to know what the yarn is called, when the color
goes from, say, dark red, to light red, to pink, to light pink.

I looked up transition yarn, but, that's not it. What I want is a yarn, that, when knitted, gives a color gradient.
Is that possible? Are those on the market?:think:

suzeeq
12-09-2007, 11:20 AM
Variegated or self striping. The difference is that in variegated yarn, the colors change every few inches on the yarn, which is every few stitches when you knit it. With selfstriping, the color changes are longer, from a couple feet to yards, and so gives a striping effect when you knit it.

yarnrainbow
12-09-2007, 11:33 AM
Are you perhaps thinking of the word "ombre" (from Merriam-Websters dictionary: Ombre - having colors or tones that shade into each other —used especially of fabrics in which the color is graduated from light to dark)? :??

I believe ombre is the term used when you going from one shade in a color family to another (e.g., dark red to light red to pink to light pink).

Variegated is when you go from one color family to another (e.g., blue to yellow to green).

From Merriam-Websters dictionary: Variegated - having discrete markings of different colors <variegated leaves>

suzeeq
12-09-2007, 11:47 AM
Variegated yarn can also be in the same color family.

yarnrainbow
12-09-2007, 11:54 AM
You're right. I think I emphasized the wrong words. Variegated emphasizes "discrete markings" (i.e., individually distinct section, clearly defined end of section) whereas Ombre emphasizes "shading" into each other so there is no "individually distinct", clearly defined beginning or end of the color. I believe Photolady's yarn may fit into either the variegated or ombre category depending on whether the color sections are distinct or flow into each other.

suzeeq
12-09-2007, 12:02 PM
Ahh, I see now. The selfstriping also shades one color into another.

photolady
12-09-2007, 12:58 PM
You're right. I think I emphasized the wrong words. Variegated emphasizes "discrete markings" (i.e., individually distinct section, clearly defined end of section) whereas Ombre emphasizes "shading" into each other so there is no "individually distinct", clearly defined beginning or end of the color. I believe Photolady's yarn may fit into either the variegated or ombre category depending on whether the color sections are distinct or flow into each other.

Im just looking for some yarn that when I knit, gradually fades from dark to light.
ombre sounds like the right descriptive word, I guess I was confused, using variegated.
Gradient is the word that best describes the color pattern I'm looking for. You know, how, in Photoshop, you can put a color gradient on a background? that type of thing.
Yes, now that I think about it, it would be tones that gradually go from dark to light.
I think I saw a Caron yarn like that, but, looking at their samples online, I'm not sure if that ombre Caron yarn will produce a color gradient.

Here: A yarn that produces this effect:
http://i144.photobucket.com/albums/r173/nancy7771/gradient.jpg

Eccie
12-09-2007, 02:14 PM
The yarn in my avatar does that. It goes from blueish to purplish and back again. It's labled as "self striping" and also as "shaded effect"

Julie
12-10-2007, 08:49 PM
It's hard to find commercially spun yarn that has color gradations that are long enough to, say, be dark at the beginning of your project and end up light at the very end. Most will have repeats -- though some are longer than others. Kauni is a good example of a yarn with really long repeats...WEBS is going to be carrying it soon too :happydance:

Kime
12-11-2007, 02:31 AM
One problem, or it can be a problem, depending on what effect you want, is that self striping yarn will have thin stripes in wider areas and wide stripes in thinner areas. If you want complete control over the gradients and where they fall, for instance if you want a garment to go from dark at the bottom to light at the top, then you should consider dying your own color gradients by dying perhaps 50 grams of each part of your gradient, and changing yarns as you knit. It isn't really hard to do, but you have to get set up for dying, which probably wouldn't be worth it for one project, but if you have a lot of intrest in color work would be a good idea. Dying yarn is a lot of fun.

photolady
12-17-2007, 11:58 PM
The yarn in my avatar does that. It goes from blueish to purplish and back again. It's labled as "self striping" and also as "shaded effect"

Yes, exactly! that's one reason why I like it. I think I got some at Michael's a week ago.
What was the name of your avatar yarn?

fibrenut
12-18-2007, 12:02 AM
hmmm, back in the day it used to be called "ombre" yarn. Where the colors would all be in one family and gradually fade one to another.