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photolady
02-20-2008, 07:19 PM
I've always been interested in earthquakes. Never been in one, but, I see that Baja California just had one.
Have you ever been in an earthquake? One over a magnitude 5?

I've been in a hurricane, that's about it. Power out, lots of wind, tons of rain, etc.:shock:

Never seen a tornado,either. Have you ever been near a tornado?
Seen one in person?

I'd love to hear personal accounts of earthquakes and/or tornadoes.

P.S. If you can, try to look at the lunar eclipse tonight.:wink:

Begins around 8 pm, ends around 10 pm.

stitchwitch
02-20-2008, 07:26 PM
No dice on the lunar for me, it's been gloomy all day. I was in an earthquake in Tennessee a few years back (yep, TN is on a fault line). The epicenter was in Alabama somewhere and it followed the fault line up the Appalachians. Most bizarre thing I've ever experienced being a Florida gal myself. The whole house started shaking, you could hear the steel of our stairs going "tink, tink, tink". I thought it was cool, my husband kept telling me to shut up so he could hear if the house was going to collapse. :roflhard: The cat slept through it but was wildly paranoid a few days before, hiding under the bed, etc. She never does that, I'm guessing it was that animal instinct.

kellyh57
02-20-2008, 07:30 PM
Tornadoes- never hit personally, but heard them. In 2003, there was one just a few blocks from our house. It sounds like a big train. My husband told me it was the sirens that were losing power, but I knew from hearing them before. We had debris in our yard. It was really weird and very scary! That's the one that sticks out most in my mind, but there have been a few others very close to me.

I've been in quite a few huge thunderstorms. We had $1200 of damage done to our car with hail a couple of years ago. Not fun! We actually got hit twice that day. Ugh. First time we were home ready to leave for church but we stayed in so we wouldn't damage the van. The second time, I was out shopping. I'm so glad I wasn't on the road, but I was trapped in the center of Wal Mart for a while. Ugh.


No hurricanes or earthquakes for this midwest girl!

Kelly

Jan in CA
02-20-2008, 07:48 PM
I live in southern CA so I've been in lots of them. I don't remember exactly what each one sounded or felt like. They can feel like a sharp jolt and shaking or they can be more rolling. Both have noise some of which is the house I suppose, but you can hear rumbling. When we feel something now we look at a hanging lamp and see if it's moving. If it is, it's an earthquake. They don't scare me anymore. Sometimes DH sleeps through them. Were still waiting for "The Big One".

Let's see... There are always lots of little ones that you barely feel...it's the ones over 6 that you really remember. The bigger ones I've been in....

The first one I ever felt was the Sylmar/San Fernando quake (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/events/1971_02_09.php) in 1971 which was a 6.6. I lived about 75 miles south I think. That one, being the first, was really scary. I was living at home at the time (still in HS) and it felt like the whole house was moving. My strongest memory of that one was watching my brothers come down the stairway and they were laughing their heads off. :teehee:

1992 - Lander's Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/landersq.html) June 28th 4:57 am registered 7.3
1992 - Big Bear Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/bigbear.html) June 28th 8:05 am registered 6.4
Yep, the two above were on the same morning. I got up with the first one and sat in the doorway. When it was over we watched the TV. Eventually we went back to bed only to be awakened by the second one. Sat in doorway again and then got up for good. Lots of shaking with both of them.

1994 - Northridge Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/northreq.html) registered 6.7
Lots of shaking, but nothing that I remember other than some major damage near the epicenter. One of my uncles lives in Northridge and he had major damage.

Knitting_Guy
02-20-2008, 07:53 PM
Yep and yep. I once was driving along I-20 in Louisiana at night and it was storming. My weather alert radio announced a twister running along I-20 in a certain parish that happened to be the one I was in at the time.

I started looking around and a flash of lightening showed me that the tornado was right across from my truck about 100 yards away and going the same direction I was. I hit the breaks and it suddenly crossed the interstate just about where I would have been had I not stopped.

I also once stood and watched one pass right behind my rig while it was parked in a truckstop in Texas.

I was once blind for a little over three months after being hit by lightening.

I was hoping to see the eclipse tonight but it's cloudy here in Florida so I probably won't get to see it.

evona
02-20-2008, 07:57 PM
I'm a native Southern Californian and have been through quite a few tremblors. You get used to the smaller ones. As far as earthquakes over a 5.0 - I was in homeroom during the 1987 Whittier Earthquake - that was a 5.9. Funny thing was that we were supposed to have an earthquake drill that day. A friend of mine was looking over some of my notes for one of our classes and when the earthquake hit she threw my binder in the air and I could see my papers floating down from under my desk (we were always taught to climb under our desks in earthquakes). I was more upset about my papers being all messed up than the earthquake :rofl:

I was in Northern California during the really big Northridge quake in 1994. I moved back down later that year though and felt some big aftershocks. My entire street was red tagged. I lived in one of only 2 buildings left standing. My aunt lived not far from the epicenter and I was really worried about her. I contacted Red Cross to find her because, of course, the phone lines were down and it took about 2 days before I got word that her and my uncle were ok.

evona
02-20-2008, 08:07 PM
I forgot about the Landers Quake! I was in Northern California for that one as well (from 1990 to 1994). There was a big earthquake on the coast while I was in Northern California, but I can't rightly say that I "experienced" that one considering that where I was we just had a slight rumbling and a few car alarms go off. However, when I later moved to Santa Cruz for a couple of years I was told lots of stories about the "big quake" from their perspective. Supposedly it ripped up the main drag of Downtown Santa Cruz.

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/events/1992_04_25_26.php

BinkyKat
02-20-2008, 08:19 PM
Tornadoes have happened near here, been in some bad residual storms because of them. I find them earily interesting so while I won't be dumb and gawk outside at one, I'll try to watch bad weather as long as possible while it's safe to be outside. I'm kind of a dork like that.
In 1957 the worst tornado in local history hit our town, 6 kids from one family were killed, only one boy survived. It was written that Mr. Fujita used the data for developing his scale of tornado severity.
My only earthquake experience was a couple summers ago. My mom took me to Disneyland and the day we left, we felt a small one while waiting in the hotel lobby for our shuttle. Someone mentioned it and I could see a table lamp sort of shimmy a little. I thought is was cool, again I'm a dork. It basically felt like the vibration you feel when you are in your car at a railroad crossing when a train goes by. Eerie...

cristeen
02-20-2008, 08:21 PM
I was in the Loma Prieta quake. The one that collapsed the Bay Bridge. I was at school at the time, calling my ride to pick me up and all of a sudden everything started moving. I had no idea what was going on, it felt almost like vertigo, until I saw the concrete sidewalk coming at me. It looked just like a rolling wave you would see at the ocean, only it was made out of concrete.

We have quakes here on a regular basis. Most of the time I don't notice them. There have been a few sharp ones that have woken me up from a sound sleep. But if it weren't for the fact that the ceiling fan is shaking, I might just think it was a gunshot that woke me (which isn't unusual, either).

There was one a month or so ago... around a 3 that was fairly strong. A rolling quake, epicentered about a mile from my house, it went on for about 10 seconds or so, long enough for me to get out of my desk chair and into the doorway. Usually they're over so quickly I just have time to brace my computer before it's over. It felt fairly similar to Loma Prieta, that rolling wave-like motion.

Usually anything under a 3.0 I don't feel. Having been raised here, we tend not to get terribly excited by them most of the time. We did have a really strong one a few months back, in the middle of the night. Not a rolling-wave one, but a long jolting-shaking one. DH was sleeping on the couch and I was in the bedroom. It woke both of us up so violently that we both went running through the house looking for the other one, adrenaline pumping wildly, both of us had the shakes. We just held onto eachother until we calmed down a bit. By that point of course we were both wide awake so we turned on the computer to find out the magnitude and were shocked to see it was under 4. It was just so local and so violent.

Baja is very active right now. They didn't have one quake. Just in the last week they've had... well, I stopped counting at 100, but it looks to be closer to 200.

figaro
02-20-2008, 09:10 PM
I am a northern California native and I hate earthquakes. Something about no notice and no control, I just hate them. I have been in a few of them, one I remember while I was working at a vet hospital back in 1992, we had a 7.6 that was centered south/southwest of Eureka, CA and it freaked me out. The vet had a black and white tiled floor and I was standing in the doorway watching it wave up and down like the ocean then I looked out the window at the former Safeway and saw the plate glass window also bending in and out. When I lived in southern CA, we had a few. Nothing major but I still hated them.

Knitting_Guy
02-20-2008, 10:01 PM
Mother Nature is being kind. The clouds have cleared just in time for the eclipse. I love a good show!

ecb
02-20-2008, 10:25 PM
Lets see, I have felt a few SMALL east coast Quakes, the first one in maine happened right after we moved into this house. There was also one stroong enough to shake the cubbords in Pa. There was a small Tornado in Delaware about 8-10 Years ago, my Xh and I were driving to Va, and we could just see it across the marsh, or field or whatever it was. And the one day Hurricane Berth Touched down North of Fla, was both ON and AT my Sisters Wedding. So although its never been a big deal, or as dangerous as some get, I have had my experiences.

ecb

Jan in CA
02-20-2008, 11:05 PM
Mother Nature is being kind. The clouds have cleared just in time for the eclipse. I love a good show!

Lucky!! It's too cloudy to see here. Big rain coming the next 4 days or so. We need it, but I wanted to see the eclipse. Oh well there will be another in 2010.

Phretys
02-21-2008, 11:25 AM
Nevada just had a 6.3 quake this morning. http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm

About standing in doorways during quakes: I read somewhere that it is actually a bad idea, based on studies of building collapses due to quakes. If the top door frame comes apart, the entire wall above will come down like a guillotine.

Here's a PDF link (http://www.brattononline.com/earthquake.pdf) to a fascinating earthquake survival article.

Knitting_Guy
02-21-2008, 11:26 AM
Nevada just had a 6.3 quake this morning. http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm

About standing in doorways during quakes: I read somewhere that it is actually a bad idea, based on studies of building collapses due to quakes. If the top door frame comes apart, the entire wall above will come down like a guillotine.

I was just reading about that one. The entire Pacific plate appears to be quite busy these days.

Darcia
02-21-2008, 12:40 PM
Tornado: The 1987 Edmonton Tornado. My Dad worked in the Stelco Steel Mill and he had switched his shift with a man that was in an overhead crane that was taken right off. He survived and is now a quadriplegic. Dad and him are still friends. http://www.ee.ualberta.ca/~rob/tornado87.htm

Earthquake: I felt a few in Whitehorse, Yukon when living there. Rocking chairs rocking like crazy. And cars rocking and bouncing around on their tires.

photolady
02-21-2008, 12:59 PM
No dice on the lunar for me, it's been gloomy all day. I was in an earthquake in Tennessee a few years back (yep, TN is on a fault line). The epicenter was in Alabama somewhere and it followed the fault line up the Appalachians. Most bizarre thing I've ever experienced being a Florida gal myself. The whole house started shaking, you could hear the steel of our stairs going "tink, tink, tink". I thought it was cool, my husband kept telling me to shut up so he could hear if the house was going to collapse. :roflhard: The cat slept through it but was wildly paranoid a few days before, hiding under the bed, etc. She never does that, I'm guessing it was that animal instinct.
isn't that interesting, the cat being ballistic before it happened.
I find that fascinating. I wish WE had that kind of sense.
Alabama being the epicenter is amazing, too.

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:00 PM
a 6.3 earthquake in Wells, nevada, happened too.
Today, or last night.
anybody feel that? That was a big one.

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:02 PM
Tornado: The 1987 Edmonton Tornado. My Dad worked in the Stelco Steel Mill and he had switched his shift with a man that was in an overhead crane that was taken right off. He survived and is now a quadriplegic. Dad and him are still friends. http://www.ee.ualberta.ca/~rob/tornado87.htm

Earthquake: I felt a few in Whitehorse, Yukon when living there. Rocking chairs rocking like crazy. And cars rocking and bouncing around on their tires.

Oh my goodness! I'm so glad your dad is alive, and ok. I'm sure you are too. The crane was taken OFF? Those things are huge! The tornado was huge, too. How wide was it? The power of tornadoes is terrifying. Nothing to be casual about.

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:04 PM
Nevada just had a 6.3 quake this morning. http://quake.usgs.gov/recenteqs/latest.htm

About standing in doorways during quakes: I read somewhere that it is actually a bad idea, based on studies of building collapses due to quakes. If the top door frame comes apart, the entire wall above will come down like a guillotine.

Here's a PDF link (http://www.brattononline.com/earthquake.pdf) to a fascinating earthquake survival article.

Seems like there's no place to hide, in a big earthquake.

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:07 PM
Tornadoes- never hit personally, but heard them. In 2003, there was one just a few blocks from our house. It sounds like a big train. My husband told me it was the sirens that were losing power, but I knew from hearing them before. We had debris in our yard. It was really weird and very scary! That's the one that sticks out most in my mind, but there have been a few others very close to me.

I've been in quite a few huge thunderstorms. We had $1200 of damage done to our car with hail a couple of years ago. Not fun! We actually got hit twice that day. Ugh. First time we were home ready to leave for church but we stayed in so we wouldn't damage the van. The second time, I was out shopping. I'm so glad I wasn't on the road, but I was trapped in the center of Wal Mart for a while. Ugh.


No hurricanes or earthquakes for this midwest girl!

Kelly

Oh, man, I just noticed you live in the tornado alley area. Am I right? I wonder why THAT part of the U.S. is so favorable to tornadic activity?
We've had about 40 tornados and waterspouts this year. That's so unusual, too. Didn't used to be that way.
Are the tornados bigger in Kansas and Oklahoma? Why is that, if so?

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:14 PM
I live in southern CA so I've been in lots of them. I don't remember exactly what each one sounded or felt like. They can feel like a sharp jolt and shaking or they can be more rolling. Both have noise some of which is the house I suppose, but you can hear rumbling. When we feel something now we look at a hanging lamp and see if it's moving. If it is, it's an earthquake. They don't scare me anymore. Sometimes DH sleeps through them. Were still waiting for "The Big One".

Let's see... There are always lots of little ones that you barely feel...it's the ones over 6 that you really remember. The bigger ones I've been in....

The first one I ever felt was the Sylmar/San Fernando quake (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/states/events/1971_02_09.php) in 1971 which was a 6.6. I lived about 75 miles south I think. That one, being the first, was really scary. I was living at home at the time (still in HS) and it felt like the whole house was moving. My strongest memory of that one was watching my brothers come down the stairway and they were laughing their heads off. :teehee:

1992 - Lander's Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/landersq.html) June 28th 4:57 am registered 7.3
1992 - Big Bear Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/bigbear.html) June 28th 8:05 am registered 6.4
Yep, the two above were on the same morning. I got up with the first one and sat in the doorway. When it was over we watched the TV. Eventually we went back to bed only to be awakened by the second one. Sat in doorway again and then got up for good. Lots of shaking with both of them.

1994 - Northridge Quake (http://www.data.scec.org/chrono_index/northreq.html) registered 6.7
Lots of shaking, but nothing that I remember other than some major damage near the epicenter. One of my uncles lives in Northridge and he had major damage.

I watched the animation, and saw how entire portions of highway can be moved away. How can you plan your day, if you know the highway you have to drive on, might tear up while you;'re on it?
Do you have special preparedness days, like we have here, for e.q. survival skills?
The monitoring system, is it the best? Do they give alerts on, say, a weather channel station, or break in to the tv or radio, if an e.q. is beginning?
Oh, please be safe!! Now that I know people in Ca and tornado alley, I have something NEW to worry about!
What do you do to keep safe?
I have relatives in Texas, who have a tornado cellar, God forbid they should ever have to use it.
Is there a safe place, for people to run to, in case of a big e.q.?

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:21 PM
I guess if I had been better educated, I might have become a tornado chaser. And, a person who monitors and investigates possible earthquakes. Tracking hurricanes is interesting,too, but, you can just about tell where they will head, based on wind currents and water temps. I'm so glad NOAA can warn people so far in advance, so they can get away.

There's something fascinating, almost magnetic, to me, about tornados and earthquakes.:eyes: :oo: :thud:
When hubby and I were in Yellowstone, I was just in awe of the steam vents EVERYWHERE, and a bit nervous, with the knowledge that we were walking in the very caldera.
I have some great photos of yellowstone, too. Maybe if I can find them, I'll post a few. There was one place we went to, that had scalding hot, bubbling mud, and it smelled awful, like rotten sulphur!
To think of being that close to something so powerful and dangerous
really made the vacation so exciting.

photolady
02-21-2008, 01:25 PM
P.S. IF anyone sees a tornado, and you happen to have a camera, take a few still shots of it, and post them.
And, if you are in an earthquake, would you post some still shots of any damage you come across?

Is there really any way to protect yourself from a big earthquake?
besides moving?

What about building codes? Do all new home builders have to pass inspection to be up to standards for a certain level of earthquake tolerance?
I THINK, am not sure, that not all new home builders here are required by law to make a home hurricane sturdy. That's unfortunate.

lelvsdgs
02-21-2008, 01:59 PM
Having lived here in California for most of my life, I've been through many quakes. While you never get used to them, you do learn to stop and see, is this going to be "the big one"?

I've been through several that have collapsed freeways, including one in the Eureka area (in about 1980) that dropped a freeway overpass. Luckily, it was in the wee hours and no one was hurt.

The biggest one I remember was the Petrolia one in April of '92. We were in a town called Ferndale when the 7.6 quake hit. We saw houses (mostly Victorians) slide off their foundations, windows bending, telephone poles swaying and bending and the brick facade of a grocery store crash to the ground. We were there to watch a parade and just before the quake, all the horses began acting up. My ex (who was my husband at the time) was there shooting footage for a commercial and was rolling when it hit. He got some great footage that then was used on CNN during their reporting of the story. There were 3 or 4 more good sized quakes over the next day or two and some big fires.

My parents were living in Santa Cruz at the time of the Loma Prieta quake. The were lucky to only have minor cosmetic damage considering they were only a few blocks from down town. It devestated the down town area, turned it into a tent city for months and several people were killed. This is the same quake that dropped the freeway in Oakland, and the section of the Bay Bridge. They moved a few years later.

Darcia
02-21-2008, 02:10 PM
Oh my goodness! I'm so glad your dad is alive, and ok. I'm sure you are too. The crane was taken OFF? Those things are huge! The tornado was huge, too. How wide was it? The power of tornadoes is terrifying. Nothing to be casual about.

It was more than a mile wide. An interesting fact: The large tornado (the last one) In the movie with Helen Hunt 'Twister' was modeled after the Edmonton 1987 Tornado. It was on a Friday and known as 'Black Friday' there. They had the 20 year memorial last year.

Knitting_Guy
02-21-2008, 02:14 PM
Oh, man, I just noticed you live in the tornado alley area. Am I right? I wonder why THAT part of the U.S. is so favorable to tornadic activity?


http://www.windows.ucar.edu/cgi-bin/tour_def/earth/Atmosphere/tornado/alley.html

Wanda Witch
02-21-2008, 02:29 PM
I grew up in L.A., and also lived as a young woman in San Francisco. Have seen my share of earthquakes, some small and a few doozies. The weirdest one that I recall (did a lot of damage north of the L.A. area) I was driving home in the wee hours of the a.m. and fortunately no traffic. I could not understand what had happened to my car, a small sport variety,thought it blew a tire maybe, as it was all over the street. When I got home a couple of minutes later the tires were fine but the pictures on the wall in my mom's and my apartment told the story.

When DH and I moved to the Dallas area I was unaware it was in tornado alley, or was told this. Oh boy, I hope we never see one of those. Earthquakes I became accustomed to since most are not that violent but I would be terrified beyond words what to do in the event of a tornado. I don't know why they don't build more houses in this area with shelter in the event of a tornado.

knitncook
02-21-2008, 02:31 PM
I've sort of "collected" natural disasters. I've been in several earthquakes (in Spain, Japan and Oregon) as well as (too many) hurricanes, tornadoes, floods, and one blizzard. wee. I was about 5 miles from the epicenter of a 5.6 earthquake in '92. That was interesting. It actually "fixed" our house. It setteld the foundation and "fixed" a gap that was forming.

I saw on CNN this morning that there was one in NE Nevada. Anyone near that?

As far as tornados, I've seen far more than my fair share of those. The central Gulf Coast (particularly Mobile, Alabama and Pensacola, FL) have the highest volume of tornadic activity of anywhere else in the country. The difference between ours and those that you find in Kansas is that our's are usually F1's (very small) and my grandfather always called them "twisters" I never knew they were really tornados until I went to college! Seriously, I thought twister was just some sort of small wind funnel twisty thing. They don't take out entire towns like the big monsters (F4's and F5's) but the jump all over the place and will take out the house next you and the house across the street from you and the house 5 lots down and your house won't even looked like there was even a gust of wind! Those are very scary to me because they are so eradic and can pop up just about anywhere and "touch and go" across an entire county taking out random things. You can only sort of track them in that you can follow where the cell is heading, but not where the tornado is moving.

We had tornados in our area on Sunday and it damaged quite a few homes in the rural area just north of us. We have a NOAA weather radio and would not ever think of living without it. Because we don't watch much live TV we can actually miss weather alerts on TV (yay for DVR's) However, I did notice the other day when I was watching an upper (not local) channel that a weather alert played across the top of the screen. So maybe the cable and satellite services are finding ways of alerting people when they are watching non-local channels and maybe even their DVR?

evona
02-21-2008, 03:03 PM
I watched the animation, and saw how entire portions of highway can be moved away. How can you plan your day, if you know the highway you have to drive on, might tear up while you;'re on it?
Do you have special preparedness days, like we have here, for e.q. survival skills?
The monitoring system, is it the best? Do they give alerts on, say, a weather channel station, or break in to the tv or radio, if an e.q. is beginning?
Oh, please be safe!! Now that I know people in Ca and tornado alley, I have something NEW to worry about!
What do you do to keep safe?
I have relatives in Texas, who have a tornado cellar, God forbid they should ever have to use it.
Is there a safe place, for people to run to, in case of a big e.q.?

Well, here in California we never know when "the BIG one" or even a big one might hit, but we go about our days and most people don't worry about it. You have to do that, or you really wouldn't be able to live anywhere would you? I mean, even warnings aren't necessarily accurate and I have heard of tornadoes that have had deadly effect simply because they occurred so quickly that people couldn't hear nor heed warnings. And there of course have been hurricanes that didn't hit the place expected and instead caused massive destruction elsewhere. There is no advanced earthquake warning, but we live through them, we pick up the pieces, mourn the lost, heal the wounded and then eventually get up take the kids to school and go to work like the rest of the world :)

As far as special preparedness days, I do recall earthquake drills at school (as a matter of fact if you look at my last post I recalled the Whittier earthquake which occurred on a day that we were supposed to have an earthquake drill . . .lol). The building I work in has emergency exit drills twice a year. I always hear public announcements about having water, canned foods, batteries, flashlights, emergency radios, blankets, etc ready in case of an emergency, but honestly I don't think many people heed those warnings.

I live 1/4 mile from a disaster meeting center and both of my teenage children know that if I'm not home (I'm a single working mom) and its safe to go outside to go there to meet me. I don't want them staying home with possible gas leaks, etc if there's a safer place close by and in the case of an emergency I will likely have no ability to contact them by phone to instruct them. I also have an area of my home where they can stay until rescue arrives if I'm not home and they are trapped by downed lines, broken beams, etc. I've gone over with them time and again what constitutes "safe to go outside" and I can only hope they won't go running out of fear into danger, but I think they are pretty well taught :)

I have not known one person who lived through an earthquake who gained any significant instruction from a warning system or the emergency alert system. In my anecdotal experience most people are caught in a place where they are not listening to radios or watching t.v. and quite often things like electricity go out in bad disasters. For instance: my mom was on a bus in San Francisco when the Loma Prieta e.q. hit and most people were in bed when the 1994 Northridge quake hit (fortunately for most). My boyfriend was camping in the redwoods when the Petrolia e.q. hit and he said the entire forest swayed like it was on a big boat. I was actually "discussing" with my ex about my moving out when the Petrolia e.q hit :roflhard: Very dramatic!!!!!! Although I was in Redding and we didn't feel it quite as much there.

Of course, later, after the shaking has stopped there is usually useful advice about shelters, numbers to call if you're looking for loved ones, etc.

Thanks for your concern about us here in CA and Tornado Alley. Hopefully it will be for naught :thumbsup:

Jan in CA
02-21-2008, 03:23 PM
I watched the animation, and saw how entire portions of highway can be moved away. How can you plan your day, if you know the highway you have to drive on, might tear up while you;'re on it?
Do you have special preparedness days, like we have here, for e.q. survival skills?
The monitoring system, is it the best? Do they give alerts on, say, a weather channel station, or break in to the tv or radio, if an e.q. is beginning?
Oh, please be safe!! Now that I know people in Ca and tornado alley, I have something NEW to worry about!
What do you do to keep safe?
I have relatives in Texas, who have a tornado cellar, God forbid they should ever have to use it.
Is there a safe place, for people to run to, in case of a big e.q.?

As Evona said there really isn't any warning system at this time. It is talked about and they do try, but so far they haven't been particularly successful. Last night they talked to Kate Hutton from Cal Tech (she's an earthquake expert) about all the activity the last month on the CA/Mex border and she doesn't think it's a precursor to anything larger, but she admits they don't know for sure.

What do we do? Well, we go about our lives just like everyone else. Do I think about it when I go over those big freeway over-crossings? Definitely. You can't live in fear though. Our children have earthquake drills (as did I as a kid) and are taught to get under the desk during the quake and then to file out calmly single file to the field away from the building. Going to the field during the calm is a good idea in case of an aftershock.

Here at home we have all tall/heavy bookcases bolted to the wall so in the event of a large quake they won't fall on anyone. We have a cabinet in the garage that we keep as an extra pantry of sorts. I don't have food in there as emergency food and we do go through it, but there is almost always water and food should something happen. I realize that it's possible I wouldn't be able to even get to it, but we do what we can.

photolady
02-22-2008, 10:36 AM
My boyfriend was camping in the redwoods when the Petrolia e.q. hit and he said the entire forest swayed like it was on a big boat. ...
Thanks for your concern about us here in CA and Tornado Alley. Hopefully it will be for naught :thumbsup:


When I see videos of everything swaying, it seems surreal.

Must be quite an experience to file away in your mind.

photolady
02-22-2008, 10:37 AM
Here at home we have all tall/heavy bookcases bolted to the wall so in the event of a large quake they won't fall on anyone. We have a cabinet in the garage that we keep as an extra pantry of sorts. I don't have food in there as emergency food and we do go through it, but there is almost always water and food should something happen. I realize that it's possible I wouldn't be able to even get to it, but we do what we can.

Thanks for that information. I hope you and your family are protected and safe from all harm. In the event of any disaster.

photolady
02-22-2008, 10:39 AM
I've been through several that have collapsed freeways, including one in the Eureka area (in about 1980) that dropped a freeway overpass. Luckily, it was in the wee hours and no one was hurt.

The biggest one I remember was the Petrolia one in April of '92. We were in a town called Ferndale when the 7.6 quake hit. We saw houses (mostly Victorians) slide off their foundations, windows bending, telephone poles swaying and bending and the brick facade of a grocery store crash to the ground. We were there to watch a parade and just before the quake, all the horses began acting up. My ex (who was my husband at the time) was there shooting footage for a commercial and was rolling when it hit. He got some great footage that then was used on CNN during their reporting of the story. There were 3 or 4 more good sized quakes over the next day or two and some big fires.

My parents were living in Santa Cruz at the time of the Loma Prieta quake. The were lucky to only have minor cosmetic damage considering they were only a few blocks from down town. It devestated the down town area, turned it into a tent city for months and several people were killed. This is the same quake that dropped the freeway in Oakland, and the section of the Bay Bridge. They moved a few years later.
Wow, and there you go, again saying about the animals acting up, acting weirdly, before the quake.
Has any scientist pinpointed the thing in animals that allows them to know ahead of time of an e.q.?

photolady
02-22-2008, 10:40 AM
It was more than a mile wide. An interesting fact: The large tornado (the last one) In the movie with Helen Hunt 'Twister' was modeled after the Edmonton 1987 Tornado. It was on a Friday and known as 'Black Friday' there. They had the 20 year memorial last year.


I saw that movie twice. Didn't know it was about a REAL tornado.

Twenty year memorial....I didn't know about that, either.

KnitWit1987
02-22-2008, 11:01 AM
I am absolutly terrified of tornados. I grew up in Illionois right down the street from an airport. My biggest memory as a child is the tornado sirens going off. For some reason, hardly anyone there had basements so we would always go to the laundry room. One time I remember going outside with my mom while the sirens were going off and there were 5 tornados, one in every direction of our house. Thankfully, I was never actually in one but man its scary. That is one of the many reasons I will probably never move from Colorado. There is ocasionally tornados here but only in rural areas.

Darcia
02-22-2008, 12:44 PM
I have never been in or seen a Hurricane. Just little earthquakes and that one tornado that did not hit where I lived. What is it like in a hurricane? I heard that there can be tornado's in a hurricane.

A few hurricanes hit Atlantic Canada but I have not been here long enough to experience any. I heard that the predictions say this year is to be above average for hurricanes.

photolady
02-23-2008, 07:33 PM
I am absolutly terrified of tornados. I grew up in Illionois right down the street from an airport. My biggest memory as a child is the tornado sirens going off. For some reason, hardly anyone there had basements so we would always go to the laundry room. One time I remember going outside with my mom while the sirens were going off and there were 5 tornados, one in every direction of our house. Thankfully, I was never actually in one but man its scary. That is one of the many reasons I will probably never move from Colorado. There is ocasionally tornados here but only in rural areas.


Man you poor thing! :sad: You saw 5 tornados at one time?

photolady
02-23-2008, 07:42 PM
I have never been in or seen a Hurricane. Just little earthquakes and that one tornado that did not hit where I lived. What is it like in a hurricane? I heard that there can be tornado's in a hurricane.

A few hurricanes hit Atlantic Canada but I have not been here long enough to experience any. I heard that the predictions say this year is to be above average for hurricanes.

Yeah, the edges of the hurricane spawn tornadoes. Hurricanes, though, are giant wind and water machines, mercilessly dumping tons, (really) of water down at once, and the winds are nonstop.
http://images.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://img.coxnewsweb.com/B/01/36/62/image_62361.gif&imgrefurl=http://www.palmbeachpost.com/storm/content/storm/about/anatomy.html&h=229&w=280&sz=15&tbnid=pdOR90W--n-K5M:&tbnh=93&tbnw=114&prev=/images%3Fq%3Danatomy%2Bof%2Ba%2Bhurricane%26um%3D1&start=2&sa=X&oi=images&ct=image&cd=2

You hear this howling, thru any cracks in the house, and it wails on and on and on.
Then, the eye comes, and it's all clear, and you can go out side, (they tell you not to), and see blue sky. Then, the second wall comes, attacking the whole area.
Hurricanes cause so much coastal damage!! I've NEVER wanted to live at, or own property on, an Atlantic beach. I see the huge motels on the SAND, right on the beach, and think, "Must be nice to have so much money, you can gamble like that".

Think about this, a category 5 hurricane is like a GIANT tornado. That's scary. If one heads this way, that's panic time.
http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/aboutsshs.shtml

Oh, if you watch, this summer, the satellite images of hurricanes, look at the eye formations. http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/rsd/images/andrewSequence_lg.jpg
See how you can see the land beneath, in the eye? That was a dangerous hurricane. It kept it's strength up, and tore up the land.
here's floyd: http://rsd.gsfc.nasa.gov/rsd/images/Floyd/Floyd_19990914_1259_md.jpg
it weakened a lot, down to a cat 2, which is not much to worry about.

sorry if this was too long, but, I get excited about telling others about hurricanes.

evona
02-23-2008, 10:26 PM
Those satellite images are terrifying!!! :out: Its just so too massive to get my head around.

I remember when we had the Whittier earthquake we had a girl who's parents were so frightened they packed up and moved to Florida (I think they were originally from there). My thought was "What, are they crazy!! They have hurricanes there." Its funny how our perceptions are altered by our surroundings.

As a child I figured that hurricanes happened so much more often than big earthquakes it would be impossible to not live life on the edge of a nervous breakdown. Now I understand that some people think that the unpredictability of an earthquake is a lot more nerve wracking.

Debkcs
02-24-2008, 01:06 AM
Great thread, thanks for starting it.

The 1971 Sylmar earthquake was a big one for all of Southern California. I'd gone to my parents house that morning, fell asleep in my brothers' vacant bed. About three minutes later, the quake started and I was rudely awoken by his huge aquarium falling on my head. Water, fish and glass everywhere. When the quake had subsided, he came running in and started shouting "My fish, my poor fish!" I was bleeding from a head wound that required seventeen stitches, but he was worried about his fish. :??

I've never been bothered by earthquakes when they are happening, just take shelter if possible. I worry about others in tornadoes and hurricanes.

photolady
02-24-2008, 04:44 PM
Those satellite images are terrifying!!! :out: Its just so too massive to get my head around.

.

Yes, they are!!

A scary thing happened to us, when a giant hurricane passed near us.
We looked up into the night sky, and saw these perfectly symmetrical bands of clouds silently, slowly whirling over our house, over the whole neighborhood.
My husband told me to look up, and it was like some horrible monster was sliding by.
Those were the outer bands of one of the MOST destructive hurricanes in history. It was such a bad hurricane, it's name was retired permanently.
Hard to describe the helplessness you feel, in the path of a monster.

photolady
02-24-2008, 04:46 PM
Great thread, thanks for starting it.

You're welcome. I think we're all in awe of the power of nature.
Tsunamis come to mind.

I was rudely awoken by his huge aquarium falling on my head. Water, fish and glass everywhere. When the quake had subsided, he came running in and started shouting "My fish, my poor fish!"

Ah, yes, sibling love and concern.