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View Full Version : learning continental is killing me!


rox_on2
04-17-2008, 09:41 AM
I'm an english knitter trying to learn contenintal. This is harder than anything I have done in a long time! I feel like I am the most uncoordinated person in the world!!!!!!! Aggggh!

What method did you learn and what method do you use?
Any tips for me would be greatly appreciated.

redheadrachel
04-17-2008, 09:45 AM
Just keep doing it. It's awkward because you haven't practiced... lol sorry I don't have a more profound tip, but it's true

dustinac
04-17-2008, 09:47 AM
I started out knitting English but after some time passed, I still felt very frustrated and not comfy...so I watched Amy's videos on Continental...it does come in handy to know both when I'm doing colorwork and English no longer feels weird to me...I would just keep practicing :thumbsup:

Also, for the continental purl I would suggest looking at Amy's Norwegian Purling (http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/purl-stitch)video...:thumbsup:

Knitting_Guy
04-17-2008, 09:48 AM
I also find it awkward, but do use the technique when doing stranding. It does feel a bit more natural the more you do it, but I do still mainly knit English.

suzeeq
04-17-2008, 10:20 AM
You don't have to learn continental if you're doing okay english style. One isn't better than another, just different, and you should use whatever's more comfortable for you.

redheadrachel
04-17-2008, 11:25 AM
Still, I would give it a fair chance before deciding you definitely like one better than the other. I tried knitting Continental for like, just a couple rounds of something and was like Nope, don't like it, it's slow. But I was just not used to it. I forced myself to make a pair of socks in conti just so I would really give it a fair shot, and I ended up loving it way more.
Anything is going to feel awkward when you're doing it for the first time. I'd say the same thing to people who knit English. :happydance:Might as well give it a shot, you might like it. If not, then just use English.

Momto G B and H
04-17-2008, 11:34 AM
I have tried several times to knit "Continental" (well, I do carry my yarn in my right hand but I throw it and I wanted to learn to pick it). Then one day I just decided that there is NOTHING wrong with the way I knit, I knit really fast even if it looks weird and it works for me. So I'm not going to change.
But I did give it a fair shake, and I watched lots of different people and tried all their ways before I gave up.

Newbie2Knitting
04-17-2008, 12:11 PM
I learned English first but wanted to try Continental b/c ribbing took me so flipping long to do and Conti just looked faster all around. I watched Amy's videos and just couldn't pick it up for the life of me - I'm far too uncoordinated.:pout: Someone on KH linked to this (http://youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY)YouTube video and it helped me out. It still felt really awkward for a while, but I kept at it and now I prefer it. I can be pretty dang speedy if I do say so myself. That being said, stick with whatever you're comfy with. It's not a contest, it's purely for your enjoyment.

Wanda Witch
04-17-2008, 12:14 PM
I knit English, recently learned continental and was feeling quite comfortable with the method after practicing for quite some time, and yes, it felt very awkward at first. However, began an afghan, bulky-as-all-get-out yarn (using two at the same time) and just did not feel 'right' using the continental - so back to the throwing. I think it is the size needle, 17, along with the bulky yarn giving me the problem with the continental. I won't give up, it took too long to feel good with what I was knitting with the method but will stick it out on this project with the original way.

GinnyG
04-17-2008, 12:23 PM
You don't have to learn continental if you're doing okay english style. One isn't better than another, just different, and you should use whatever's more comfortable for you.
ABSOLUTLEY AGREE!!!!!!!!!!!!!

suzeeq
04-17-2008, 12:39 PM
However, began an afghan, bulky-as-all-get-out yarn (using two at the same time) and just did not feel 'right' using the continental - so back to the throwing. I think it is the size needle, 17, along with the bulky yarn giving me the problem with the continental.

Yeah, I would think heavy yarn and large needles would be more difficult continental. I wonder.... do most contis use thin yarn and small needles more than english knitters do?

KnittingNoob
04-17-2008, 12:46 PM
I learned English first, then Continental, then Irish Cottage (YarnHarlot's method) and I'm sticking with the Irish Cottage since it feels the most natural and doesn't cause hand pain (Continental purl hurt my index finger from pivoting so much)

heatherg23
04-17-2008, 12:50 PM
English...

I only started knitting 6 weeks ago. The dvd I got shows both, but I only use English. I tried to do continential but it just wasn't happenin'.

I'm going to stick to english..Good luck

Lisa R.
04-17-2008, 01:00 PM
Still, I would give it a fair chance before deciding you definitely like one better than the other. I tried knitting Continental for like, just a couple rounds of something and was like Nope, don't like it, it's slow. But I was just not used to it. I forced myself to make a pair of socks in conti just so I would really give it a fair shot, and I ended up loving it way more.
Anything is going to feel awkward when you're doing it for the first time. I'd say the same thing to people who knit English. :happydance:Might as well give it a shot, you might like it. If not, then just use English.

I just wanted to "pile on" here--it's always worthwhile giving things enough time to really see.

I was learning entrelac, and was taught to knit backwards, so as not to constantly be turning to purl--tried it, and thought it was ridiculously slow. So, I kept turning and turning my scarf while the rest of my class learned to do it backwards. Finally, when the scarf got to a certain bulkiness, the turning really was awkward...so I decided to practice for an entire pattern repeat. Bottom line...I got the hang of it and it was a really great skill to learn. I love it now.

By the same token, I gave dpns a short trial and wasn't too sure about them. Recently, I had opportunity to really use them again, and decided, in fact, I was right--I'd much rather use two circs. But I *can* use dpns, and I *know* rather than assume that dpns aren't my favorite.

I haven't made any decision on magic loop yet because I only tried it for a short time (couple of rows). One day, I'll give it a go for real and see.

BTW---<said with sheepish grin>I haven't actually learned continental yet, so I may need to take my own advice and give it a go!

Jan in CA
04-17-2008, 02:03 PM
You don't have to learn continental if you're doing okay english style. One isn't better than another, just different, and you should use whatever's more comfortable for you.

Exactly. I started continental and then went to english because it was faster and easier for me. I do use both hands when stranding though and it works fine for that.

xxkarenlxx
04-17-2008, 02:43 PM
When I originally taught myself to knit I used the English method. That said, I didn't knit very long (only one project) and when I picked it back up twenty something years later and a couple weeks ago Continental feels more comfortable. I will also offer that I've yet to find a way to hold the yarn that feels comfortable so I hold it in my palm and throw it over the needle similarly to the way that it is done in English.

I wonder if Continental feels more natural to me because I've crocheted for my whole life.

blueygh2
04-17-2008, 02:46 PM
I like continental, was english knitter before as well, and at first it was awkward as well to me, but learned continental and now I'm happy I did. It flows more quickly for me.

gargoylelib
04-17-2008, 03:27 PM
I started out with Continental and have recently been teaching
myself English to use with two color knitting. I can not for the life
of me figure out purling with the English method but doesn't really
matter! :) Just echoing what everyone else is saying...need to
give it a bit of time and practice and just use whatever method you
feel most comfortable with!

Libbie

blueygh2
04-17-2008, 04:41 PM
I can not for the life
of me figure out purling with the English method but doesn't really
matter!

I taught myself continental purling, because I was not happy to have to switch back to english knitting when doing something that involved knitting and purling.

Knit4Fun
04-17-2008, 06:32 PM
It's really just a matter of comfort and preference. I was happy with English until I noticed my right wrist getting REALLY sore from it, so I tried to learn Continental. It was kind of hard for me since it didn't feel right to hold the working yarn wrapped around my finger the way the videos all show...so I kept playing around until I found a hold that kept my yarn tension even. What I do now that is super easy and comfortable (for me anyway) is to wrap the working yarn around my left middle finger at the knuckle (instead of all the way up by your hand) and then wrap it over the second finger again by the knuckle. Hope that makes sense.

Really, just do whatever you enjoy most and gives you the most comfort. It's all good! :muah:

lactosefree
04-17-2008, 07:13 PM
Also, for the continental purl I would suggest looking at Amy's Norwegian Purling (http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/purl-stitch)video...:thumbsup:


Thanks for posting this! I think the last time I looked at the purling video page the Norwegian style wasn't up yet. I :heart: it! Yay, a new way to purl!

dustinac
04-17-2008, 07:25 PM
Yeah, I would think heavy yarn and large needles would be more difficult continental. I wonder.... do most contis use thin yarn and small needles more than english knitters do?

I tend to knit with thinner yarn...for some reason bulky and larger needles really hurt when I knit with them not really harder to do...just very uncomfy...I never thought to change to English though...I'll give that a try next time :thumbsup:

Thanks for posting this! I think the last time I looked at the purling video page the Norwegian style wasn't up yet. I :heart: it! Yay, a new way to purl!

:yay: I was doing the continental purl and although I wasn't having any trouble with it, I didn't care much for it (I used my thumb 'cause my middle finger just wouldn't help that yarn over...so a few days ago I was looking around and found that video...I'm working on a top with a lot of purl sts and it's a lot easier/faster to do :happydance:

suzeeq
04-17-2008, 10:14 PM
I can not for the life of me figure out purling with the English method but doesn't really matter!

When purling english you use exactly the same motion over the needle as knitting. It's just that your tip is point to the front left instead of the back left.

Becky Morgan
04-17-2008, 10:16 PM
I'll have to put that video on my "when you go to the library that has broadband" list. Right now I'm halfway through a sweater in moss stitch and all that switching back and forth is driving me NUTS.

I agree with most of you--do what feels right, not what you think the Knitting Police want. If it doesn't hurt your hands and you're getting the result you (not anyone else, YOU) want, it's a Good Thing. TRying out new techniques is part of the fun, but if you don't like them, nobody is allowed to make you!

I learned to crochet first, too, and everyone around here seems to knit not only English, but with a wrist-twisting variation and very, very hard, tight gauge. That won't work for me. Thick yarn doesn't seem to be a problem,--I don't like a lot of the projects that are made with the clothesline-sized yarn and great big needles, but it isn't harder to work with or anything. Really fine yarn is more of a problem for these stiff hands--I can;t do much thread crochet, either.

Constance123
04-17-2008, 10:26 PM
Hi,
Constance here. I was an English knitter until I was 30. At that time I was living in Germany (AF wife). My landlandy saw me throwing my thread with my right hand and said "ach, you Americans, you waste so much time, here do it this way". She just took it from me and showed me the continental way. You have to let go of the grip and really knit looser. I hold my tension with my left index finger. It took me one solid year to stop picking up the knitting the English way. It takes forever. But finally you will forget the old English way. Stick with it. Make yourself do this. But releasing your work and knitting very loose will help a lot. You will find you like it a lot better. Also, working with only round needles has helped. Good Luck. Let me know how it's going.
Love
Constance

zkimom
04-18-2008, 07:29 AM
Ok, let me throw this onto the pile. I learned knitting continental (actually combined but I didn't know the difference at the time, all I knew was I held my yarn in my left hand) and I knit that way until last year when I wanted to start teaching knitting classes. I had heard that it was easier to learn knitting English style (although Kelley Petkun disagrees) and that's how both my kids were learning at school so I thought I'd give it a try.

I picked it up fairly quickly and now, I love knitting both ways. There's something very meditative and relaxing about doing a garter stitch scarf and knitting English. If I were to knit garter and use continental, I knit too fast and kind of miss the pleasure of the stitch along the way.

That being said, I don't purl well English style and much prefer continental for stitches that require me to mix knits and purls. That includes anything other than straight stockinette or garter.

Really, it's all about the knitting.

And I just wanted to add that my garter stitch is much more even since I've been knitting English. I never liked doing garter stitch continental style. My rows always came out kind of wonky and uneven. When I garter English style my rows are nice and straight. Maybe it has to do with the way the stitches sit on the needle when I knit them off but it's much easier for me to work them English.

gargoylelib
04-18-2008, 07:35 AM
When purling english you use exactly the same motion over the needle as knitting. It's just that your tip is point to the front left instead of the back left.

Yeah, I know this in theory but when it comes to the practice my
brain just sorta goes on holiday and I sit there with drool coming
out the side of my mouth! :rofl: I can purl any way I've come
across so far in continental but for some reason english does
not click.

Libbie :)

suzeeq
04-18-2008, 08:57 AM
Silly Libbie ! :rofl: hee hee

1to1
04-18-2008, 01:05 PM
I learned English and every now and then will knit Cont but then switch back. I know that I need to stick with it longer (like for a whole dishcloth) but it seems that when I finish a row I switch back on the next row without realizing it.

IMO, I honestly don't think any one way is better but agree that it is useful to know many different ways.

rox_on2
04-18-2008, 11:06 PM
Wow, I didn't expect such response!
Thank you all for your input!

I really don't mind my throwing style that much as I am very comfortable.
I probably wouldn't ever know the difference, were it not for the internet. Seeing how others do it though, made me realise it can be done more efficiently/faster! So I just want to learn it.

I had my knitting with me at work today and my Irish client whom I know to be a knitter was asking about the project I'm working on. I'm doing 2 toe up on 1 circ magic loop.
I whatched her doing some knitting last time she was in and was quite impressed. She holds her yarn in her right hand but doesn't throw, but rather shifts the yarn using her right index finger, much like you might do in continental....
Anyway, she wanted to understand what I was doing with the magic loop so I had her do some stitches her way meanwhile I showed her what I've been practicing to learn conti.

It was fun!
I'm gonna keep at it and one day I'll be a pro!

Thanks again

suzeeq
04-18-2008, 11:23 PM
Most of us `throwers' don't really `throw' the yarn. What's shown in a lot of how to videos, with the hand leaving the needle completely is not what we do. Mostly just skim the needle with the right hand, while flexing/flicking out the yarn with the index finger. That comes with practice, so just keep practicing.... ;)

rox_on2
04-18-2008, 11:34 PM
Right on. She is more of a flicker....and by huge contrast I am straight up a thrower with the whole arm and shoulder! Just seems like alot of movement for such a small stitch, hence my desire to learn something new! = )

Plantgoddess+
04-19-2008, 09:42 AM
Whether you decide to continue on with learning continental or keep practicing english until you too become a flicker either way experience and practice should increase your speed. Just remember though it will cost you more in yarn as you finish projects faster.

GinnyG
04-19-2008, 11:27 AM
I'm a die hard English knitter. Other than for color work I see no need to learn continental. I don't "throw" my yarn. my elbows are both comfortably at my side, shoulders don't move and the yarn is controled by my index finger with a minimal of movement.

My suggestion is you work on keeping you body more still and knit with your finger not your entire body. Neither english or continenetal is going to be fast if you are using your entire upper body.

Becky Morgan
04-19-2008, 12:59 PM
Most of us `throwers' don't really `throw' the yarn. What's shown in a lot of how to videos, with the hand leaving the needle completely is not what we do.


There, that's it! Only through the Net have I come to realize that English knitting doesn't have to be the full-body contact Olympic sport it is around here. The books I tried to learn from (no videos back in 1970 or so) all showed the same movement the local knitters use--just about drop the needle, throw the yarn with the whole right arm, use the right wrist to twist it around the needle, pull the stitch off (and I mean PULL) and give the yarn a sharp yank with each stitch to "set it on the needle". Some of the old knitting projects I find at Goodwill and such are stiff as cardboard from the incredibly tight gauge. For instance, there's a cuff from something that came in a bag of yarn. It's worsted weight, probably acrylic, 6 stitches to the inch...and that's one of the softer ones. I can't find the one swatch to measure it right now, but it will literally stand up by itself. There's no way I can knit that tight or pull the yarn that hard with every stitch. Not surprisingly, most knitters don't finish a lot of projects and spend a lot of time comparing notes on carpal tunnel surgery, frozen shoulder manipulation and cortisone shots. How on earth do things like that get started?

Debkcs
04-19-2008, 03:53 PM
IMO, I honestly don't think any one way is better but agree that it is useful to know many different ways.


Again, this has been a really interesting thread to read. We've done it before, and I'm sure we'll do it again, but everytime I learn something new.

I'll never be as fast, but now I want to learn Irish Cottage knitting.

As far as English vs. continental, continental works best for left-handed me. English just feels clumsy.

ShowDucky81
04-19-2008, 04:19 PM
I was in the waiting room knitting while my sister was in surgery and there was another lady knitting herself. She told me that English style will kill my elbows and should consider learning continental. I didn't feel like I was killing my elbows at all and felt quite relaxed. This puzzled me so much. Everyone here says that whatever style fits you best is the one you should go with. I would like to try continental style because it does seem like it's more efficient.

:/

suzeeq
04-19-2008, 05:55 PM
Pertaining to whole arm/shoulder movement in english style....

How on earth do things like that get started?

I dunno, it could be that in the how to videos that show completely letting go the needle it's hard to slow down to show how the yarn wraps around the needle and through the stitch. Or the people who make them are really continental knitters and don't know english well or that's the style they were taught. There's a couple video on YouTube that show a much more efficient way to knit english and it's similar to how I do it.

Terrycap
04-30-2008, 08:45 AM
I originally learned to knit the continental way many years ago. I grew frustrated with it and quickly put the needles down. Recently I wanted to try again but was convinced I needed to learn the English style. I found someone to teach me and I hated it. It seems so awkward compared to continental. As someone else mentioned there is no right or wrong way. The tension gets better as you practice. To me that was the biggest problem. I love the videos on this site that help show me the stitches. I don't know any knitters in my community that knit continental so I rely on the videos to help me. I am still a beginner but love it and will keep going forward.

bopscopbird
11-26-2008, 03:08 AM
I'm new to this forum, so hello fellow knitters!:waving: I've been a knitter for about 8 or so years, and I've always used the English method, using my wrist and hand to throw the yarn. On a whim I decided to look up the Continental method, because I'd heard that it was much faster than the English method. Let me tell you, I've watched videos and read instructions and looked at diagrams and I CANNOT knit Continental whatsoever. The working yarn keeps scooting off my fingers no matter how many times I wrap it around my five digits, and the tension in my stitches gets all messed up. HOW ON EARTH can anyone knit that way??? Anyway, I'm definitely going back to English so that I can actually get something done! :)

Ronda
11-26-2008, 07:07 AM
The video posted above and Amy's videos here are how I switched from English to Continental. It took me a while to get the purl part. I enjoy it, but I have noticed that my tension has changed A LOT. When I knit English, I'm a much tighter knitter. I bet I'd have to go down at least 2 needle sizes to get gauge with Continental.

About the "throwing" with the right hand in English, I was one of those whose hand completely left the needle, I think. I'll have to get out some yarn and needles and give it a try to say for sure. I'm curious about those of you who knit English and don't throw. I feel like I have more control over my tension when I knit English, but I prefer Continental because it's less arm movement for me. I'd love to see how some of you knit English without your right hand leaving the needle.

suzeeq
11-26-2008, 10:29 AM
Some people knit combination style, where you also hold the yarn in your left hand. I believe there's a few videos here for it, and more explanations at www.anniemodesitt.com

Speed comes with practice, a person can knit just as fast english as continental. You don't have to actually move your whole hand around the needle when knitting english either. There are several videos on Youtube that show various ways of knitting english, just do a search for knit english.

dairywife
11-26-2008, 11:38 AM
I wonder if Continental feels more natural to me because I've crocheted for my whole life.

I completely agree with the Crochet theory. I taught myself to knit and used the english method with the throwing of the yarn because wrapping on my right fingers never felt comfortable. I can knit pretty fast doing this too. I discovered this site and started watching the different video's and tried the continental method and it felt comfortable right away. I think it is because I have been crocheting so many years and the wrapping around the left hand comes so natural.

Just throwing in my two cents.

Practice the method you like and if after trying/attemting it is uncomfortable then don't use that method.

thecanfield
11-26-2008, 03:19 PM
I knit english style.
I have tried continental and just prefer what I know.

Plantgoddess+
11-26-2008, 05:07 PM
When knitting English I work up at the tip of the needles so that it's just a matter of tipping the right hand towards the needle tips and flicking the yarn around the needle with the index finger. I still hold the work with the other fingers and thumb of the right hand.

suzeeq
11-26-2008, 09:46 PM
That's something how I do it too. I extend out my index finger and my hand still touches the needle.

RuthieinMaryland
12-01-2008, 06:47 AM
Hi! :waving:

When I first started learning Continental it was SO awkward!!! But part of it was I was holding the yarn wrong. Then I found this video and suddenly it all came together!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XuRLFl36tDY&feature=related

If you're trying to learn continental I'd highly recommend you watch this. I'm so glad I did because I now use continental and things go so smoothly and FAST!!!

Good luck and happy knitting! :knitting:
Ruthie

AAngels
12-01-2008, 11:22 AM
I learned English and will keep on doing it so much easier than the other way to me.
Just seems awkward for me.

Thanks
Kathy

LadyFirelyght
12-01-2008, 12:59 PM
I found when I was first learning to knit that I really preferred knitting Continental. I've used it for most of my projects but I also learned English just for the sake of being able to use it to do stranding work. It's still awkward and I don't like it (makes me feel lopsided, having my right hand do almost all the work), but I can do it. It just takes a lot of practice. It's almost like learning how to knit from the beginning lol

Jeremy
12-01-2008, 01:10 PM
I have noticed that my tension has changed A LOT. When I knit English, I'm a much tighter knitter. I bet I'd have to go down at least 2 needle sizes to get gauge with Continental.

That is exactly what happened to me.

LadyFirelyght
12-01-2008, 01:14 PM
do most contis use thin yarn and small needles more than english knitters do?
I don't. I use a lot of bulky weight yarns and big needles. My first afghan was made with SUPER bulky yarn and size 19 circs!
I haven't made any decision on magic loop yet because I only tried it for a short time (couple of rows). One day, I'll give it a go for real and see.
Magic loop is AWESOME. I'm making my first pair of socks with it and it is so easy to do.
What I do now that is super easy and comfortable (for me anyway) is to wrap the working yarn around my left middle finger at the knuckle (instead of all the way up by your hand) and then wrap it over the second finger again by the knuckle. Hope that makes sense.

Really, just do whatever you enjoy most and gives you the most comfort. It's all good! :muah:
Yeah, I can't stand the way it shows in the video. Maybe it's because I have really small hands or something, but my left hand is always cramping within minutes! Bottom line: Do what works for you!

blueygh2
12-01-2008, 02:55 PM
For magic loop, I really like the technique because it only requires ONE circular needle... and I almost only have circs... (Better for my wrists and the train passengers)

And, I use thin yarn with thick needles. At the beginning (I can remember) it was quite ... strange... I thought to myself, how can one knit such thin yarn with such big needles, but now I've grown accustomed to it, and I really like working lace works....

My technique for holding yarn is the same for knitting and crochet, I put the yarn over the index finger, below middle finger, above ring finger and below pinky, ... that gives me a good tension....

Ronda
12-02-2008, 07:50 AM
My technique for holding yarn is the same for knitting and crochet, I put the yarn over the index finger, below middle finger, above ring finger and below pinky, ... that gives me a good tension....

Thanks for sharing that. I might try it.

Wannie
12-02-2008, 10:13 AM
Had learned to "throw"as a child. Took a class from an amazing knitter who taught continental and I :heart: love it!. I crocheted for many years and it was a natural for me. But, like everyone has said, if it doesn't work....just be happy and knit away.:heart:

OffJumpsJack
12-02-2008, 11:07 AM
You don't have to learn continental if you're doing okay English style. One isn't better than another, just different, and you should use whatever's more comfortable for you.


What? :oo: Well, I guess if you are fast as an English style knitter then you don't have to learn continental. ;)

Learning is just setting up a muscle memory pattern. When you have an existing muscle memory pattern, it is 'twitching' to do it your old way. Learning a new pattern first requires a thought to stop the old, instinctive twitch and then another commanding the new movement pattern. It take longer because you need to do double duty until the new pattern becomes instinctive to the muscles. Sometime you need to jog the old pattern out of the muscles before you can set up the new pattern of 'twitches.'

I first learned to crochet; the left hand holds and tensions the yarn while the right hand hooks the yarn, draws up the loops, and pulls through the stitches. I can not recall ever seeing anyone crochet in an English style.

My technique for holding yarn is the same for knitting and crochet, I put the yarn over the index finger, below middle finger, above ring finger and below pinky, ... that gives me a good tension....
Yes, my technique is the same; though I'd also say I use the 'knife grip' on the hook which is much like how I hold the needle too.

Perhaps if you crochet for a time, then again practice the continental knitting you may jog the English habits enough to unseat them. Half the battle of learning a new technique is to unlearn or at least set aside the old habits and patterns that you've programmed into your muscles. You will find it easy to recall either method (English or Continental) once you have them both mastered.

Once you've mastered both English and Continental, you'll be all set for two-handed Fair Isle (http://www.philosopherswool.com/Pages/Twohandedvideo.htm).

I was introduced to the idea of muscle memory when learning Tae Kwon-Do. The principle idea was that it required three correct repetitions to 'erase' each incorrect movement. Only when you had completed 1000 correct repetitions without error was it considered a beginning to mastering the movement.

Got any projects that require 3,000 knit stitches? How about 3,000 purls? It isn't that big; it is just 75 rows of 40 (garter) stitches or 150 rows of 40 st st. You'll get a nice scarf out of the practice. :)

--Jack :guyknitting:

GinnyG
12-02-2008, 11:18 AM
I didn't read all the posts here so I don't really know what has been said.

But my opinion is; if continental doesn't feel right DON'T DO IT!!!!!!!! There seems to be a silly "myth" that real knitters knit left handed. BALDERDASH. Some of the best knitters I know knit english.

I had a knitting teacher this fall who said that the "fastest knitter in the world" knits right handed. I don't know who that is and can't verify it but some of the students got into a discussion about knitting and the belief was you weren't a "real" knitter unless you knitted continental. As the only right handed knitter in the group I was greatly offended.

The class was a color stranding class and interestingly enough I had no trouble holding two colors; the main in my right and the second in my left. I was the only one to finish the project and in the end it was quite clear that my stitch tension was much better than the "real" knitters.

So I say, Do what feels good. The Zen of knitting is the process and if you aren't enjoying what you are doing WHAT IS THE POINT?

suzeeq
12-02-2008, 11:20 AM
Yes, I learned about muscle memory from yoga and tai chi, and it does take some repetition to get your muscles to memorize movements so you can do them without thinking.

It isn't so much about which style is `faster', but which is easier and more comfortable for the individual knitter to use. I crochet too, I think I learned about the same time as knitting, but I realize they're different ways of manipulating yarn and I hold it in my left to crochet, and my right to knit.

OffJumpsJack
12-02-2008, 11:56 AM
Yes, I learned about muscle memory from yoga and tai chi, and it does take some repetition to get your muscles to memorize movers so you can do them without thinking.

It isn't so much about which style is `faster', but which is easier and more comfortable for the individual knitter to use. I crochet too, I think I learned about the same time as knitting, but I realize they're different ways of manipulating yarn and I hold it in my left to crochet, and my right to knit.


Yes, comfort and ease are the key. I also like the "Zen of Knitting" comment by GinnyG.

I also think comfort comes with practice, so if you want to learn another way of holding the yarn while you knit or purl it will take consistent practice. Start slow. Get comfortable with it, and then improve upon it with smaller movements and the speed will come. If the comfort doesn't come, don't try to force it.

Having alternate methods can open possibilities, but I think comfort is essential to the enjoyment and relaxation (is that the Zen?) of woolcraft.

--Jack :guyknitting:

GinnyG
12-02-2008, 01:38 PM
Having alternate methods can open possibilities, but I think comfort is essential to the enjoyment and relaxation (is that the Zen?) of woolcraft.

--Jack :guyknitting:
YUP!:thumbsup:

There are two kinds of knitting; process knitting and product knitting. We are all a bit of both although one may outweigh the other.

Product knitting is knitting purely for the end result. I am doing alot of "product knitting" at the moment. The holidays are coming and I have items to finish for gifts. While I always enjoy knitting I do not enjoy product knitting as much as process knitting.

Process knitting is knitting for the sake of knitting. Knitting because you love the color and feel of the wool, the smoothness of the needles, the sound they make as you knit. Process knitting is the only true path to knitting ZEN, it is a meditative act that does not care how long it takes to complete an object but takes joy in each stitch.