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tarrentella
05-27-2008, 08:29 AM
I realy miss having a pet and have been thinking about getting either a cat or a rabbit. I have never kept a rabbit before so have been reading a lot of websites and asking people. My main concern is that i dont have a garden, just a concrete-paved back yard.
I have been told by a few people, and have read similarly, that many rabbits can be kept happily as housepets, being kept entirely indoors. This goes against my image of rabbits playing in the grass, so i was wondering if there are any rabbit owners on here who could perhaps give a little more insight into keeping an indoor rabbit.

I am also concerned that at some point in the next year i am going to have to move house. Do rabbits cope well with moving, or am i better off waiting until i am in a new place?

Thank you

knitgal
05-27-2008, 09:53 AM
My brother had a rabbit when we were young. It was very cute and it loved him, but it hated me. It used to chase me around and bite me. Once I was playing with a train on the floor and it bit me right on the bum!
He kept it in a cage in his room and let it out in the afternoon and evening. The major problem was that it peed and pooped in the corners on the carpet. We put newspaper down, but it didn't really work that well. In the summer it had a little leash and we took it outside, which it loved. We probably should have made it a little hutch in the garden. I don't know how it would have taken to moving though- sorry!
Personally, I like cats better for a lot of reasons, but I won't bore you with them because I'm sure you know them!

saracidaltendencies
05-27-2008, 10:17 AM
I used to have a rabbit and he was an indoor pet. He was very happy and sweet as could be. At the time I had only one cat and Ned (my rabbit) and Evil (my cat) got along great. I let Ned out of his cage to run around whenever I was home and he and Evil loved to play together. If you're concerned about him spending time outside, I'm sure you could find a rabbit leash and take him/her out for walks. When we first got Ned, I was living at home with my parents, and I took him with me when I moved out. He seemed to do just fine with the moving. However, every animal, just like every human, is different. If moving is a real possibility and you're concerned about the welfare of the rabbit, I'd wait, just to be on the safe side.

knitncook
05-27-2008, 10:24 AM
With any pet you have to consider whether your lifestyle would work well with that pet. Cats are fairly self-sufficient and usually less destructive than rabbits. Rabbits have been known to chew just about anything, but a lot of that is the nature of their teeth. They need to gnaw as their teeth continue to grow (much like a hamster's teeth). They need more attention and leaving for vacation generally involves finding someone to watch your pet for the duration as few kennels will take animals other than cats or dogs. Rabbits can be litter box trained just as cats can, but that doesn't mean that they always make it in their litter boxes.

Another thing is to consider where you are going to get your rabbit. I would highly suggest looking for one through a rescue organization rather than through breeders. These rabbits are generally a bit older and the rescue organization can usually tell you how well the rabbit is litter box trained or needs to be crated often. They can tell you a bit about the animal's disposition (whether it bites, is skiddish or randomly chews). They can also tell you often whether the rabbit gets along with other animals. Rabbits can live for 10 years or more. Are you willing to commit to an animal for that length of time? Even if it chews or messes in your house where you don't want it? There is a good website House Rabbit (http://www.rabbit.org/index.html) which can probably answer a lot of questions about rabbit ownership. It was the website that we used to decide that we were better off with just our cats (and our hamster).

figaro
05-27-2008, 10:46 AM
I had a indoor rabbit for a while and she was perfectly happy with being inside only. She had a large sized dog kennel with cat litter pan in there and she used it. You can check out http://www.rabbitsonline.net/ for some great information to start with. Scroll down to the bottom and there are some great resources to read. You do need to take into account the rabbit diet, while they do love carrots, they need it as a treat only cause there is so much sugar in them, they love dandelion leaves and the flowers, there are certain things they cannot have, and the type of pellet food. Rabbits are great as pets as long as you have good information, oh and don't forget a rabbit savvy vet-not all vets have treated rabbits and when you look for one be sure to ask about that first.

Xyza
05-27-2008, 11:11 AM
Lots of great information so far.

I also had an indoor only rabbit. He was perfectly happy to be inside. Sometimes I'd take him for walks on a leash.

I built my rabbit a cage because I think most cages are too small for rabbits. I wanted mine to be able to run around when I wasn't able to let him out. And it was cheaper than buying one from the pet store. He loved the larger cage. Seemed much happier after he made the move from the small cage to the large one.

It's good that you're getting all this information. A lot of people get rabbits because they think it's an easy pet to look after. But rabbits can require a lot of attention. They need to be able to get their exerice but they will chew on things. So until you know your rabbit well and understand it's habits, you'll need to keep an eye on it.

If you're not home alot or like to go away often, I'd think about getting a cat instead. Cats are a lot more independent.

saracidaltendencies
05-27-2008, 02:02 PM
Cats are fairly self-sufficient and usually less destructive than rabbits.


As much as I love my cats, I have to disagree on that point...lol...My cats are horribly destructive, they claw everything: the furniture, the banister on our stairs, the trim in the doorways...They have completely ruined the banister and countless pieces of furniture. I bought all sorts of different scratching posts for them and it makes no difference. Only one of our cats used it but none of the others. They also pee all over the place and it's driving me insane! We had to buy a shower curtain to put over our bed because one of the cats pees on the bed just about every night...We bought a new couch about a year ago and they peed on that too. They throw up all over the place and one of my cats thinks it's just awesome to sit on top of the cabinet and puke while up there to be sure to get not only the cabinet covered in puke, but, the stove, counter, and refrigerator as well! Of all the pets I have ever owned (and I've owned a lot) the cats have, by far, been the most destructive. Not to mention the countless number of items they have broken because of jumping on the counters. :grrr: Come to think of it, anyone wanna trade a rabbit for 6 cats??? :teehee:

Rabbitrescuer
05-27-2008, 02:25 PM
:grrr: Come to think of it, anyone wanna trade a rabbit for 6 cats??? :teehee:

I have some rabbits to spare but you can keep the cats :roflhard:

saracidaltendencies
05-27-2008, 02:56 PM
:roflhard: No, that's not the deal!! :roflhard:

Rabbitrescuer
05-27-2008, 02:58 PM
I realy miss having a pet and have been thinking about getting either a cat or a rabbit. I have never kept a rabbit before so have been reading a lot of websites and asking people. My main concern is that i dont have a garden, just a concrete-paved back yard.
I have been told by a few people, and have read similarly, that many rabbits can be kept happily as housepets, being kept entirely indoors. This goes against my image of rabbits playing in the grass, so i was wondering if there are any rabbit owners on here who could perhaps give a little more insight into keeping an indoor rabbit.

I am also concerned that at some point in the next year i am going to have to move house. Do rabbits cope well with moving, or am i better off waiting until i am in a new place?

Thank you



I have more indoor rabbits than I will admit to. I personally won't keep any pet as an outdoor pet - I just can't do it. Rabbits can be scared to death (literally) by animals coming at their cage in an agressive manner. Rabbits don't do stress well so if you will be moving soon I would wait until after you move to get one. As others have said look at shelters & on www.petfinder.com rather than buying from a breeder. Make sure your bun is spayed/ neutered. This is for their health & your piece of mind. I can tell you from experience girl buns that are intact are EVIL!! They will attack you. And intact boy buns like to spray just like cats do. I have one who before he was neutered would jump up, spin in a circle & spray pee as he was going around. Man was I glad when he got fixed.

vaknitter
05-27-2008, 09:15 PM
You've gotten lots of great advice so far but I will add my two cents just b/c I can :wink:
I've had 2 indoor house bunnies that I adored and would gladly get another if I didn't have 2 rambunxious dogs. I could never have an outdoor pet - even the dogs are inside in the recliner and one the bed. Too many outdoor rabbits whether in cages or not are eaten by wild animals or as someone else said - scared to death. Both buns had a 3ft x 3ft mesh cage that was about 14" off the ground with a litter tray UNDER the mesh so the bun bun was not sitting in the litter. I kept a towel and a soup box in the cage for them to nest in/sleep in etc. Both were litter box trained and had free run of the house. Both made moves well - first one actually moved from PA to Utah (spent 4 days in the car) with our family and travelled to NY with us for summer vacation every year. I took the 2nd bun outside on a harness style leash and he slipped it and ran circles around the house - thankfully I got him back and we never went out again.
Rabbits are by no stretch a low maintainance pet. They need fresh water every day, clean litter every couple of days, nail clipping, and lots of attention if you want them to be snuggly. House Rabbit society is great. Decide if you want a dwarf, lop, flemish giant... I believe they are considered exotic pets so you need to find a vet that is familiar with treating them. Their teeth sometimes need to be trimmed and eyes can be prone to infection.
I loved my rabbits - both were breeder rejects. One was a Netherlands dwarf and if I remember correctly the second was a Rex dwarf. First was a girl, second was a boy. Neither was fixed though I know now it is recommended. They are so funny to watch - they do flips in the air, run around, stomp their feet, beg for attention, and my second one love to eat cheerios and would jump on the kitchen table for breakfast straight out of my bowl ! He also loved raisins, walnuts, fresh veggies, oatmeal...
Anyway - this is my boy he lived almost 8 yrs when he took a bad jump broke his leg and went into shock. The girl lived almost 9 yrs and died of cancer.

jess_hawk
05-28-2008, 10:23 AM
My bro and I had rabbits when we were little and a lot of things got done way different than I would if I had them now. DEFINITELY spay/neuter. My rabbit ended up having babies, though they all died (talk about traumatizing a little girl). My girl and my brother's boy (we though it was a she when we bought it, my dad knew a guy who was a breeder) were both really sweet, Minnie would play fetch! My Amanda hated my dad though, he was the only person she ever bit (he deserved it, he picked her up by the scruff of her neck when she was little). My brother's second rabbit was EVIL. Its name was Imp and it was smart and mean. It would escape its cage and go running around the neighborhood (fortunately a black rabbit stands out). It bit. We would let it out sometimes and the procedure was to wrap it in a towel (so we could get a firm grip without hurting it or allowing it to bite or scratch us), carry it into the garage, shut all the doors, assemble the "rabbit proof fence" of chicken wire and wood, and then set it down in there. Sometimes it would calm down enough to play with us.

Oh, my girl was a mini-lop and my brother's were both mini-Rex. Rex are very very soft!
I always wanted a dutch, though. And if you get an angora you can spin the fiber....