PDA

View Full Version : Gardening, Landscaping, and other Home Improvement Projects


JessicaR
05-30-2008, 01:11 PM
I thought I'd start a new thread so we wouldn't have to keep "digging" up my other one ;) I was invited out to help a friend split her hostas, so I'll be coming home with some new ones!!! :happydance: I'm also going to get myself a chainsaw and maybe a hatchet. 9 more bushes to go, but 3 currently have nests in them.

CountryKitty
05-31-2008, 08:44 AM
Excellent! I picked up a couple small hostas a couple years ago and now have 6 or 7 because they are happy here--since they stay small they are well on their way to making a nice edging around the little flowerbed along the deck. Haven't flowered yet tho'

knitncook
05-31-2008, 11:36 AM
Oh I love hostas! I they grow fairly wild on both sides of my house. I just let them be. It's a nice border and helps hide me from my nosy mean neighbor :)

bjc1050
05-31-2008, 07:44 PM
I have mostly variegated hostas and they have grown huge in a few places even though I've divided them a few times. Will try to get a photo to post.

Also, have daylilies and peonies which are probably the easiest and most rewarding flowering plants to grow.

I just put in 3 tomato plants to help with my salad expense this summer. They are mostly paste type tomatoes and one regular slicing (Early Girl). Have seeds for cucumbers and squash which I hope to plant this coming week. Kind of got out of the habit of growing veggies after my stroke 4 years ago, but with every thing getting more expensive, I decided to try again.

Knit4Fun
05-31-2008, 08:27 PM
Hostas are lovely and I'm sure yours will look fantastic!

I wish I had more full sun areas in our yard - we have that in the front but our homeowner's association doesn't want gardens in the front yard and I suspect the deer would just consider it a salad bar anyway, and our back yard gets only part sun. I'm just doing container gardening again this year - tomatoes; cherry tomatoes; peppers; chives; dill; sweet basil; rosemary.

Some years I try different herbs to see if I like them - like last year I grew pineapple basil which smells more like pineapple and basil while the taste is mostly basil but it worked okay in salads.

This year I was stunned to find chocolate mint...it smelled heavenly...like a Girl Scout Thin Mint cookie! But it tasted just like regular mint so I was disappointed. I had visions of getting my chocolate fixes from something GREEN and good for me!!! :roflhard:

JessicaR
05-31-2008, 09:53 PM
I grew chocolate mint a few years ago just for decor and the smell :)

HollyP
06-01-2008, 10:00 PM
I saw your post about the hostas yesterday and thought to myself didn't I use to have hostas in the back yard next to the porch. Went out today with a rake and found a bunch of them barely poking through the ground. Our back yard is fairly wooded so I normally don't rake but it was worth it to get the hostas back! I'm hoping that now they are not covered in leaves they will be able to grow and catch up. Come to think of it I really need to make a map of my yard so I can remember were I have planted perennials. I was shocked last weekend when I was transplanting a bush to find a bulbish type thing starting to shoot right next to where I was moving the bush. My Mom swears it is a Peony I don't remember planting a peony there. I thought the memory was supposed to go much later:teehee:. I'm not even 30 yet!

I would love a large veggie/herb garden in the back but I don't have a large enough area with enough sun. Right now I have been having pretty good luck using containers in my sunny spots. My neighbor all make fun of me for having pots of tomatoes growing on my drive way. But they have never turned a bag of tomatoes when I eventually get over run with them.

JessicaR
06-01-2008, 11:36 PM
I'm starting to think that my "brainiac" ideas are a little too much :noway:

We have a tractor tire rim we use as a fire pit. It's 17 inches deep and about 4 feet in diameter. Well, I had this great idea that it would look so cute if I buried it and put cute retaining wall blocks around it :roll: Well, 22 5 gallon buckets of dirt later and my idea seems more like a pain, literally!!!

gingerbread
06-02-2008, 08:48 AM
Just caught your thread on gardening and was wondering if it is to late to plant tomatoes in containers? I love tomatoes but living in a retirement park they don't mind flower in the ground but not veggies. I have seen many a tomato plant in pots and I do have a large deck. One side has a roof and the smaller side doesn't and perfect for pots. So if someone with more of a green thumb than me could you let me know if it is to late. :waah: I sure hope not.


:waving:

HollyP
06-02-2008, 10:32 AM
Gingerbread I don't think you are. You might not get as many tomatoes as someone who planted earlier but that might not be a bad thing! I planted grape tomatoes in early June last year. They don't take as long to mature. By the time the rest of my tomatoes that had been planted a month or so earlier were starting to mature I was already enjoying my grape tomatoes. They were so good!

Jessica I hear you on the brilliant ideas not being so great once you start to implement them. I won't share my story of trying to remove an overgrown holly bush. My only tip is make sure you cut all the branches before you begin to dig.:lol:

JessicaR
06-02-2008, 12:17 PM
Gingerbread, you can still plant them, the growing season has just started here. I suggest thought that you put a rock or some type of weight at the bottom of the planter. Tomatoes can get really top heavy and I've had many fall over :doh:

JessicaR
06-02-2008, 11:02 PM
Please don't crucify me for saying this... but I'm starting to think I should of been born a man. Don't get me wrong, I like having boobs and all ;) But I had my first chainsaw experience today and it was awkward. Standing there with this big chainsaw, bulky goggles, muddy jeans and shirt. Not so sexy.

Plantgoddess+
06-03-2008, 07:29 PM
Please don't crucify me for saying this... but I'm starting to think I should of been born a man. Don't get me wrong, I like having boobs and all ;) But I had my first chainsaw experience today and it was awkward. Standing there with this big chainsaw, bulky goggles, muddy jeans and shirt. Not so sexy.
I have always been grateful to be deficient in that area. I have always been somewhat of a tomboy and still would rather be outdoors working than indoors. I do most of the work around here and you're right big breasts get in the way and get bruised easily.

mwhite
06-03-2008, 09:00 PM
I hear ya on the boob thing! LOL!

MY CALADIUMS ARE COMING UP!!! Yippee and Hooray!!! And elephant ears and OMG, all sorts of things I thought had died when we moved!!!
Doin tha happy dance here!!!

JessicaR
06-03-2008, 11:13 PM
I swear that these bushes are the spawn of the devil. Even with the chainsaw they are super hard to cut down :evil: I got one more down, cut below the soil level and buried. Cut the limbs off of two others but decided to end it at that for the day. The air is so heavy with moisture that it just drains you.

Knit4Fun
06-04-2008, 08:08 AM
Please don't crucify me for saying this... but I'm starting to think I should of been born a man. Don't get me wrong, I like having boobs and all ;) But I had my first chainsaw experience today and it was awkward. Standing there with this big chainsaw, bulky goggles, muddy jeans and shirt. Not so sexy.

Maybe if you wear a low-cut sexy flannel shirt with the goggles and chainsaw that would help?! :mrgreen:

Hey, I think a great definition of sexy is 'able to do work so I don't have to do it all'!!! :roflhard:

JessicaR
06-04-2008, 11:34 PM
Well, the rocks that I dug out of the overgrown "garden" in the back are around the fire pit. But not like I can use it, everything in the state is waterlogged. I was out doing all this while my neighbors across the street were just sitting on their front porch. I'm thinking the whole time, what a nice view, my sweaty fat *** working in the yard :roll:

JessicaR
06-08-2008, 02:06 PM
I'm starting to think I need to give all this up and build an ark instead :nails:

My in-laws will be here on Monday and offered to help us build a deck. I also think we'll put up a shed if it ever stops raining. Otherwise there are a million and one projects in the house we're doing as well. Think I may start blogging our adventures in home improvement :think:

Oh, I forget to add that we finally got all the bushes down as well. It so nice to have them gone, so much more room and view.

Knit4Fun
06-09-2008, 11:10 AM
Sounds like you are super busy! Great job on all that work! :yay:

We've got three bags of mulch yet to go and want to do some landscaping in our backyard...with this heat, though, it'll have to wait.

We went to my step-son's soccer game yesterday - it was 100 degrees and felt like 110 - ugh!

JessicaR
06-09-2008, 02:04 PM
I guess I'd take the rain over the heat any day. I don't do well in heat! But today, I'm shocked, the sun's out!!! :woot:

JessicaR
06-10-2008, 11:51 PM
I got sunburned today! :cool:

PurlyGyrl
06-13-2008, 11:34 AM
Jessica, you make me so tired:teehee: But I'm glad you are enjoying the gardening and projects. Maybe the rain will stop soon.

HollyP
06-13-2008, 06:57 PM
Well this thread has inspired me again! My neighbors got to enjoy my sweaty fat *** yesterday while I totally weeded my front mailbox garden. It had been completely overrun. I wish the plants I buy would grow half as well as weeds do in my gardens. I was super excited to see that some annuals I planted last year came back. I just couldn't see them through all the weeds! It has a few perennials but for the most part it is empty now. Tomorrow I am going to pick up some more flowers for it. I can't wait to see what the garden center has.
There is an English lady who lives down the street from me that has the most beautiful gardens. I wish I was outgoing enough to go knock on her door and talk gardening with her. I would love to see what she would suggest for my gardens.

bjc1050
06-13-2008, 07:09 PM
Herre are some photos of the huge hosta plants I mentioned before. They are both from divisions of the variegated hosta, but one didn't come true. I took 3 divisions (large clumps) a few weeks ago, but you can't tell.

jdee
06-13-2008, 11:21 PM
Wow! That hosta is beautiful. My poor hostas look pitiful this year.

JessicaR
06-15-2008, 01:11 PM
Jessica, you make me so tired:teehee: But I'm glad you are enjoying the gardening and projects. Maybe the rain will stop soon.

Hahaha, I know how you feel! My in-laws are visiting and they make me tired! They'll work outside all day and still do stuff inside before going to bed. I had to physically stop my mom in-law from emptying the dishwasher at 11 last night!!!

JessicaR
06-23-2008, 11:11 PM
Finally took a pic of the new deck! :woot:

bjc1050
06-24-2008, 03:45 PM
Looks great!

Knit4Fun
06-24-2008, 04:54 PM
Hey, the new deck looks wonderful!!! I can hear the wheels turning for landscaping... :teehee:

Plantgoddess+
06-24-2008, 08:22 PM
Lovely deck. When's the party?

knitgal
06-24-2008, 08:33 PM
Guys- I need gardening advice. We have a backyard with nothing in it. The grass is a little sad and full of moss and weeds and there are no plants. The main problem I have is that we have almost no sun exposure in our yard. It's a small yard and it's part of a condo, so it's open and partially shared. Any thoughts? I'd like to clean it up and have some plants, but I don't know where to start.

CountryKitty
06-24-2008, 10:27 PM
The moss suggests you have enough moisture retained in the soil that ferns would do well there. Columbine is a flowering plant that does OK in shady corners. There is Rose of Sharon growing wild in a very shady creekbed near my house as well--flowers every year too, so it's obviously a very shade tolerant plant. Violets, which have nice heart shaped leaves even when not blooming, grow in shady conditions too. And of course Hostas, which come in several sizes and can be blue or lime green or variegated green and white or green and yellow (some are small--diam. of a basketball, some are more like a yard/meter across).


The ROS gets 10' tall, the violets stay small, the rest are about knee high.

JessicaR
06-24-2008, 10:55 PM
Hostas! Love them ;)

knitgal
06-25-2008, 02:30 PM
Thanks guys! I knew about hostas, but I wasn't sure what else. I love flowers and I know I won't be able to have tons of them, but I'd like a few.

Also, what about tomatoes or other veggies? Do I need a lot of sun for them?

CountryKitty
06-25-2008, 06:37 PM
Most do need full sun, but peas and leaf lettuce can take some shade in summer. (Leaf lettuce comes in green, green with red speckles or red edges, or mostly red....not to mention smooth or ruffled edges).

Chives are an herb that does fine in shade too.

bjc1050
06-25-2008, 06:53 PM
I wanted to share a photo of the robin's eggs that were in a nest in the red honeysuckle bush beside our deck. I was afraid that I scared the momma bird too often and interrupted her setting on them, but they have just hatched yesterday. I've taken a photo of them, but haven't loaded them from the camera to the computer yet. Also, I'm working with a different camera and am not sure that I've figured out the zoom features yet. Anyway, here are the eggs - look close just below the red berries. The photo was taken about a week ago. The photo looks smaller than what's on my computer. Guess I'll have to relearn.

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/bjc1050/Garden/P6150005a.jpg

I'm also experimenting with attaching photos from resized photos from Photbucket in order to be sure that I'm using the right file size for KH.

bjc1050
06-25-2008, 07:04 PM
Also, had a wonderful crop of sour cherries this year. It is the 1st year that there were enough to make a few jars of jam. Usually the birds and insects have gotten most of them. I only planted 2 trees, but discovered that it's a lot of work to pit enough cherries for a pie.

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/bjc1050/Garden/P6110003.jpg

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/bjc1050/Garden/P6110007.jpg

bjc1050
06-25-2008, 07:11 PM
Knitgal, you might consider some wine cups such as these.

http://i114.photobucket.com/albums/n259/bjc1050/Garden/P6110006.jpg

They are growing in shade beneath the lower branches of one of my cherry trees. They don't spread too thickly or too quickly. I got these ones from the Jung seed catalog.

bjc1050
06-25-2008, 07:19 PM
Japanese anemones grow well in shade also. However, they are very invasive, but they need very little care except for thinning.

JessicaR
06-28-2008, 02:59 PM
Well my husband and I were supposed to work on the shed today but there's a wind advisory out. I'm not going to be on top of a shed trying to nail down shingles in 30-45 mph winds! So, yeah, little miffed about that.

And also we had a storm blow thru a few nights ago that knocked over my gazing globe and shattered it. I just bought a new one yesterday. *sigh* The projects are never ending! :eyes:

Plantgoddess+
06-28-2008, 11:05 PM
Instead of grass you could grow Irish moss. It will do well in shade and is a lovely shade of green. There are also lovely ferns that love shade. My favorite is the Japanese Painted fern. It's silvery fronds are gorgeous and light up dark corners. Hellebores, wild ginger, pulmonarias, lamiums, ligularias, monkshoods, and spiderworts are just a few things that come to mind for shade.

JessicaR
06-29-2008, 02:28 AM
I never had any luck with Irish moss... maybe I should of given it some beer?

bjc1050
06-29-2008, 12:58 PM
Many heuchera plants love shade, also.

Mike
06-29-2008, 03:28 PM
Here's a couple of my espaliered apple trees.
I like the look people give me when they talk about my "grapes" and I tell them they're apples.

Plantgoddess+
06-29-2008, 04:41 PM
I wish Irish Moss didn't like me. It sure gets around my yard. I have a thyme lawn and I have to keep digging the Irish moss out of it.
A couple of more great shade plants are bleeding heart and brunnera. Growing them together is one of my favorite plant combos.

VictoiseC
07-01-2008, 10:20 AM
What a wonderful thread/topic! I really enjoy the pix and stuff....
hey, chainsaw muddyboots female = sexy! :teehee:

AS for a homeowners association not allowing a garden WHAT? How rotten is that, I thought pet lovers were bad but flower lovers?

I have a broken finger this year so I won't be able to do my big garden as usual. I can't believe it. I will put some little veggies in though, esp tomato plants. And lots of salad. As for hostas, they are so magical, you can just keep splitting them and get more and more.... I'm lucky to have some that have tall purple flowers for a few months, I love those ones. My two big peony plants have gotten crowded out by a lilac bush so I have to figure out/do research if I can safely move them.... ok, all for now

bjc1050
07-01-2008, 12:03 PM
Peonies can be spit/divided just about like hosta, but wait until fall and don't plant the divisions too deeply. The tip of the plant should be a little above the soil. I love peonies. They are so beautiful for so little effort.

VictoiseC
07-02-2008, 11:27 AM
Thanks for that tip! I will definitely split my peonies up this fall. For one, I can hardly see them from the house because the lilac bush is hiding them.... I want to move them to a more prominent space.
Yours are pretty! Mine are pink.

bjc1050
07-02-2008, 04:15 PM
Thanks for that tip! I will definitely split my peonies up this fall. For one, I can hardly see them from the house because the lilac bush is hiding them.... I want to move them to a more prominent space.
Yours are pretty! Mine are pink.

I have white, pink, and red. The white ones are Felix Maxima and have a touch of red in the center. I just never seem to have time to take photos when all 3 colors are in bloom. The season is just too short for peonies. It's daylily time now. I have several types that bloom thru the season.

jeanius80
07-02-2008, 04:46 PM
Any tips on blueberries? I am so bummed! We bought two varieties. One was very well fruited. We planted them in the front of the house, south facing for lots of sun. The larger fruited plant is dying. The smaller one is doing much better. Any ideas? I think we are going to take it back to the nursery and get an exchange or refund. I was very excited to have fresh blueberries this year.

Plantgoddess+
07-02-2008, 05:49 PM
Blueberries are not sun plants. They require cool, moist, acid conditions. They grow wild as an understory plant in forests and prefer shade in the heat of the day. They like a ph of 5 to 5.5 and like a very humusy soil. If your soil is too neutral you can work sulfer into the soil about 2 weeks before planting and then scratch a little into the soil around the plants every couple of years. Lots of peat moss and compost worked into the soil helps hold moisture in while not making the soil soggy.
It sounds like your main problem is too much sun.

jeanius80
07-02-2008, 07:14 PM
thanks for the tips! It makes me mad, since the lady at the nursery told us they need 5 hours of direct sunlight and the plant tags both stated full sun. I did notice the soil was too wet. I'll have to drag some of our compost to the front this weekend and amend the soil a bit.

CountryKitty
07-03-2008, 11:35 AM
Blues also have very shallow root systems and don't compete well with grass--they like a nice thick mulch to keep the roots cool, the weeds down, and the soil from drying out.

Oh, and don't use that plastic landscaping fabric--it just keeps organic material from filtering down into the soil....womrs turn and aerate the soil in search of dead organic matter to eat and if there is none they leave and hte soils slowly compacts to the point that water runs off rather than soaks in.

JessicaR
07-03-2008, 11:41 AM
AHHHH!!! I don't know what I want to do! :hair:

I've been wanting to compost for a while, been saving veggie scraps and egg shells and putting them in buckets in the freezer til I can figure out what the heck I want to do!!! I can't make up my flipping mind. Composting it seems can be as easy or as labor intensive as you want to make it. Cold or hot pile? Should I build my own or buy a prefab one? Or what about vermicomposting? Geez o' petes I'm losing it.

CountryKitty
07-03-2008, 11:49 AM
LOL, I had a cold pile...rabbits and deer and possums would check it for goodies regularly. Plus my chickens would hit it looking for bugs.

Not interested in a hot pile (like Gran'pa always said about compost and drying dishes: "I let God take care of that for me.")

I have started taking a bit at a time out to the garden, laying it on the soil, covering with several sheets of used newspaper (no place around here to recycle), and covering with lawn clippings. Composting in place like this was called 'sheet composting' at one time. I don't do this right up against a plant tho--if a racoon or possum decided to dig up goodies they'd likely get the plant too.

Mike
07-03-2008, 12:42 PM
AHHHH!!! I don't know what I want to do! :hair:

I've been wanting to compost for a while, been saving veggie scraps and egg shells and putting them in buckets in the freezer til I can figure out what the heck I want to do!!! I can't make up my flipping mind. Composting it seems can be as easy or as labor intensive as you want to make it. Cold or hot pile? Should I build my own or buy a prefab one? Or what about vermicomposting? Geez o' petes I'm losing it.

I have a bucket under the sink for kitchen scraps.
I generally do a cold pile. I used to do hot piles but that's too much work. I save back enough leaves to throw on the cold pile to keep it from smelling whenever a bucket is added and use the rest to till into the garden while I wait for the black gold to happen at the bottom of the pile.

If you're in a real rush or don't want piles hanging around and don't want the extreme work of forking a pile back and forth I would buy one of those barrels that you spin. I think you can have it done in 2 weeks with that method if you really try.

If you want cold or to do the work of hot piles any method of fence to hold it in a pile will be good. I just have two circles of wire fence. Wood slats would hide it better and you could design it with a removable separator between the two piles so you don't have to throw up and over the middle.

Plantgoddess+
07-03-2008, 02:48 PM
thanks for the tips! It makes me mad, since the lady at the nursery told us they need 5 hours of direct sunlight and the plant tags both stated full sun. I did notice the soil was too wet. I'll have to drag some of our compost to the front this weekend and amend the soil a bit.
I didn't notice before that you live on the west side of the state. Are you familiar with huckleberries? They and blueberries are in the same family and blueberries like pretty much the same conditions except the altitude. East side of the house would be great or somewhere where they get some shade in the afternoon. Dappled sunshine is great. Huckleberries grow in a partly sunny area on the mountain sides and when I picked wild blueberries in Pa as a child they also grew in lightly forested areas. They do resent competition from other plants so a good mulch is a great idea. My blueberries finally died when quack grass choked them out.

JessicaR
07-03-2008, 02:57 PM
Yeah, I was thinking of just making it easy and reusing some plastic fencing and stakes that I had around my veggie garden last year. I wouldn't have a lot of lawn scraps, I like to burn them (Fire!! hehe) I use the ashes on a regular basis. And the fact that my husband rarely eats anything green maybe a small worm bin could work. Let the little wormies do the work?

Mike
07-03-2008, 05:46 PM
You'll change from wanting to burn everything.
You'll never get enough lawn clippings or leaves. It's kind of addicting if you have any use for the black dirt.

Plantgoddess+
07-04-2008, 01:33 PM
I find cold composting easier. I have 2 compost areas with 3 compartments each made with concrete blocks. I fill them as I get plant waste and when one is full I start on the next one. When all 3 are full I toss the outer layer from the 1st one onto the next and use the finished compost. I can't even come close to making enough compost for my yard. I use horse manure for the vegetable garden. I cover my garden every fall with manure and till it in in the spring. I also try and put an inch or so of compost on my flower beds each fall.

JessicaR
07-06-2008, 11:59 PM
I gots a hosta question... I transplanted 3 medium sized hostas about 2 weeks ago. One is doing great, one ok, and one isn't very happy :( The middle leaves are perky and it's sent up flowers but the outside leaves are all wilted. Should I trim those down or just leave them on to dry out? Thanks!

Plantgoddess+
07-08-2008, 10:57 PM
Go ahead and cut those wilted leaves off. They won't recover and may encourage insects or slugs. As long as some of the leaves look healthy and you keep it from drying out it should be just fine.
I have a hosta start that I got from a neighbor. It doesn't even have a leaf just the stem and not much for roots either, but it's hanging in and I think by the end of summer it should be sending up at least one leaf.

JessicaR
07-08-2008, 11:17 PM
Thank you very much!

Well, I'm almost done with my garden. Just need to get a few more plants in and then lay down the landscaping fabric and rocks in the pathways. I'm happy with the way it turned out. I'll take pics when it's finally done!

Puddinpop
07-16-2008, 01:35 PM
What about using impatients and begonias for a shady yard?

JessicaR
07-20-2008, 03:23 PM
Ok, it took flipping forever but the first garden is done for the most part. It's 14 x 14 feet.

Mike
07-20-2008, 05:57 PM
Square foot gardening?
Sometimes I wish I had the gumption to put mine into permanent beds. They look nice. (My sister has similar brick beds.)
But they sure make running my tiller difficult and hitting one of the bricks is rough on everything/everyone involved.

JessicaR
07-20-2008, 06:06 PM
It's not what I had originally had in mind. I was going to do this multi level curvy thingie, but I didn't like how the curves looked in the brick. If I really wanted curves I should of invested in retaining wall block. But I think it turned out well. I made the paths different sizes and off center to create interest, and the different levels as well. My next project is a rock garden :)

Plantgoddess+
07-20-2008, 09:43 PM
It looks lovely. It must feel great to have the project done. I envy people with flat ground. I get tired of going up and down steps and climbing hills to get from one level of my gardens to the next.

JessicaR
07-21-2008, 12:04 AM
Yes, I'm very glad it's done. Just a few minor details like trimming the landscape fabric, ect to do. I'm looking forward to the rock garden, and I'm even thinking that I won't even add plants til next year and just divide up all of my sedums :) So that way I don't have things dying on me!

Pic below is my awesomely cool weed patch :wink: Future spot of the rock garden...

Mike
07-21-2008, 02:52 AM
I would take a nice sloping yard.
The person who designed this neighborhood terraced it so there's a wasted 10' on the back and 6' on one side. The side is the low side which makes it impossible to mow if you (or your neighbor) puts a fence on that side.
It's dangerous to mow.

I took care of my low side by building a retaining wall ($$$$), I think I figured I carried 20 tons of rocks that year. The new neighbor above me tried to "give" me that part of his land, which he can't legally do because of required distances from buildings (or I'd take it).

Pic below is my awesomely cool weed patch :wink:

That's a beneficial insect safe haven.
At least that's my plan if anyone ever calls the city on me. :)

Puddinpop
07-25-2008, 04:12 PM
Jessica,
I just noticed that you are loosing weight by your ticker tape and I know it won't be long if you keep working like you have putting in that garden. Way to go on both counts.

JessicaR
07-26-2008, 07:45 PM
Awww thanks! cloud9 My last check up I hadn't lost or gained any. I think I had last some but then went on a 3 day ice cream binge! I'm making it a point to walk at least every other day. It's a nice way to de-stress and also found a route where only a handful of people can see my jiggly butt :teehee:

Debkcs
07-27-2008, 02:14 PM
Do projects inside the house count? :)

I had a ratty old bookcase in my front room, replaced it with two really nice lighted ones from Costco (I'm not proud) and then repainted the other one black, distressed it, and it's in my kitchen holding the things that won't go into the cupboards. The one that was in the kitchen is now in my husbands 'play room' holding more books.

Had been putting off painting the old bookcase, but with a kit, it didn't take any time at all, and best of all, there was no horrible odor from the paint and varnish. Everything, including me, washed up with soap and water.

JessicaR
07-27-2008, 07:35 PM
That's cool! Can you take a pic? I'd love to see the "distressed look.

I need to lay down new wood laminate in the living room this week. First I need to seal it with BIN primer because the dog pee also soaked into the sub floor.

jdee
07-28-2008, 11:45 PM
Your yard is very pretty. I use containers when I garden, because I never know how much to water otherwise. My poor plants look pitiful because the summers here are brutal, and I don't have the energy to tend to them. They looked so nice when I first planted them.

Also, congratulations on your weight loss. I have a weekness for icecream,too. My husband and I have started putting only a scoop in the bottom of a small bowl, and filling it the rest of the way with fresh fruit. That way, you can still have your ice cream, the fruit fills you up, and you don't get as many calories. Maybe someday, I'll lose some weight. :teehee: