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View Full Version : Looking for A wrap around dress pattern


jcurry28
06-16-2008, 12:09 PM
I'm looking for a wrap around dress pattern can someone help me?

Jan in CA
06-16-2008, 02:03 PM
For an adult or a child?

http://tinyhappy.typepad.com/tiny_happy/2008/06/blossom---a-knitted-dress-pattern.html

Hmm...can't find one for adults, but there probably is one somewhere.. :think:

scout52
06-16-2008, 02:39 PM
Free or to purchase?

the book "Knits so fine" by by Lisa R. Myers, Laura Grutzeck & Carol J. Sulcoski, has a gorgeous wrap dress pattern

here it is. Its on my queue

jcurry28
06-17-2008, 04:08 AM
i can't afford to purchase one so I am looking for a free pattern.

Mirl56
06-17-2008, 06:28 AM
How about find a wrap sweater you like, then add a skirt to it.

Or check out your library for books. I know my library sytem is getting "Knit so Fine" as I am already on the que to borrow it when they have it ready for checking out.

jcurry28
06-18-2008, 10:53 AM
I did check the library and they won't be getting it in. The libraries here have pattern books from the 70s. It's ridiculous. Maybe I should go to Borders book store and see if they have it and if they do just write out the pattern. that's just a really pretty dress.

jcurry28
06-18-2008, 06:54 PM
I went ahead and went to Borders and wrote out the pattern it took about 1 1/2 hours to write it but it was all worth it. Now if I can just figure out how to change the pattern to worsted weight yarn instead of fingering weight...any suggestions?

Jan in CA
06-18-2008, 07:11 PM
Whoa..that is such a huge difference in weights I don't think I'd even attempt it. I guess you could do a gauge swatch and see where to go from there. :shrug:

jcurry28
06-18-2008, 08:22 PM
What about DK weight? I just can't get fingering weight yarn without spending a TON of money.

Jan in CA
06-18-2008, 09:08 PM
It's closer than worsted. The very closest would be sport.

cam90066
06-19-2008, 01:27 AM
Technically speaking, there ARE ways to rework all the numbers (and graph BOs, decs, etc) if you want to use a diff weight yarn BUT will you achieve the drape and shaping that the orig affords? You might not like the heaviness of the FO and it'd be difficult to ascertain the entirety of a dress from a small swatch. Something to think about.

cam

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 11:33 AM
You're right I'll have to go to Joann's to see how much the yarn is. Hopefully it's not as expensive as I have seen in the past. Now what if I want to change the size of the dress dramatically like by 7 inches. How do I go about doing that? Do I just need to increase the cast on stitches or do I have to change everything in the pattern? Also how do I find out exactly how many more yards I'll need once I do the increases?

Jan in CA
06-19-2008, 11:51 AM
If you need to change it that much you will have to do more than change the cast on. It'll require different numbers for armholes, sleeves, shaping, etc. None of this is impossible, but it will require a fair amount of work. And math. :zombie:

cam90066
06-19-2008, 12:20 PM
Now what if I want to change the size of the dress dramatically like by 7 inches. How do I go about doing that? Do I just need to increase the cast on stitches or do I have to change everything in the pattern? Also how do I find out exactly how many more yards I'll need once I do the increases?

I agree with Jan. You're essentially creating a new garment. You'd only be using the orig patt as starting figs and having to rework virtually all those numbers to arrive at the new ones. (I've done it many times but it boils down to your math skills. The shaping can be done on graph paper using sheets of old and new gauge to map out the diffs.)

As for how much new yardage you'd need you may have to guestimate. If you had the yarn you plan to use and could make a swatch, then you could measure/weigh the swatch, determine the approx area of the new fabric and multiply accordingly. But without that info, kind of hard to tell. Buy extra of the yarn you're planning to use with the understanding you can return skeins you don't need (or use them on other projects).

cam

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 12:32 PM
So is there some kind of mathematical equation to figure out the whole pattern. I've never done this before and my math skills are way less than perfect. If I send you the pattern do you think you can help me?

cam90066
06-19-2008, 12:43 PM
Once you have your yarn and have established your new gauge you can use a freebie program like this (http://www.cara4webshopping.com/freebies_for_fun/knitcomp.htm) to determine your new CO and row numbers. (I've used KnitComp several times and it's very easy.) To rebuild the BOs/decs for shaping you'd need to print out graph paper of your old/new gauges. Knitting graph paper can be found for free at a number of sites online.

cam

cam90066
06-19-2008, 12:57 PM
Here is an example of reworking the BOs/decs to shape the armholes, neckline, etc. Not complicated and only takes a few mins once you get the hang of it. You can see by the graph sz differences as to the gauge change involved.

But, again, all of this can only be done once you've worked your swatch (wash/dried it, etc.)

cam

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 01:44 PM
that program didn't work. i'm so confused lol

Jan in CA
06-19-2008, 02:43 PM
Are you sure you need a wrap dress? :teehee:

BTW Cam... I can't find you on Rav even using the name you say to use.

:doh: DOH! I found you! :thumbsup:

cam90066
06-19-2008, 02:44 PM
that program didn't work. i'm so confused lol

Even tho I already have it on my sys I just DL'd it again, unzipped it and it worked just fine.

cam

cam90066
06-19-2008, 02:47 PM
BTW Cam... I can't find you on Rav even using the name you say to use.caminlaca? Hmmm. Wonder why I'm not coming up for you.

cam

Jan in CA
06-19-2008, 02:49 PM
caminlaca? Hmmm. Wonder why I'm not coming up for you.

cam

Because I read it as caminIaca... duh. :doh:

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 02:58 PM
No I don't need it I just really really want it but it will drive me crazy if I don't learn lol. But I did get a kick out of that comment lol.

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 02:59 PM
When I went to download it it said it can't be used with windows or something.

cam90066
06-19-2008, 03:09 PM
When I went to download it it said it can't be used with windows or something.

Hmm. I've recommended this to others and it's worked for them, no problem. There's a contact em addy at the bottom of the KnitComp page. You might send them the 'error' message you rec'd.

cam

tgwillis
06-19-2008, 03:21 PM
Once you have your yarn and have established your new gauge you can use a freebie program like this (http://www.cara4webshopping.com/freebies_for_fun/knitcomp.htm) to determine your new CO and row numbers. (I've used KnitComp several times and it's very easy.) To rebuild the BOs/decs for shaping you'd need to print out graph paper of your old/new gauges. Knitting graph paper can be found for free at a number of sites online.

cam

Can any pattern be enlarged with the program you linked to?

I have been wanting to make this dress for my daughter.
http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/2625

It only goes up to a chest of 22.5 " and a length of 19"

I would need a chest of 25" and a length of 32"

Is that possible?

cam90066
06-19-2008, 03:26 PM
Can any pattern be enlarged with the program you linked to?

I have been wanting to make this dress for my daughter.
http://www.purlsoho.com/purl/products/item/2625

It only goes up to a chest of 22.5 " and a length of 19"

I would need a chest of 25" and a length of 32"

Is that possible?

I'd not go so far as to say ANY pattern but that dress looks basic enough to where I'm fairly certain KC would work. There's little shaping involved so you're essentially looking for a new set of CO, rows, etc numbers for the sz you want. The chest change you want isn't that major and adding length is easy enough to do. Worth a try.

ETA...the changes you want to make seem relatively simple so you could probably make them w/o the KC prog. Just a matter of establishing your st count/in ratio and recalc'ing for the new sz. W/o seeing the actual patt details, hard to know what they specifically want done in the way of shaping but almost all patts can be reworked.

cam

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 03:29 PM
cam why can't you just change needle size since the difference is so small in that little girl's dress. to me going up a couple needle sizes would increase it wouldn't it? i'm still a fairly new knitter so some aspects are sooooooooooooo confusing.

cam90066
06-19-2008, 04:08 PM
cam why can't you just change needle size since the difference is so small in that little girl's dress. to me going up a couple needle sizes would increase it wouldn't it? i'm still a fairly new knitter so some aspects are sooooooooooooo confusing.

Changing ndl sz isn't the solution in all instances. Depends on the weight of the yarn, gauge, shaping, drape and the resulting fabric you want to achieve. Increasing the ndl sz might give you the width you want but you could end up with very loose, open sts and a fabric that looks nothing like you wanted. She'd still need to recalc any decs for the side shaping and perhaps any reworking of the armholes, etc. Changing the ndl sz is a quick and easy 'fix' for non-structured pieces like scarves, afghans, etc.

cam

tgwillis
06-19-2008, 06:14 PM
Changing ndl sz isn't the solution in all instances. Depends on the weight of the yarn, gauge, shaping, drape and the resulting fabric you want to achieve. Increasing the ndl sz might give you the width you want but you could end up with very loose, open sts and a fabric that looks nothing like you wanted. She'd still need to recalc any decs for the side shaping and perhaps any reworking of the armholes, etc. Changing the ndl sz is a quick and easy 'fix' for non-structured pieces like scarves, afghans, etc.

cam

I am going to try it, if I get stuck will you help? The pattern is knit flat I would like to knit it in the round.

tgwillis
06-19-2008, 06:16 PM
Here is an example of reworking the BOs/decs to shape the armholes, neckline, etc. Not complicated and only takes a few mins once you get the hang of it. You can see by the graph sz differences as to the gauge change involved.

But, again, all of this can only be done once you've worked your swatch (wash/dried it, etc.)

cam

Is each square a stitch?

cam90066
06-19-2008, 06:34 PM
I am going to try it, if I get stuck will you help? The pattern is knit flat I would like to knit it in the round.

I, or others here, are avail to help. Have you converted flat to ITR before? Did you calc the new numbers you need for the additional width you want?

cam

cam90066
06-19-2008, 06:36 PM
Is each square a stitch?

Yes. You map out the shape you intend to redo on the graph paper of the orig gauge and then remap it on the paper of the new gauge to ascertain your new working numbers (but retain the same shape). I just helped someone else do this on a cardi and she fig'd it out quite easily.

cam

jcurry28
06-19-2008, 09:24 PM
i must be so dumb because i just don't get this graphing business. i did figure out how many more stitches I would need for the wrap around dress to cast on but as far as the shaping and everything i'm totally lost. For the stitches all I did was see how many inches each size was and the difference in stitches between each size and added them on for the next size up. That's the way the knitting class taught me when i started doing this about 6 months ago but as far as everything else i'm totally lost.

cam90066
06-20-2008, 01:24 AM
If your gauge is exact to the pattern and all you're wanting to do is create more width, you can increase your CO and you'll get more inches around. BUT, you've indicated you want to use a different gauged yarn. Just widening the garment doesn't take into consideration the issues of a yarn of different weight.

For instance, if you work your armhole BOs/decs with the same figs as the orig gauge, but with a diff (larger/smaller gauge) the armhole will end up larger or smaller. (Also applies to sleeve decs, neckline shaping, etc.)

In order to create a comparably-sized opening, you have to account for the differences in row height and stitch width. The way to achieve that is to map out the shape of the original...using the orig pattern figures...and then establish what new figures you need to arrive at the same shape. For ex, if the orig armhole reqs BO of 3, and then four decs done every other row, at a larger gauge you might do 2 BOs, and then three decs. (The armhole would look the same but you've created the shape with fewer BOs/decs.)

A very basic analogy. If a tall person and a short person stand side by side, and are each told to take 10 steps forward, the tall person will go farther based on having a longer stride. For the shorter person to arrive at the same ending point, it'd have to be determined how many extra steps they need to take to reach the spot where the tall person finished. Thus, with knitting, one gauge might require 50 rows to reach a point, but another gauge would need 35.

When you knit you're creating fabric. Your shaping has to match the shape determined by the person who designed the pattern. When you deviate from the intended gauge, you have to make adjustments for the differences (rows, stitches) over the shaped areas. As with the ppl mentioned above, you have to establish a way to arrive at the same shape but with different numbers. (As already noted, this is applicable to fitted garments. If this were a scarf or afghan, where no specific sizing is critical, these steps wouldn't be necessary.) The quickest and easiest way I've found when designing is to map out the shape and plug in the numbers needed to recreate the shape. (As shown in the pic I posted.)

You could certainly choose to work the shaping as per the original pattern, while at the same time using a diff weight of yarn...and thus achieving a diff gauge...but the likelihood it'll fit as desired is rather slim (unless the gauge variances are extremely small).

HTH,
cam

jcurry28
06-20-2008, 02:48 AM
Okay that makes perfect sense now. Thank you so much for dumbing it down for me. If I use the same gauge yarn then like the pattern calls for and I want to widen the piece all I have to do is cast on additional stitches and that's it.

cam90066
06-20-2008, 11:22 AM
If I use the same gauge yarn then like the pattern calls for and I want to widen the piece all I have to do is cast on additional stitches and that's it.

Yes and no. Adding more sts to your CO and working the same shaping numbers of the orig patt means you'll end up with a proportionately wider piece (wider at lower hem, waist, bust, neckline, shoulders, etc). If you feel you're in need of more width in all areas you might be okay. However, if you're wanting more width in the torso but NOT the neck and shoulders, you run the risk of a gaping neckline (or one that opens too low onto the bust) and/or shoulders that are too wide and drop down onto the arm. Granted, a wrap style would afford the ability to adjust fit in the torso but wouldn't help much in the neck/shoulder area. You might still need to adjust the shaping in those latter areas if you don't want more width there.

Hope that answers your question.

cam

jcurry28
06-20-2008, 02:38 PM
It sure does. Thank you so much for all of your help. I really appreciate it. You have been such a huge help.