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View Full Version : How is the name of your town pronounced?


Lindsey H
11-04-2008, 07:26 PM
I always think it is funny to hear how radio and tv people pronounce the names of local cities. For instance, they pronounce Norfolk as it looks, Nor-folk which just sounds silly. When locals pronounce it it sounds like Naw-(then bad word that starts with "F"). We do the same with Suffolk. The other city name that people slaughter is Portsmouth which they pronounce Ports-mouth which sounds really silly. True Portsmouth natives like my mom say Porch-muth.
What about your cities and towns?

cdjack
11-04-2008, 07:50 PM
There's only one way to say the name of my town: CrossRoads.
The funniest mispronunciation of a town name that I ever heard was when Greta Van Sustern referred to Mesquite, Texas as "muh- squee-tay".

lactosefree
11-04-2008, 07:54 PM
It's pretty hard to mess up San Francisco, but I hate it when people refer it to 'Frisco.

My parents live in Upland in California. It looks like it would be pronounced Up-land, but it's actually pronounced up-lynn(d) - with a very soft d - by the locals.

JustAFloridaGirl
11-04-2008, 08:21 PM
I didn't actually *live* there but I lived close enough for it to annoy me when people pronounce Kissimmee as KISS-i-mee. It's supposed to be ki-SI-mee.

ArtLady1981
11-04-2008, 09:54 PM
My town is Kent...as in Clark Kent, superman's alter ego!

Cute thread, Lindsey! I like being informed about correct pronunciation!

How is New Orleans really pronounced? Anyone know?

I've heard New Or-leeens. I've heard N'awlins. I heard New Ahlens. :shrug:

Jan in CA
11-04-2008, 10:03 PM
Well, Laguna Hills is pretty much not hard to pronounce although I have on rare occasions heard Laguana. :zombie: Southern CA has a lot of spanish names and boy do those get slaughters. San Juan Capistrano and La Jolla come to mind.. Often we hear San Jew-an Cap -iss- tree-an-oh and La Jolla is pronounced La Hoya, but it gets pronounced phonetically a lot. :teehee: Understandable, but funny to us nonetheless.

HollyP
11-04-2008, 11:05 PM
Lindsey, I grew up and still live in Yorktown( pronounced exactly as it looks). When I was little my Aunt washed my mouth out with soap for saying Norfolk in the local manner!:teehee: I told my Mom about it later and she set my Aunt straight.

Wanda Witch
11-04-2008, 11:11 PM
Try living in New Mexico with all the Spanish and Indian names. I grew up in So Cal and then lived in San Francisco and I have always appreciated when anyone tried to pronounce the names correctly. Well, now living in Texas I hear the name of 'Alvarado' prounced like 'Al - va ray do.' Now, come on, do they pronounce the truck Silverado the same? No. And, there again, here in TAXUS they pronounce Rio Grande, a very Spanish name, Rio Grand. Come on, folks. Show respect for the origin of the name!

ladyjessica
11-04-2008, 11:11 PM
It's kind of hard to mess up Frostburg. It's a very fitting name as this town gets extremely cold and windy in the winter, and people are always asking me if the town got its name because of the weather. :teehee:

Krystal
11-05-2008, 12:21 AM
Well, Windsor is pretty easy to sound out. Nothing special there. However we do have a lot of street names that are based of some of the Native language (I think the tribe in the area way back when was Ojibway, but not sure) and french and stuff. Or they just pronounce them weird.

Pierre street is pronounces as Peer-EE, NOT Pee-Air
Baby street is pronounced as Bab-ee NOT Bay-Bee

The hardest streets for new people to pronounce would be:
Ouellette = Oh-Let tho some french speakers like to say OO-let. This is incorrect in Windsor. lol

Techumseh Rd. = Teh-kum-see
and lastly, Wyandotte = Whine-Dot to us Windsorites.

Hildegard_von_Knittin
11-05-2008, 12:22 AM
I grew up in Baltimore, and locals call it Balmer, Murlin (or, more likely Balmermurlin). That's in Balmer Canny (County), hon.

brendajos
11-05-2008, 12:54 AM
Well I live in Omaha... I haven't heard too many people say that wrong (though my brother does put a weird emphasis on the middle syllable) I grew up in Holstein which is pronounced hole-steen.... yes like the cow but it is actually named after a town in Germany.

The thing that makes me crazy is a town here in Nebraska named Norfolk. you think y'all pronounce it oddly... they pronounce it "nor-fork" here. There is a reason for it but it still makes me crazy.

When settlers came here they actually wanted to name it after the valley they settled in, the North Fork valley. They made a compound word out of it, "norfork" and a postal employee thought it was spelled wrong and changed it to "Norfolk." so while it is spelled one way they still ignore it and pronounce it the other way.

flea
11-05-2008, 01:25 AM
I grew up in a smallish town in Texas named Cleburne. It's pretty easy, or so I thought: "Clee-burn." However, I've heard it as "Clay-burn" a lot from those living up in this region (Northern KY/Southern OH).
The fun one around Cleburne isn't Alvarado. Although Alvarado is closer geographically! It was Mexia. Correctly pronounced "Meh-hey-ah" with the x being a soft h. So often you'd hear it as "Mex-i-a." Still makes me laugh.

cristina61
11-05-2008, 02:33 AM
Nothing hard to pronounce about the towns in N. California where I was born and grew up, but I have a fondness for Washington State, and I can think of at least one town with a name that tripped me up for a long time.

It's Puyallup -- and I always wanted to pronounce it Poo-yal-lup. It took a long time before I finally learned that it's actually Pew-al-up.

jess_hawk
11-05-2008, 03:36 AM
Not necessarily towns that I am from/have lived in but:
Ely, MN: I had always heard in pronounced ee-Lie (like the name) but when I went there I heard it ee-lee.
Towns in Australia:
Cairns: Any Iowan will tell you that proper pronunciation of this is "cayrrrns." My Aussie friends laughed at me. My roommate, from the Cairns area, pronounced it "Cay(r)ns" with the (r) a VERY light/flipped r... the vowel was 3/4 of the way to a long a from a short one, too, rather than a full long a. I totally can't pronounce it this way. My other friends said "Cans." That one I can say.
Brisbane: Iowans say "Briz-bane" - Aussies say "Briz-ben" or "Briz-bin" or "Brizzy" (And by the way "Aussie" is pronounced "Ozzie"... Aaron thought it was hilarious when I said it "awe-see")
Melbourne: Iowans - "Mel-born"; Aussies: "Mel-bin"
Mooloolaba: Iowans don't try this one until they've been taught the correct word. if they do try it, they say "Moo...loo...lah...bah." Aussies: "Muh-loo-luhbuh"
One of my favorites: Gympie. Can be pronounced "gimpy" (as in having a limp) or "gym-pie" (like, where basketball games are held + tasty desert). My friends from there were more likely to say "gimpy"
Bli Bli - Iowans: blee blee, blih blih... Aussies: Bl-eye Bl-eye

These were the most commonly mis-pronounced. Beerwah, Bundaberg, Kawana, Noosa, and Landsborough are all pronounced basically as they are spelled. Caboulture and Caloundra are pronounced "Cab-ulture" (Rhymes with "vulture") and Ca-lund-ra (same u as before), but Nambour is "nam-bore."

Oh, and I almost forgot Buderim! I'd never heard it spelled the first time I heard it pronounced (by a bus driver giving the foreign students a "Welcome to the Coast" tour), but I later heard some Americans say it "bud-er-'im." To the locals it's usually "Budrum" or "Budrim," with a hard d that is almost a t and the last vowel being some sort of mushed vowel in the middle of uh/eh/ih.
Sorry for being way too in depth, but I was trying to learn to say things right so I had to think my way through all of this a few times.

Luvmyrottnboy
11-05-2008, 08:39 AM
Well, Boston is hard to mess up but I do get a kick out of hearing Worcester, Gloucester, Quincy, Haverhill etc. get messed up.

One time, when I used to work at Logan Airport, a traveler asked me how to get to "Revery". Huh??????????? Finally I asked him to spell it and he meant "Revere"!

Ah yes, the midnight ride of Paul Revery:teehee:

Crycket
11-05-2008, 09:38 AM
I was living in Etobicoke...which can cause some ppl grief....

It is pronounced Eh-tobi-coe

cindycactus
11-05-2008, 09:49 AM
It's kind of hard to mess up Frostburg. It's a very fitting name as this town gets extremely cold and windy in the winter, and people are always asking me if the town got its name because of the weather. :teehee:
ladyjessica, We have a town in Florida named Frostproof. It was named so because there is rarely a frost in Central Florida. Maybe it should be Rarely Frosty. :roflhard: :roflhard:

Luvmyrottnboy
11-05-2008, 09:54 AM
Are there any South African members here?

In 1999 I stayed in a fabulous B&B just putside of Durban. No A/C (!) but it was right on the shore and the owners had great dogs that came and went in our rooms whenever they wanted.

I loved it and the town was pronounced: Ooomshloti.

I can't, for the life of me, remember the proper spelling!

cftwo
11-05-2008, 09:55 AM
I loved on Wooster - which is pronounced just like Worcester is, with the oo as in "book". A lot of people try to have it rhyme with rooster.

I lived in a town where two different pronunciations were used about equally - Lay-trobe, and Lah-trobe.

My current hometown is Selinsgrove - prounounced SEE-lynns-grove.

Abbily
11-05-2008, 10:59 AM
The fun one around Cleburne isn't Alvarado. Although Alvarado is closer geographically! It was Mexia. Correctly pronounced "Meh-hey-ah" with the x being a soft h. So often you'd hear it as "Mex-i-a." Still makes me laugh.

I live in Texas, and "Mex-i-a" cracks me up, too- as does Bexar County (San Antonio) which should be pronounced like "bare", but is frequently pronounced phonetically.

PurlyGyrl
11-05-2008, 11:10 AM
Well my little hometown is Coalfield. Not a hard one. But being a southerner we like to drop any unnecessary letters so its usually pronounced by the locals as "Cofeel".:doh:

1knittychick
11-05-2008, 11:22 AM
Well, let me see. I really don't live within any city or town limits. I am as rural as you can get. So depending on my mood I live in the vicinity of 3 places--Putnam, Sweet Water and Nanafalia. The first 2 are easy and we pronounce the 3rd one Nana-fly.

kellyh57
11-05-2008, 12:24 PM
Kansas City is pretty easy to figure out- but, yes, it IS in Missouri (and that ends in an i not an a!) My favorite is from Iowa. The town is What Cheer. Happy town, right? No, it's WAH-cheer - Wah-like water, silent T, emphasis on the Wah part. Then there's Kearney, just north of me in Missouree. It's pronounced Kar-nee- kinda like the Spanish word for meat. I think the one in Nebraska is the same way.

Kelly

Simply_Renee
11-05-2008, 12:42 PM
Hee hee I graduated high school in Newport News.

My nearest town is usually mispronounced. It's Elizabethton. Which most people pronounce Elizabeth-ton.

But when you live here- it's ElizaBETHton. I'm actually way out in the county.

evona
11-05-2008, 04:58 PM
Well, Laguna Hills is pretty much not hard to pronounce although I have on rare occasions heard Laguana. :zombie: Southern CA has a lot of spanish names and boy do those get slaughters. San Juan Capistrano and La Jolla come to mind.. Often we hear San Jew-an Cap -iss- tree-an-oh and La Jolla is pronounced La Hoya, but it gets pronounced phonetically a lot. :teehee: Understandable, but funny to us nonetheless.

Port Hueneme comes to mind with mispronunciations. Its a town in Ventura County and its pronounced Port Why-knee-me.

evona
11-05-2008, 05:13 PM
Nothing hard to pronounce about the towns in N. California where I was born and grew up, but I have a fondness for Washington State, and I can think of at least one town with a name that tripped me up for a long time.

It's Puyallup -- and I always wanted to pronounce it Poo-yal-lup. It took a long time before I finally learned that it's actually Pew-al-up.

Well - you do have Del Norte County up there in Norcal though - which to a Southern Californian like me is pronounced like the Spanish would pronounce it - Del Nortay (with a roll of the r even), but to locals there its just Del Nort :) And there is Tuolumne, which I guess is more central California, but its pronounce two-wall-oh-me (closest I can get - its kinda said like that but fast and it runs together) And there is Yreka - which is Why-reeka, but I always here people trying to pronounce it like Eureka (You-reeka)

Lindsey H
11-05-2008, 05:52 PM
All of these are great.
HollyP - Great story.

cristina61
11-06-2008, 01:33 AM
Well - you do have Del Norte County up there in Norcal though - which to a Southern Californian like me is pronounced like the Spanish would pronounce it - Del Nortay (with a roll of the r even), but to locals there its just Del Nort :) And there is Tuolumne, which I guess is more central California, but its pronounce two-wall-oh-me (closest I can get - its kinda said like that but fast and it runs together) And there is Yreka - which is Why-reeka, but I always here people trying to pronounce it like Eureka (You-reeka)

You're right -- I guess I wasn't thinking far enough afield. And since I live closer to Tuolumne than to Del Norte County, technically I guess I'm not a real northern Northern California gal.

We do have a river to the south of us called the Cosumnes (Co-soom-nes) and it drives me nuts when the local news people pronounce it Cun-sum-nis . . . hello, there's no N in there!

On the central coast, there's a town called San Luis Obispo. Some people want to pronounce it San Looey Obispo (as you would in Spanish), but apparently the locals get unhappy when they hear that; they pronounce it like Lewis.

I'll have to see if I can come up with any others. :think:

saracidaltendencies
11-06-2008, 02:14 AM
Everything around me is pretty much pronounced as it appears. I mean you can't really screw up St. Louis or St. Charles, or St. Peters, or O'Fallon...lol...One thing that does drive me nuts though is when people say MissourA instead of Missouri (Missouree)....no offense to anyone here who may pronounce it Missoura :teehee:

Oh, but we do have a local grocery store called Schnucks (Shnooks) and some people say Snooks...Drives me crazy! lol

cftwo
11-06-2008, 11:21 AM
A question about the Missouri/Missoura pronunciation - from people I've known from that state, the pronunciation tends to differ by region. I lived in southern Iowa for a while, and the Missourians I knew there called it Missoura. Those from St. Louis area called it Missouri. Is this just a coincidence, or is it really a regional thing?

Simply_Renee
11-06-2008, 12:30 PM
My dad lives right near San Luis Obispo- we all call it Slo. :-)

cacunn
11-06-2008, 01:02 PM
I was born in central Maryland about an hour north west of Washington DC. The Potomac River separates Maryland from Va. The locals call it the Pa-toe-mic river. As I was flying into DC one time the pilot said that we were flying over the Pot-o-mac river on the way to the airport. I was afraid I was on the wrong plane.

kellyh57
11-06-2008, 02:00 PM
I think the hicks call it Missourah and the normal people call it Missouree. That's just my opinion though! I have friends that say Missourah so no offense, just the way I was raised. Someone once said it's not Mississipah, so why call it Missourah? Of course, if you go to MU, they are called Mizzou and chant Mizzou-RAH, but that's different...

Another one I thought of- Olathe. It's pronounced O-lay-tha. Whenever I hear someone from somewhere else pronounce it, they either leave off the last syllable or use a long e.

Kelly

ladyjessica
11-06-2008, 04:21 PM
ladyjessica, We have a town in Florida named Frostproof. It was named so because there is rarely a frost in Central Florida. Maybe it should be Rarely Frosty. :roflhard: :roflhard:

:rofl: :rofl:

That's funny. It does get quite frosty here. We had our first snow last week - about 3 inches - and today it's almost 70. Go figure.

Knitting_Guy
11-06-2008, 07:34 PM
I didn't actually *live* there but I lived close enough for it to annoy me when people pronounce Kissimmee as KISS-i-mee. It's supposed to be ki-SI-mee.
Easy way to spot the tourists :roflhard:

sgtpam
11-06-2008, 11:56 PM
My parents live in Upland in California. It looks like it would be pronounced Up-land, but it's actually pronounced up-lynn(d) - with a very soft d - by the locals.

No way......how long have they been there? I was raised in Upland. I left in 1981 after joining the military. We always pronounced it Uplund...the new locals must be getting lazyon the d :teehee:

saracidaltendencies
11-07-2008, 12:43 AM
A question about the Missouri/Missoura pronunciation - from people I've known from that state, the pronunciation tends to differ by region. I lived in southern Iowa for a while, and the Missourians I knew there called it Missoura. Those from St. Louis area called it Missouri. Is this just a coincidence, or is it really a regional thing?


Yes, it does differ throughout the state...It's common in the more rural parts of Missouri for people to pronounce it Missoura and in the more urban areas it's pronounced Missouri. Another interesting thing: my grandma's name is Naomi, and, I believe, most people pronounce it Naomee, but, to show how the pronunciations differ throughout the state, my great grandma (my grandma's mom) always pronounced it Naoma.

Knitting_Guy
11-07-2008, 10:50 AM
Yes, it does differ throughout the state...It's common in the more rural parts of Missouri for people to pronounce it Missoura and in the more urban areas it's pronounced Missouri.

Interesting (to me anyway) fact about that state. The original name was in fact Missoura but when it became a state the upper class folks thought the "hicks" were just mispronouncing it and it officially became named Missouri in the statehood papers. So it's current name came about because the "educated" folks were the ones who were mispronouncing it.

saracidaltendencies
11-07-2008, 12:25 PM
Interesting indeed! Ya learn something new every day...lol

lactosefree
11-07-2008, 04:51 PM
No way......how long have they been there? I was raised in Upland. I left in 1981 after joining the military. We always pronounced it Uplund...the new locals must be getting lazyon the d :teehee:

My parents have been living in Upland since 1990... i can't believe how long it's been!

Mike
11-07-2008, 05:57 PM
My state is pretty creative on some pronunciations. San Jose is not pronounced like the CA city, it's pronounced like it's spelled with a J not an H.
Athens is with a long A.
My town is Worshington, but it's spelled like the first President. Only some uppity people from the city pronounce it right. I'm a product of many different places so I do both.
We also have a lot of French and Indian names which are often butchered.
Some -towns are pronounced "ton", some -tons are pronounced "town".

The reporters butcher not only the real pronunciation but the state's versions and make up their own.

stitchwitch
11-07-2008, 06:27 PM
Try having sports teams that aren't labled for any real city. We have the Tampa Bay Bucs and the Tampa Bay Rays. There is no city called Tampa Bay. The Tampa Bay bucs are in Tampa, the Tampa Bay Rays are in St. Petersburg. It drives us all nuts when we have a super bowl or other type of event and hear sportscasters say "it's a beautiful day in Tampa Bay, Florida.". Nobody lives in Tampa Bay, it's a body of water!:roflhard:
There is town near where I used to live called Dunedin, everybody that wasn't familiar with it would call it Doonie-din, it's pronounced Done-eden.
Florida is full of mispronounced towns due to the amount of indian names we have for our towns.

Cynamar
11-08-2008, 11:22 PM
Saint Loo-iss. We have a street here named Gravois (Gra-voy) and it's lots of fun to hereout-of-towners pronounce it. I called the Walgreens 800-number once to see about flu shots and the recording gave me an address on "Graveeos". My brother and I think we're so clever to call it Gravwa like we're French. Then one day I had to pull the car over and call him when I heard that pronunciation on a Wal-Mart commercial on the radio! Apparently the Gravwa Bluffs Wal-Mart is now a Supercenter. Cool.

Mike
11-09-2008, 02:24 AM
Saint Loo-iss. We have a street here named Gravois (Gra-voy) and it's lots of fun to hereout-of-towners pronounce it. I called the Walgreens 800-number once to see about flu shots and the recording gave me an address on "Graveeos". My brother and I think we're so clever to call it Gravwa like we're French. Then one day I had to pull the car over and call him when I heard that pronunciation on a Wal-Mart commercial on the radio! Apparently the Gravwa Bluffs Wal-Mart is now a Supercenter. Cool.

I like to call it Illin-wah.
There's no noise in Illinwah.

jess_hawk
11-09-2008, 03:19 AM
I met a girl who was from New York once, who had come to visit friends on the western edge of Ill-i-noise. She left Chicago traveling west but missed her exit and crossed the river into Ohio.
Mm. smart girl. Knows her geography and stuff. She was nice though.

On a family vacation once, we mentioned being from Iowa to another family. They were very excited and told us all about their trip to Dez Moin-ez. I don't know how common the mispronunciation is, but in case anyone on here doesn't know, its properly Dee Moin. Its French, and they stick in all kinds of extra s's.

Debkcs
11-09-2008, 04:11 AM
I was waiting for someone to bring up Missouri. We're very good friends with a lot of people from there, as well as my maternal grandmother having been born there. Half the folks end it with an 'i', half with an 'a'. Never could get a straight answer, they'll argue until midnight about it.

However, after being in the Army and having a ton of Army friends, we just referred to the base there as "Fort Lost-in-the-woods, Misery". Old joke, but every soldier there knows it.

First time we saw a sign for Puyallup, WA, when stationed in Tacoma, we nearly doubled over laughing trying to figure it out. "Pu-a-loop" was as close as we could come until someone set us straight.

I'm just glad I don't live in Maggie's Nipples, WY. :roflhard: It's true, ask Mason!

Mike
11-09-2008, 12:41 PM
I met a girl who was from New York once, who had come to visit friends on the western edge of Ill-i-noise. She left Chicago traveling west but missed her exit and crossed the river into Ohio.
Mm. smart girl. Knows her geography and stuff. She was nice though.

Now that was a wrong turn.
I think my niece was trying to get back from IN or WI and somehow ended up in MI but that's not that long of a hop and since it was at night they didn't have the sun telling them something was wrong as they circled the lake.

But to cross all of Indiana before she figured out something was wrong is an amazing feat.

When I lived there I used Dez Moin-ez just to make fun of it. I've only heard it seriously mispronounced with an s at the end, that is common with the people there.
Since I actually lived in West Des Moines I should've called it We De Moin.

jess_hawk
11-09-2008, 12:59 PM
Lol no she thought Iowa was Ohio. I probably should have specified, she crossed the Mississippi into "Ohio." From Rock Island.
Yeah, we mispronounce Des Moines intentionally as a joke... hadn't thought of dropping the ending from West Des Moines. Wouldn't you just drop the S to make Wet De Moin?

Jan in CA
11-09-2008, 02:01 PM
Port Hueneme comes to mind with mispronunciations. Its a town in Ventura County and its pronounced Port Why-knee-me.

Oh yeah, that's another tongue twister! :teehee:

MoniDew
11-09-2008, 02:42 PM
Here in Oklahoma, we have a town called Miami, which, I suppose from the Missourian's influence, the locals pronounce My Am Ah.
________
Automotive fuel cell cooperation (http://www.ford-wiki.com/wiki/Automotive_Fuel_Cell_Cooperation)

evona
11-09-2008, 03:05 PM
I'm just glad I don't live in Maggie's Nipples, WY. :roflhard: It's true, ask Mason!

I believe it - I mean they do have the Teton Mountain Range in WY and the largest of those mountains is the Grand Teton!!! Grand Teton means large teat in French. Must have some relation :roflhard:

tarrentella
11-09-2008, 03:53 PM
My dad lives in a town called Birkenhead The only thing that might not be obvious from the spelling is that Birken is pronounced Berken and the 'head' is often a little rushed so there is no emphasis on the 'h'. We once watched a whole news report about somthing going on in a place called Beercan Head before one of the pictures showed a local landmark and that the reporter had gotten the stresses and pronunciation wrong and she was talking about our home town.

Saying that Liverpool is pronounced with a short 'i' sound not a long i sound (as in 'lie'). That one often makes me cringe.

My brother lives in a place called Ellesmere Port which i have heard pronounced elles-mare rather than elsmeer (the middle 'e' really seems to throw people).

My ex lived in a small town called Alnwick. The next town along and the one with the mainline rail station was Alnmouth. Alnwick is actually pronounced without the 'l' or 'w' as Annick or even Anuck where as Alnmouth is pronounced in full. It is all to do with the root of the words. He also had a problem with is name: Aaron (pronounced Aron not airon) Doherty (pronounced Dock-a-tee).


and of course the one miss-pronunciation (generaly by people from outside of GB) that always makes me cringe/giggle is Edinburgh and other places ending in the suffux -urgh being pronounced with a hard 'g' sound like it is Edinburg rather than Edinburah.

blueygh2
11-09-2008, 05:34 PM
Well I guess things with me won't be as funny as for other town names, since I'm in europe, and things are a little different here.
My hometown (if you can call it a town), in my mother tongue (luxembourgish) is written Mšertert, in german (and french) Mertert. About pronounciation, it's very hard to give an approximate pronounciation, so sorry about that (I did think quite some about how to write the pronounciation in english... )
[Oh, something came to my mind... you might try pronouncing it M-"air"-tit, with the "i" of tit replaced my the "a" of father, and don't pronounce the first "r", just make it sound like in "right".... That might give you an idea]

Something else, some towns have 3 names, one in luxembourgish, one in german and one in french. For example, …lwen, Ulflingen and Troisvierges are the name of one town, in lux, german and french. There are quite some other town names... (Some only have one in german/french and one in luxembourgish)

lelvsdgs
11-09-2008, 05:51 PM
I live in Eureka, pronounced yur-ee-kah. The funny thing is there is another town called Yreka (pronounced why-ree-kah) but most people pronounce Yreka like Eureka. And when I tell someone I'm from Eureka, they want to spell it with a Y. Very interesting.

Knitting_Guy
11-09-2008, 06:29 PM
Maggie's Nipples, WY

Been there!

cfaustino
11-09-2008, 11:02 PM
We actually have a town near us called Norfolk. But people pronounce it "Nor-fork". Some other weird ones by us:
Madrid (with the a pronounced like "cat")
Lima (Lie-ma)
Theresa (thuh-re-sa, not tuh-re-sa)

jess_hawk
11-11-2008, 06:26 PM
He also had a problem with is name: Aaron (pronounced Aron not airon) Doherty (pronounced Dock-a-tee).
I think the pronunciation of Aaron must be somewhat regional. My area, its Air-run, but I have a friend from NY state whose middle name is Aaron, and when I was guessing, he said no to "airun" and then when I gave up said, "it's a-run" and got really annoyed when I insisted that I already said that. BUT, some of my other friends couldn't even say it with a short "a" when they tried. We had another friend named "aaron" who tried to teach them to say it "right."
I also know some local Dohertys who pronounce it "Dorty"

Cynamar
11-15-2008, 01:04 AM
When I lived in New Jersey a new friend there, when I said I was from Missouri, told me about a friend who went to college in Arkansas at Ouachita (not sure I spelled it right but I can pronounce it!) and he was saying "Oo-a-chee-ta". I said, "You mean Washitah?" He looked surprised! I'm from Ironton, MO, and the more country folks there says "Arnton".

Cynamar
11-15-2008, 01:05 AM
One of my pet peeves is Sant Louis with a short a sound! Where the heck do you get that? The worst one for it, too, is my aunt whose maiden name is Saint Clair. I call her Sant Clair because I'm a smart-aleck.

newamy
11-16-2008, 09:32 PM
My town is Corvallis. It's pronounce cor-val-iss. I've heard people say cor-vuh-lis.

In Portland, Oregon there is a street called Glisan. Most people say Glee-son. But years ago a local news anchor insisted it was pronounced Gliss-an. If you look at the word he could be correct but I don't know the origin of the name.

Speaking of Oregon it is pronounce Or-e-gun. NOT Or-e-gone. People always say it wrong particularly in the mid west and the east.

This is an interesting thread. I've learned how some towns are pronounced that I didn't otherwise know how to say.

Debkcs
11-16-2008, 11:22 PM
My town is Corvallis

Hi Amy! Obviously, I'm in Salem. Not hard to say, right? Well, a few days ago I heard "Say-laam". "Or-a-gone" is bad enough.

Kuebler Road, that everyone pronounces "Cu-bler", is named after one of the founding families who pronounced their name "Keebler" like so many elves.

Corvallis is one of my favorite towns, lot's of shopping there that we don't have here in Salem, state capitol or not.