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JustAFloridaGirl
12-09-2008, 05:15 PM
Let me clarify my thread title a little bit. Everybody, through their profession (or hobby or whatever,) knows something a little extra about the subject that the average person isn't generally aware of. Unfortunately, in my opinion, a lot of this knowledge is stuff that the average person SHOULD know.

For example, the commercials from Wal-Mart touting the Blu-Ray disc players is really irking me. My husband has worked in electronics and could tell you that unless you have a high definition television ALONG WITH that Blu-Ray disc player, you're not going to tell a difference in the quality of your movie.

So what do you know? I guess consider this a sort of "PSA" thread.

Jan in CA
12-09-2008, 05:48 PM
:think: Good question..what do I know?

Well, as a former hairdresser I know that cutting your hair won't make it grow faster. It may seem like it does if you are cutting off split ends, but hair is dead once it's out of your head so cutting does nothing, but make it look better.

Abbily
12-09-2008, 05:53 PM
As a legal assistant, I know that you should never lie in any official way, or forge another person's signature (or let them forge yours). And, you should always read things before you sign them! If you sign a contract giving up your rights in some way, or giving someone rights they don't already have, it's pretty hard to get out of that kind of situation.

mwhite
12-09-2008, 06:29 PM
As a seamstress, I learned the single most important information about woven fabric is that:
Straight-grain(in line with the selvage or vertical), has no stretch Cross-grain(oposite direction of the selvage or horizontal),has a fair amount of stretch and
Bias grain(from corner to opposite corner), has a tremendous amount of stretch and will only slightly ravel.
These factors will always determine the drape and ease in any woven fabric project.

evona
12-09-2008, 06:50 PM
As a legal assistant in the personal injury field I can tell you not to wait until you talk to a lawyer to see a doctor. If you're really hurt your health obviously comes first and it just makes you look like an opportunist if you talked to your lawyer first. I can also tell you that just because someone DID call their lawyer first does not mean they weren't hurt. Some people really are hurting after an accident but afraid to do anything without knowing legal ramifications first. Especially those people who have a brother, sister, son, daughter, friend, etc that is a lawyer of any kind - this is a mistake!!! Obviously take care of yourself no matter what.

I can also tell you to always get uninsured/underinsured motorist coverage. I've seen too many horrible, life altering accidents caused by uninsured motorists where the victim had no coverage in that regard.

IN addition I can tell you to prepare for a fight if you ever do need uninsured motorists coverage. You pay your insurance company for years for the product, but they aren't in the business to pay it out easily. We have client's in their 3rd and 4th year fighting with their OWN insurance company after being hit by an uninsured driver. This is especially true for insurance companies like Mercury and 21st Century/AIG.

If you ever need the services of an attorney please be sure to get the documents they ask for back to them in a timely manner. It may seem like a lot of work, but just think, the assistants have to do that work 10 fold. If you do not get documents back to your attorney in a timely manner it may result in serious repercussions to you, including sanctions (fines) from the court and the dismissal of your case. If you've hired a quality attorney he/she is working hard for you and the little he/she asks of you has to be done for your own benefit.

Lets see, what else - I can tell you not to fall for the commercials on the air right now for Allstate. The ones where President Palmer of 24 tells you how horrible it is to be in the defendant's seat alone and how the plaintiff can wipe you out of your child's college fund. #1 - all auto insurance policies include a clause that they will provide free defense to you should you be sued as a result of an accident. This is not a special perk for being an Allstate insured. If you are ever sued in such a regard send the papers you're served with to your insurance adjuster ASAP and they will send it to a qualified defense attorney. #2 - If you have done nothing that warrants punitive (punishing) damages (like driving drunk or on drugs or driving recklessly or racing) the insurance carrier is responsible for any verdict in excess of the policy limits. if your insurance company has properly defended your case they should know its value and not have allowed an excess verdict in the first place.

Yes there is a chance you may get an excess verdict if your case goes to trial. If you were driving under the influence or injured people as a result of a speed contest you better bet a jury will want to punish you with punitive damages (that's why most insurance companies try to settle those cases quick!!! They have a contractual obligation to give you the best defense possible) The only time I have ever seen an insurance company deny coverage was when a kid stole his parents car and picked up some friends. he decided to drive extremely fast down a local street to impress the one girl in the car, lost control of his vehicle, went over the center bay of the street and hit a tree. he was excluded from his parent's policy so they denied coverage. BTW - the girl was NOT impressed. The Traffic Collision report indicated that she was screaming at him for being an idiot and told the cops how scared she was when she was later interviewed.

That brings me to another point DON'T exclude your driving age children from your policy. even angels make mistakes and do things like I mentioned above. The extra premium is certainly nothing compared to the damage that can be caused if they take the car out for a "quick" joyride and get in an accident.

I guess that's it for now :wink:


Oh - I have to add one thing I know about the environmental stewardship I do. The U.S. Forest Service is legally prohibited to lobby in their own regard. Therefore, it is up to the people who enjoy their forests to lobby for them. I just came back from a volunteer trip cleaning out a marijuana camp that was busted on U.S. Forest land in Los Padres NF (write up soon) WHAT A MESS!!! We found everything from razors to underwear to hypodermic needles deep in our forest and took out 600 pounds of it. Its OUR land!!! We should speak up :)

OK - off the soap box too :roflhard:

newamy
12-09-2008, 07:09 PM
As a nurse I can tell you many many things. But here are some that might be useful from a practical stand point:

I can tell you that good hand washing is the the number one way to prevent the spread of infection and viruses. Statistically doctors do not wash there hands as often as nurses. If you have a concern ask your doctor to wash his hands. Simply wearing gloves is not enough.

I can tell you that it' okay to question your doctor. If you are given a medicine and don't understand why or what it is for ask. If a course of treatment hasn't helped speak up and say so. If you don't want a test say so or ask why it is necessary. Don't ever assume that just because the doctor says to do something that it is correct. Often it is the right thing, but always clarify and ask questions, this is your right.

I can tell you that an elderly or compromised person will not benefit from lots of rest. Lying down without exercise even for a day will cause the loss of muscle mass. This translates to weakness and makes a person prone to pneumonia and bed sores. Always encourage an older person who may be recovering from some sort of illness or surgery to move as much as possible with intermittent rest periods. If therapy is offered encourage participation. In other words use it or loose it. In fact this is a very good reason to have a regular exercise plan, even mild to moderate exercise done regularly will help someone recover from an illness faster.

I can tell you that if you quit smoking you will be healthier.

That's it for now.

cristina61
12-09-2008, 08:34 PM
I used to type up California DMV hearings. I learned quite a lot from listening to lawyers defending people who had been stopped for drunk driving.

How’s this: if you’re in California and you’re pulled over for suspected DUI, the best thing you can do is fully cooperate with the police officer (even if you think he’s wrong) and don’t try to argue with him or her.

If the officer asks you to choose between a breath test or a blood test, you MUST choose one or the other (I can’t tell you which one to choose!). If you refuse both, you ARE going to have your license suspended.

Also, as much as you might like to get on the phone and call your lawyer immediately, while still at scene, you really need to wait until you’re at the station (assuming the officers decided to take you into custody). I heard about lots of people who got angry because they wanted to phone their lawyers from the scene of the traffic stop and ask which test to choose or they tried to get their lawyers to talk to the cops and straighten things out. It doesn’t work that way. Once the cops have pulled you over, you need to follow their instructions, and that’s all. Anything else will only annoy the cops and make you look bad later on.

Of course, all this can be avoided by remembering one important thing: Don’t Drink And Drive!! :thumbsup:

Hildegard_von_Knittin
12-09-2008, 10:00 PM
I am a music teacher. Two things I know are that "C" and "do" (as in do a deer) are not the same thing, and that a quarter note and "ta" and "1" are not the same thing.

Unless you're in elementary school.

I also know that kids are very good at instantly repeating exactly what they hear... this doesn't mean they know it.

Debbie
12-09-2008, 10:45 PM
I am a school librarian. I know that Biography's are in the "92" section of the Dewey Decimal System ... but unlike other non-fiction books, they are not in order by number, and unlike fiction books, they are not in alphabetical order by the author's last name. They are in alphabetical order by the last name of the person the book is about.

Mike
12-10-2008, 01:24 AM
Don't swim in chlorine pools with jewelry on. Also don't wear them when cleaning with bleach.

The pools take a while but a dip in a strong bleach solution will trash them. It refines the non-gold/non-silver out and you end up with micro-cracks and it acts like it's brittle. Nothing can fix it.
There are other chemicals that are worse but this is the most common.

Gertie
12-10-2008, 01:30 AM
I was taught that you never threaten legal action. If youre not willing to do it, say nothing.

In the elderly, the taste buds begin to die. The sweet tasters are the last to go. If trying to get an elderly person to eat, try something sweet (if Dr. allows). Meats can taste bitter.

saracidaltendencies
12-10-2008, 02:09 AM
Hmmm.....


I know that compared to the vast amount of knowledge out there, I know nothing :teehee:

GinnyG
12-10-2008, 06:21 AM
As an RN and a Critical Care EMT I suppose I know lots of "stuff" but newamy has covered the nursing so I'll focus on Emergency Medicine.

I know that if you wear your seat belt EVERY time you get in a car you will greatly increase the chance of surviving an automobile accident. And that airbags in cars greatly reduce your risk of death.

I know that people who fall asleep driving are ALWAYS the ones who think it wouldn't happen to them, Don't drive when you are sleepy.

I know that drinking and driving is NEVER a good idea.

I know that ALL EMT's would much rather take a person to the hospital with chest pain that turns out to be indigestion than to be called to a home with a patient who is in cardiac arrest because they were embarressed to call the ambulance.

OOH, I will share one "nursey" thing. As a Cardiac Rehab Nurse I know that an hour of aerobic exercise fits into everyones schedule because 24 hours of dead doesn't!!

Luvmyrottnboy
12-10-2008, 08:59 AM
Hmmm...as a former personal trainer/group exercise instructor I know you can't spot reduce, static stretching should be done after exercise, and weight training, in addition to aerobic training, is crucial for overall fitness. And unless you are an elite athlete, water is better than sports drinks.

As a manager of a college dorm I know that college students will always think up a way to torture (I mean that in a good way! I LOVE my residents!) you. After 6 years they still surprise me.

As a former care giver to my mom who has Alzheimer's disease, I know that anyone can do anything if they have to!:)

cheley
12-10-2008, 10:23 AM
Let's see...As a former no children person (career person to boot)...I can tell you that taking on "mommyhood" LATER IN LIFE is very exhausting, demanding, nerve racking sucks the life out of you at times (I can go on and on and on) but one of the most rewarding and gratifying things I have every done..and wouldn't change it for the world!!!!!

Crycket
12-10-2008, 11:52 AM
As a former Box Office clerk I can tell you that there are always tickets (live shows and potentially concerts) on hold for the cast/crew. It is in there contract. These tickets do get released to the public until closer to show time. They are usually nice ones close to the front, and it usually boils down to luck as to if you can get your hands on them (right time and place deal)
But a good rule of thumb is, if you haven't gotten good tix for a show, and you still want them, call the phone room every time you get a chance within two days of the show. If you are persistant, you will likely get something...and something good! Rememer that this is not guarenteed...the cast/crew may just be using all their seats for the show...and that they are not usually discounted...

It is never good to bring a babe-in-arms. But if you must, do check the theatres policy. You may be charged for the infant, or worse, thrown out of the theatre with it. Beyond which, you don't need to expose your young child to a loud show...I have a former co-worker with hearing loss cause her parents neglected to think of this....

Always check if going to the venue is going to save you a service charge. If it is convienent go down in person...it could save you a lot of money...there is often a $5+ charge PER TICKET if you book on the phone that is either reduced or eliminated by going in person. (This rule should be ignored if you are interested in my first point...if you want the released seats that could potentially come up, the time it takes you to go to the venue in person could lose you the tix)

Actors (in live theatre shows...) usually don't mind giving autographs. Check with the theatre to see if there is a stage door, and if the cast and crew is likely to be there after the show.

I am sure there is more...but it will require more thinking....

Spikey
12-10-2008, 12:38 PM
Following on the topic of good hand hygiene, at our center, we've been taught that alcohol-based hand cleansers (like Purell) are actually more effective at killing germs than soap and water.

The recommendation we got is to wash with soap and water when there is visible dirt or contamination on your hands, but to use a hand sanitizer if your hands "look" clean.

This has an additional benefit of keeping your hands from drying out from washing frequently. Dry skin is more likely to crack or be damaged from minor trauma, and any cut or scratch on the skin harbors germs.

cftwo
12-10-2008, 03:13 PM
I work in higher education. The one thing people should know is that you should never judge the cost to you of an institution by the "sticker price." Different schools will give you different types of financial aid, and you MAY end up writing a smaller check to a private school than you would have writtent to a public school, so check out your options and don't reject one just because of the sticker price.

And, all the research shows that the best education occurs because YOU make the most of the opportunities at whatever school you attend. Just going to Harvard (for example) isn't enough. If you go to Harvard and do the minimum, you probably won't have as good of an education as if you go to another school and push yourself to do more. In other words, osmosis isn't the best way to be educated.

auburnchick
12-10-2008, 04:02 PM
I'm loving this thread!!!

Pearls of wisdom...

A few things I know...


Google is my friend. I use it to find the answer to almost all of my questions.
Placing a slice of bread in the cookie dispenser keeps the cookies soft.
Adding a tablespoon of water to your scrambled egg mixture makes them fluffier

knitgal
12-10-2008, 07:53 PM
Hmmm....As a retail employee, I know that you should always wash your new clothes when you get them home. Seriously. There's lots of chemicals on them and other people have tried them on.

I know that if there's something wrong with a piece of clothing (a snag or whatever) they should give you a bit of a discount.

I know that you shouldn't shop anywhere without a good return policy. Ask BEFORE you buy, not after.

I know that you should treat sales associates with kindness and respect, not only because it's the right thing to do, but also because if you're nice they can do more for you (i.e. discounts!). Also, don't treat them as though they are stupid, many of us have a lot of education and are trying to get our "real" jobs.

I know that you should always buy good shoes when you will be standing or walking in them a lot. Save the cheapies and the 5 inch heels for sitting!

I know that you can never overspray a pair of boots with protector. Spray away! Spray freely! Also, shoe polishes and sprays never go bad- don't believe anyone that tells you so.

..I'll probably think of more later!

Dangles
12-10-2008, 09:28 PM
I know that I am more educated after reading this thread :) Thanks everyone.

saracidaltendencies
12-10-2008, 11:09 PM
Seriously, I don't know if it's the Mommy's IQ has lowered factor or what but I've been trying really hard to think of something useful I know and I keep drawing a blank! :eyes: :teehee:

thecatsmother
12-10-2008, 11:31 PM
As a longtime member of TOPS(take off pounds sensibly)I know that those who write down everything they eat are more successful at losing weight and keeping it off.
That you can never eat too many vegetables.
To maintain weight loss exercise has to become a part of your day and that fad diets don't work

auburnchick
12-10-2008, 11:56 PM
Seriously, I don't know if it's the Mommy's IQ has lowered factor or what but I've been trying really hard to think of something useful I know and I keep drawing a blank! :eyes: :teehee:


Nawww...I think that you're probably trying to find something novel...aside from what "everyone" knows.

Oh, and btw, I still have mommy brain, and my kids are 16 (almost 17) and 14.

:hug:

Gertie
12-11-2008, 12:44 AM
I know that you should treat sales associates with kindness and respect, not only because it's the right thing to do, but also because if you're nice they can do more for you (i.e. discounts!).

I know that you should always buy good shoes when you will be standing or walking in them a lot. Save the cheapies and the 5 inch heels for sitting!

Oh, yes! I know a woman who treated a counter person kindly & with compliments after the um... not nice woman before her was so hateful. My friend was surprised with a first class plane seat for no additional charge!

My Podiatrist says that people pay $5.00 for shoes they'll be standing & walking in for many hours and pay much, much more for shoes they'll wear for only a little while. This leads to problems. (No, that's not why I was there.) :teehee:

saracidaltendencies
12-11-2008, 01:07 AM
Oh, and btw, I still have mommy brain, and my kids are 16 (almost 17) and 14.


Aw man, I was hoping the older the kids got the more my memory would return! :teehee:

evona
12-11-2008, 05:59 AM
Seriously, I don't know if it's the Mommy's IQ has lowered factor or what but I've been trying really hard to think of something useful I know and I keep drawing a blank! :eyes: :teehee:

I bet you know alot on the subject of being a mommy! Seriously, don't sell yourself short. A bunch of people on the forum are expecting and your advice might be just what they need :wink:

Jaxhil
12-11-2008, 08:15 AM
I feel the SAME way!! But I am sure *you* know a LOT of useful and unique things :thumbsup:

Jaxhil
12-11-2008, 08:23 AM
Okay, on the subject of Mommyhood I might have some useful advice:

1) Mommies really *should* (read must!) take naps when their little ones do~you deserve and NEED the rest! The housework will always be there later (lol).

2) Its okay to let them cry themselves to sleep~they will learn to sleep when its time, and Mommy won't be a Basket-Case from lack of sleep. (I had to learn this the hard way~in the long run you BOTH will cry less, lol!!).

3) Take time to do things for yourself only. Like a bubble~bath, or reading a good book, or (of course!) time for knitting!! Try and get out of the house for some fun time for yourself (while Daddy or another trusted caretaker) watches the baby.

Hope that is useful to someone! Thanks everyone for all the good advice!

hartleystudio
12-11-2008, 08:58 AM
I'm a goldsmith and I second Mike's post about chlorine and jewelry, it will just eat it all up, hot tubs are the worst!

I know that even if you buy the highest color and clarity diamond in the world, if the proportion is off and the cut bad it won't sparkle. It will always look dirty and dark. Buy the best cut you can and you can skimp on the color and clarity.

I also know that you should NEVER sleep in your jewelry. Sleeping in your jewlery wears the prongs down on rings and earrings and stretches out chains. It's also not good for your fingers. I can't count how many rings I have cut off people who never took them off and their fingers "grew" around them. Your jewelry will last longer and look nicer if you don't sleep in it.

One more thing, cheap-o jewelry from the mass retailers skimp on the gold in the mountings and when they break, they can't be fixed....

That's what I know....:aww:

shelluie
12-11-2008, 09:37 AM
When I used to waitress, I discovered that a cup of soup and a bowl of soup are the same size in many restaraunts. The bowl looks bigger but isn't as deep as the cup. Also, a large pop is the same as a medium. Again, it looks like you are getting more pop because the large glass appears to be bigger, but in reality it's the same size because the glass in thicker.

Mike
12-11-2008, 11:41 AM
One from my nephew (a cop), put your car visor either straight down or forward. Never have it angled back towards you or you'll get scalped in a front end crash.

I can't count how many rings I have cut off people who never took them off and their fingers "grew" around them.
Need a barf icon. That reminds me of a crazy (literally) lady that would come into a store I worked at.

sakura-panda
12-11-2008, 03:32 PM
I'm a goldsmith and I second Mike's post about chlorine and jewelry, it will just eat it all up, hot tubs are the worst!

I know that even if you buy the highest color and clarity diamond in the world, if the proportion is off and the cut bad it won't sparkle. It will always look dirty and dark. Buy the best cut you can and you can skimp on the color and clarity.

I also know that you should NEVER sleep in your jewelry. Sleeping in your jewlery wears the prongs down on rings and earrings and stretches out chains. It's also not good for your fingers. I can't count how many rings I have cut off people who never took them off and their fingers "grew" around them. Your jewelry will last longer and look nicer if you don't sleep in it.

One more thing, cheap-o jewelry from the mass retailers skimp on the gold in the mountings and when they break, they can't be fixed....

That's what I know....:aww:


I had no idea! :shock:

I sleep in my earrings and my necklace. (I only wear my rings when I leave the house. As soon as I walk in the door they come off.)

I probably won't stop :blush: but it is still good to know! :lol:

sakura-panda
12-11-2008, 03:34 PM
I don't know anything today ;) but I'll be sure to add something when I do! :) This is a cool thread! :thumbsup:

saracidaltendencies
12-11-2008, 04:16 PM
Ok, I got one....I know if your son ever asks you if you want a knuckle sandwich, and you think he won't actually do it, you're wrong :roflhard:

Explanation...

Last night my 4yo son was lying on my lap and we were being silly when he asks me, "do you want a knuckle sandwich" with a raised fist. I reply, "hmmm, maybe I would like a knuckle sandwich" thinking there's no way he's really gonna do it. In the blink of an eye, I got socked in the jaw! :roflhard::roflhard:

I started laughing hysterically...I mean, I suppose I deserved it since I basically said yes...lol...But, I had my face covered so he wouldn't see me laughing (I don't want him to think that was ok), and hubby got at him for hitting mama. My son replied with, "but she's laughing!" to which I replied, no I'm not, I'm crying" and I made him believe I was really crying instead of laughing. Well, he felt badly about it and apologized and said he wouldn't do it again, but man! That's probably one of the funniest things that has happened to me in a while, I straight up got beaten up by my 4 year old! :roflhard:

So yes, I now know never tell a kid you'd like a knuckle sandwich :teehee:

Debkcs
12-11-2008, 07:52 PM
It's so cute that you thought he wouldn't hit you, he's a boy!:rofl: Physical comedy is routine for them.

What I know: no matter what you have been telling yourself, anybody can make any recipe,as long as you have the right (good) ingredients and utensils. No matter how complicated a recipe looks, it will break down into simple steps. Viola! You're a cook!

As a former nurse: the doctor is not always right. No how, no way. If any doc (or nurse for that matter) tells you something that goes against your better judgement, get a second, or third if need be, opinion.

As a married person for over 35 years: marriage isn't a "50/50 proposition". It has to be 100% each way for it to survive. Selfishness on one or both parts is the main reason marriages fail.

MoniDew
12-12-2008, 03:30 PM
What do I know?

You can decaffeinate any tea by pouring boiling water over it, wait for 30-45 seconds, pour that water off, then steep as usual. 90% of the caffeine is released in the first 30-45 seconds.
________
Indica strains (http://strainindex.com)

saracidaltendencies
12-12-2008, 04:04 PM
Now I know to never do that! :teehee: I need my caffeine...haha

suziehomemaker
12-12-2008, 05:19 PM
As a sales person I know that the best time of year to make major purchases is at the end of a quarter (March 31, June 30, Sept 30 and Dec 31). Most sales reps have quarterly quotas and are willing to give the best discounts no matter how well their sales are doing at that time.

This works for buying vehicles, major appliances, electronics anything where there might be a big mark up added to the cost.

All you need to to is ask for their best price and be prepared to walk away if you don't get something in your expected range.

Krystal
12-12-2008, 10:29 PM
I know a couple things from working in fast food...

honking in the drive thru lane won't make it move faster

kindness will get you everywhere, and get you much more.

I know you aren't allergic to pickles or onions if you eat big macs. Even if you get them without pickles or onions, they still come in the sauce. :teehee: (the amount of people that claim they are make me laugh.)

I know I do not juggle the eggs when I crack them on the grill. (if you saw the commercial there was nothing at all even close to the real deal, except the eggs)

I know I really enjoy my job, and I work with some of the best people, and I know I hate it when people look down on me for working in fast food.

Mike
12-12-2008, 11:59 PM
I know you aren't allergic to pickles or onions if you eat big macs. Even if you get them without pickles or onions, they still come in the sauce. :teehee: (the amount of people that claim they are make me laugh.)
Yeah but those finely chopped onions (not the big ones for quarter pounder) are really bad, I mean rotten bad.
I'm allergic to eating rotten food :rofl:

JustAFloridaGirl
12-14-2008, 02:18 AM
Yeah but those finely chopped onions (not the big ones for quarter pounder) are really bad, I mean rotten bad.
I'm allergic to eating rotten food :rofl:

Actually, the true problem with those little onions is that they're dehydrated. And yes, they have to be re-hydrated before they're put out to use, which means soaking them in water. Gross. Ugh, that crap would get everywhere in the dish sink.

Krystal, anybody who knocks a person for working fast food is an idiot. My first job was at McDonald's at the age of 16 and, while I hated the job itself, the people I worked with were pretty awesome. I also put myself through college while working there...I had a partial scholarship and what the scholarship didn't pay for my McDonald's paycheck made up the rest.

kellyh57
12-14-2008, 11:32 AM
Speaking of McDonald's...I've been doing mystery shopping for a few months now. One of the clients I do is McDonald's. They have really high standards to adhere to. I'm just amazed at how well the restaurants are run. I don't particularly like McD's (not into greasy food-most fast-food!) but I've been doing breakfast shops and I LOVE their breakfast sandwiches. Now, whenever I go to any fast-food place, I'm wondering why it's taking longer than McD's would or why they didn't "ask for the sale" or whatever. I guess I never that they had that high of standards and I'm amazed at how far below some places fall!

Kelly

zkimom
12-15-2008, 10:57 AM
What I know: if you don't take care of yourself first before you meet the needs of everyone around you, if you wait to fulfill your desires and dreams until you've taken care of everyone else, if you don't indulge yourself a little bit because you're too busy seeing to the needs of everyone else then before you know it, it will be too late.

It's kind of like being on an airplane in an emergency and remembering to grab your oxygen mask first before helping anyone else.

TEMA
12-15-2008, 04:01 PM
I am the caregiver of my husband who has epilepsy and heart problems. He's had two operations - one a triple bypass - the other brain surgery to remove his right hippocampus...
Here's what I know...
Seizures are not all in your head.
Seizures are in your head.
Seizures are like lightning strikes. In my dh's case, the lightning strikes hit his right hippocampus with deadly accuracy and in the end when the dr removed it, it was the size of a pea, withered and burnt up.
I know that coffee and/or grapefruit will countermand the medications and cause seizures.
I know the difference between petit mal and grand mal and another seizure type that most people and some dr's don't know of or understand - that is called partial complex seizures (my dh has this).
This is the kind of seizure that causes you to not know what you are doing but whatever you were thinking of doing before the seizure starts, that is what you will continue to do. Many is the time I had to bodily stand in front of my dh to stop him from crossing the road in front of him while in seizure.
I know that some people with epilepsy know when a seizure is about to start and some have no idea at all.
I know that seizures are not just about the seizure but about the 'come-down' time as well and that the come down time can last longer than the seizure, itself, and is sometimes unrecognizable by those watching as being anything out of the ordinary.
I know that some firehalls still treat a person in seizure using old wives tales instead of what is necessary. For instance, 'put you fingers in the mouth of a person in seizure so that they don't swallow their tongue'... This is a good way to lose your fingers. Best to make sure they are not hurting themselves is about all you can do.
I know that when a person has had a seizure and done the come down, it is best to be very kind to them. They don't know what just happened. They feel very tired tho and in some cases - quite lost.
I know that having seizures has nothing to do with your mentality.
And finally - I'm not sure that this happens to women (certainly, my daughter, who has epilepsy as well - she's not my dh's kin - doesn't seem to experience this final item).
Namely - seizures can make men very horny...:aww:
It's true.... like I said - I know this... LOL!
TEMA
:wink:

Abbily
12-16-2008, 12:40 PM
Wow, TEMA, thanks for sharing all of that!

One more thing I know as a legal assistant doing a bit of real estate work: when you sell or buy property, read your deed and make sure it's right! Lawyers, realtors and title companies all make mistakes, and if your deed is wrong it can be very time consuming and frustrating to get it fixed- especially if the person discovering the mistake wasn't originally involved in the transaction!

OK, one more thing- I know that I am not legally allowed to give legal advice, so please take anything I have written as SUGGESTION, and not as legal advice. I do NOT have a law degree!

knitgal
12-16-2008, 01:06 PM
I thought of another retail thing I know:

In women's sizing, odd sizes (1,3,5,7,9,11) are "junior" sizes whereas even sizing (0,2,4,6,8,10,12 etc.) are women's sizes.

Many women don't understand why they can't fit into their size 9 pants from one store but a size 6 is fine at another and it's because women's clothing fits differently than juniors.

Krystal
12-16-2008, 08:17 PM
Yeah but those finely chopped onions (not the big ones for quarter pounder) are really bad, I mean rotten bad.
I'm allergic to eating rotten food :rofl:

They are not rotten, they are delicious! haha they have to be rehydrated very specifically... (cold water for an hour in the fridge) a lot of people don't use enough water or hot water and that makes them so gross. hot water makes them gummy and brown... not enough makes them crunchy.


Actually, the true problem with those little onions is that they're dehydrated. And yes, they have to be re-hydrated before they're put out to use, which means soaking them in water. Gross. Ugh, that crap would get everywhere in the dish sink.

Krystal, anybody who knocks a person for working fast food is an idiot. My first job was at McDonald's at the age of 16 and, while I hated the job itself, the people I worked with were pretty awesome. I also put myself through college while working there...I had a partial scholarship and what the scholarship didn't pay for my McDonald's paycheck made up the rest.

Yes those little onions gets EVERYWHERE... Literally I found some in my bra once when I got home... Don't know how I managed that but seriously! Those are my favourite type of onions tho. I like them small.


I started at McD's when I was 15 and quit when I was 16. I came back at another store when I was 19 and I am 24 now, and at yet another store, but have been with the comapany since I was 19. I work full time days kitchen, and work with the best group of women...heck, I met my husband here. Given how my city is a car factory city (Chrysler and Ford) I am grateful to have a good paying job, full time hours and a job I don't hate. How many people can say they don't hate their jobs... or that they even HAVE a job these days?


Speaking of McDonald's...I've been doing mystery shopping for a few months now. One of the clients I do is McDonald's. They have really high standards to adhere to. I'm just amazed at how well the restaurants are run. I don't particularly like McD's (not into greasy food-most fast-food!) but I've been doing breakfast shops and I LOVE their breakfast sandwiches. Now, whenever I go to any fast-food place, I'm wondering why it's taking longer than McD's would or why they didn't "ask for the sale" or whatever. I guess I never that they had that high of standards and I'm amazed at how far below some places fall!

Kelly

Yes we really do have some pretty high standards, sometimes it feel impossible. You wouldn't believe the pressure behind the counter to get it right, make it right, do it right.

It kind of shocks me to see what a step down some other fast food places are. But it's no surprise McDonald's is number one then.

Syndi
12-18-2008, 01:25 AM
As an accountant, I know that people who think they are saving money by paying interest on a mortgage loan are actually losing money. If you have the ability to avoid home mortgage interest (pay off your loan), then ultimately you save money.

For example, if you pay $100 in interest expense, and assuming you are in a 25% tax bracket, then that $100 deduction saved you approxmiately $25 in taxes. So your net cash outlflow is $75 and yes, you "saved" $25. However you had to pay $100 to save $25. If you can avoid paying the interest all together, then you can save the full $100.

Tax credits are a different matter in that they typically reduce your tax liability $ for $. But virtually all tax deductions only reduce your tax by a fraction of the amount of $$ you spent in order to get the deduction.

evona
12-18-2008, 05:06 AM
Tax credits are a different matter in that they typically reduce your tax liability $ for $. But virtually all tax deductions only reduce your tax by a fraction of the amount of $$ you spent in order to get the deduction.

So look for deductions in the things you have to pay for (i.e. - business expenses) but don't spend money just for the deduction. Is that right? I am so not a financial person so I am always interested in learning about this stuff so I can stretch the little money I have as far as I can.

KnitWit1987
12-18-2008, 08:32 AM
This is really stupid, but I know not to buy a black sink if you have hard water. I wanted one to match my appliances and I totally regret it. Everynight you can find me using a million paper towels to make sure there is not one drop of water in my sink :aww: It causes horrible stains that wont go away.

mwhite
12-18-2008, 08:56 AM
I feel your pain!!!! CLR works wonders on the stains but just the extra efforts are a PITA! I don't have any black sinks but stainless steel doors and the hard water does leave water spots and jam up the coffee and ice makers. Ahhhh...love the country life though.

ArtLady1981
12-18-2008, 09:48 AM
As an ART CONSULTANT since 1980, I know this: Collect art like you collected your friends: because the artwork (and the friend) adds quality to your life!

AKA: Never add a piece of art to your home solely based upon 'matching your sofa'! Furniture wears out and goes away. Art doesn't. Then whaddaya do with the art? :??

The art in your home can complement furniture. But it doesn't have to.

The finest collections of art usually never "match" the decor.
Just like our friends. They don't need to "fit into" the decor either! ;)

ArtLady1981
12-18-2008, 09:51 AM
Your pharmacist usually knows more about the Rx than your doctor. Ask your pharmacist for information about your Rx. The info he can provide may surprise you.

cheley
12-19-2008, 02:18 PM
This is really stupid, but I know not to buy a black sink if you have hard water. I wanted one to match my appliances and I totally regret it. Everynight you can find me using a million paper towels to make sure there is not one drop of water in my sink :aww: It causes horrible stains that wont go away. Try scrubbing it down with Baking Soda, then shine up with Lemon Oil:shrug: might work...

ladyjessica
12-19-2008, 05:09 PM
I'm a financial aid counselor at a college, and here's the little bit I know: :teehee:

When applying for financial aid, make sure you meet all deadlines - federal, state, and school. Schools, especially state schools, don't always have a lot of institutional money to go around, so once you miss the deadline you're not very likely to get anything, and if you do, you'll probably be waiting until right before school starts.

When completing the Federal aid application, you do not have to wait until taxes are completed. You can estimate based on the prior year and fix it later. It's better to estimate and get it done before the deadline than to wait and miss out on grant money.

A grant is free money. A loan must be repaid. You would be amazed at the number of people who don't understand this.

A good GPA does not guarantee a scholarship.

It is not my fault that you missed the deadline, didn't complete your paperwork, or didn't follow directions. Therefore, it is not my job to fix it, nor do I HAVE to give you money just because you say I do.

Yelling and cursing at me and threatening my job will not make me want to help you.

Never, ever, ever pay anybody to do your applications for you. The federal application is free, scholarship applications and searches are free. There are places that charge between $80 and $500 to do the federal application for you, and upwards of $1000 to 'guarantee' you a scholarship. Obviously, this money would be better spent to the school. If you need help with the applications, anyone in the financial aid office should be more than happy to help you, for free.

I'm sure I know more, but that's all I know right now. :aww:

Crycket
12-19-2008, 06:50 PM
Your pharmacist usually knows more about the Rx than your doctor. Ask your pharmacist for information about your Rx. The info he can provide may surprise you.

This is totally true...I worked in a pharmacy for a few years back when I was in highschool. The Pharmacist does know a lot!


Oh some of the tales I could tell!

laikabear
12-20-2008, 07:52 PM
Veterinary medicine:

I know that if you don't start your puppy's vaccines on time and complete the entire vaccine series that the risk of them getting parvo is very, very high. I know that many people who didn't get the vaccines can't afford the treatment for parvo.

I know that most people don't have enough money set aside for an emergency with their pet, and they don't have pet health insurance. A lot of people ask me if they can get medical insurance for their pet when they come in hit by a car and need $5000 worth of care. (The answer is of course not, you can't buy insurance after something like that has happened).

I know that I euthanize a pet with a treatable disease because of financial constraints at least once a week and sometimes once a day. :( We offer a payment plan called Care Credit, but it is basically a credit card that you have to pay back, and many people have bad credit and can't qualify, or they know that they won't have any more money in the future, so they don't even apply.

I know that the following things are toxic and can be deadly: snail bait (metaldehyde), rat poison, antifreeze, lilies (in cats), grapes/ raisins (in dogs), onions, garlic, chocolate, xylitol (an artificial sweetener in sugarless gum and cookies), the plants Sago Palm and Brunfelsia (yesterday, today, and tomorrow plant), Tylenol, ibuprofen, naproxen...

I know that if you don't spay your female dog that there is a high likelihood that she will at some point get a life-threatening uterine infection (pyometra) that requires emergency surgery.

I know that un-neutered male dogs wander in search of a mate and are more likely to get hit by a car than neutered dogs.

I know if you have a Chihuahua the most common emergencies are Parvo, attacked by bigger dog and nearly killed, dystocia (female having difficulty giving birth and needs a C-section), and marijuana ingestion. :teehee:

I know that the most expensive dog to own when considering veterinary costs is an English Bulldog, yet many owners spend their last dime on the $2000 purchase price and can't afford adequate healthcare. The English Bulldog is a "lemon" - don't get one unless you like spending money at the vet.

I know that indoor cats live longer than outdoor cats.

I know that HUSBANDRY is the number one problem of reptiles, fish, rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas, ferrets, etc. Improper diet and improper housing cause most of their diseases!

I know that clients often believe their groomer, the pet store employee, their breeder, the internet, and their sister's boyfriend's cousin's plumber who used to work at a vet hospital (in the kennel) over me.

Fun thread!

cheley
12-21-2008, 12:31 AM
Veterinary medicine:

I know that if you don't start your puppy's vaccines on time and complete the entire vaccine series that the risk of them getting parvo is very, very high. I know that many people who didn't get the vaccines can't afford the treatment for parvo.

I know that most people don't have enough money set aside for an emergency with their pet, and they don't have pet health insurance. A lot of people ask me if they can get medical insurance for their pet when they come in hit by a car and need $5000 worth of care. (The answer is of course not, you can't buy insurance after something like that has happened).

I know that I euthanize a pet with a treatable disease because of financial constraints at least once a week and sometimes once a day. :( We offer a payment plan called Care Credit, but it is basically a credit card that you have to pay back, and many people have bad credit and can't qualify, or they know that they won't have any more money in the future, so they don't even apply.

I know that the following things are toxic and can be deadly: snail bait (metaldehyde), rat poison, antifreeze, lilies (in cats), grapes/ raisins (in dogs), onions, garlic, chocolate, xylitol (an artificial sweetener in sugarless gum and cookies), the plants Sago Palm and Brunfelsia (yesterday, today, and tomorrow plant), Tylenol, ibuprofen, naproxen...

I know that if you don't spay your female dog that there is a high likelihood that she will at some point get a life-threatening uterine infection (pyometra) that requires emergency surgery.

I know that un-neutered male dogs wander in search of a mate and are more likely to get hit by a car than neutered dogs.

I know if you have a Chihuahua the most common emergencies are Parvo, attacked by bigger dog and nearly killed, dystocia (female having difficulty giving birth and needs a C-section), and marijuana ingestion. :teehee:

I know that the most expensive dog to own when considering veterinary costs is an English Bulldog, yet many owners spend their last dime on the $2000 purchase price and can't afford adequate healthcare. The English Bulldog is a "lemon" - don't get one unless you like spending money at the vet.

I know that indoor cats live longer than outdoor cats.

I know that HUSBANDRY is the number one problem of reptiles, fish, rabbits, guinea pigs, chinchillas, ferrets, etc. Improper diet and improper housing cause most of their diseases!

I know that clients often believe their groomer, the pet store employee, their breeder, the internet, and their sister's boyfriend's cousin's plumber who used to work at a vet hospital (in the kennel) over me.

Fun thread! Wow awesome advice, now go check out the Help my cat is sick blog (by Princessbonniejane)and advise her what to do Hurry:hug:

Mike
12-21-2008, 01:09 AM
Veterinary medicine:

I know that if you don't start your puppy's vaccines on time and complete the entire vaccine series that the risk of them getting parvo is very, very high. I know that many people who didn't get the vaccines can't afford the treatment for parvo.

From an old horse person, I know that you can buy the vaccines at the farm store for about $5. If you can't give the shots it's easy enough to find a "dog person" who's done it (I'm deathly afraid of needles and I can give a dog a shot). There's no real excuse to not give them in puppies or any at risk dog.

I know that un-neutered male dogs wander in search of a mate and are more likely to get hit by a car than neutered dogs.
I'm sorry but I've rarely had neutered males and I've never (that's right NEVER) had one wander or get hit by a car.
Wandering/escaping is all about training and paying attention.
My male may sniff the air when the neighbor dog is in heat but he doesn't try to escape (and she even calls to him).

I also know from having fixed females and fixed males that fixed males are still interested in females in heat and fixed females still have periods when they are interesting to males.

MoniDew
12-21-2008, 01:12 AM
fixed females still have periods

how do they do that without a uterus. My vet said they remove the whole uterus, not just tie tubes.
________
BUY PORTABLE VAPORIZER (http://vaporizer.org/portable)

Mike
12-21-2008, 01:41 AM
how do they do that without a uterus. My vet said they remove the whole uterus, not just tie tubes.

LOL, you took that out of context.
They don't spot and all that.
They have periods of time where they make male dogs, fixed or not interested in them.

My fixed female would swell and "present" as much as any unfixed female I've seen.

And then when she wasn't in her heat (for lack of a better word) she would hump anything that moved just like a male.
I think she had a hormone issue.

laikabear
12-21-2008, 03:25 AM
Re: the princessbonniejane thread...

I did reply. The cat should be seen at the emergency clinic. There is no magical home treatment for an unknown illness (I am not convinced it was the cleaning chemical) causing protracted vomiting.

The emergency exam fee at my clinic is $98 during the day ($135 after 11 PM), and I practice in one of the most expensive/ affluent areas of the country. She stated that she was quoted $200, which I doubt was the exam fee only.

In my experience, there are few people who truly can't afford even an emergency exam for their pet. (And for those who cannot afford care, I will humanely euthanize their pet if it is too ill to recover for no charge, as will most veterinarians and the animal shelter.)

hartleystudio
12-21-2008, 09:57 AM
What a great part of this thread! I have to add that our 2 year old Vizsla got pancreatitus (sp?) and really almost died but our vet and the vet at the emergency clinic saved his life. It didn't save our walet, however. I wish we had had pet insurance! Yikes it cost us $2500 for almost two weeks at the vet! 3 days at the emergency vet $1300 and 12 days at the vet $950 (he gave us a discount :) ) We did have the money, but barely. I'm glad to have him back, glad to have had the money but I would NEVER want to go through that again. I lost 20 pounds too!!!

We are looking into pet insurance for him now!!!

Thanks for the useful post!

Becky Morgan
12-21-2008, 01:46 PM
I don't know where you practice, but your fees sound a lot better than what my friend had to pay for her cat in Washington, DC.
Walk-in emergency clinic fee, exam only: $400 daytime. The total bill for that day was $2000 for suspected multiple myeloma--one ultrasound, two flat plate X-rays and a bag of IV fluid to take home. He went into respiratory distress a few days later, and they took him back to the clinic. $400 for the visit, another $400 for euthanasia. One owner gave up her own medications for months to pay the bill. Mind you, if the staff had been kind or the vets had been forthcoming with any information, even a certain diagnosis, they'd have been willing to pay. When the vet told them Pumpkin might need chemo at $4000 a session for an uncertain number of weeks, they were trying to get the money together, but he passed on before the first treatment happened. Throughout, they had to pry information out of people, never saw the vet who said she treated the cat, and had no control over anything that happened.

They went looking for a more owner-friendly vet for their new cat, who is covered by pet insurance. She is a rescue and came fully vaccinated and spayed. Unfortunately, a special, half-price, get-acquainted visit at the least expensive vet they can find is $200 after the insurance discount.

Around here, prices are in line with yours, but that doesn't mean you can count on walking in with a sick cat or calling about a spay or neuter and getting help. There are two semi-retired vets who will spay and neuter rescues at cost if you know who to ask and where to go. Other than that, there's no discount help, no help from shelters (in fact, they will usually try to seize your other animals if you ask for help), and one no-kill shelter that can help a few people every few months. The "payment plans" and "just offer to clean cages or something" arrangements people talk about...heh...sudffice it to say that Does Not Happen Here. The one emergency clinic is a half-hour drive in good weather and traffic. Most of our local vets either don't accept pet insurance or accept a very few plans on a limited basis. In short, if you don't have a major credit card on you with plenty of available credit and the will to say "Do anything you need to", you're sunk and so is your animal. As far as euthanasia, you can get the shelter to do it for $45, but you can't be with the animal.

JustAFloridaGirl
12-21-2008, 03:18 PM
Relaying another thing my husband, who works in electronics, knows:

Windows Vista requires 3 GB of RAM to run properly. Most computers that you buy in the store only have 2 GB of RAM. That's why so many people have trouble with Vista.

Of course, that commercial that's been playing lately about the Windows Mojave experiment tries to make it simply look like the average person just doesn't know how to utilize the program.

laikabear
12-21-2008, 06:58 PM
Becky, I don't believe a word of what you said regarding the fees in Washington DC. There is no emergency clinic in the US that charges $400 just for an exam. Perhaps she was paying an additional fee to see a cancer specialist in addition to the emergency doctor. Most specialist initial consult exams cost $150-$200. I don't know what your friend told you, but you ARE mistaken. A workup for a sick pet with multiple myeloma might be $4000 depending on what was done and if the pet was hospitalized or saw a specialist. The chemo prices sound inflated (ie I don't believe they were that high). However, chemotherapy is expensive and the charge per dose for certain drugs (carboplatin, most likely) is $1000 to $1500, maybe more for a large dog. Carboplatin is made out of PLATINUM and is a human drug that costs US a lot of money to use. Plus an IV catheter has to be placed, the pet has to stay in the hospital at least for the day, and bloodwork has to be checked before each infusion to make sure the pet has enough white and red blood cells to receive treatment. If you personally were getting treatment with that drug the cost would be at least 10-20 times MORE per dose, but your insurance or Medicare/ Medicaid would pay for it. $400 for euthanasia probably included the disposal (cremation), as well as an IV catheter placed so the pet could be with the owner and the injection given easily. That sounds a little steep but not outrageous, especially if they just walked in and did not make an appointment. Overall, your friend's experience sounds exaggerated as to the costs.

In a specialty hospital with lots of doctors, yeah, the one who admits your case may not be the one who treats it or talks to you later. We aren't robots. I work the night shift, and the next day another doctor manages the case. You would not believe the number of owners that think I should just be at the hospital 24-7 personally (it is OPEN 24-7 and there is always a doctor there, it's just not always me because, GASP, I have a life and do occasionally sleep). Going to a specialist at a big hospital with a very sick pet is not like going to your family vet and can be a little strange and upsetting, especially when your pet is really sick. They probably didn't give all the answers because they didn't HAVE all the answers. Sometimes with serious illnesses we don't have a definite diagnosis or prognosis. That is just the way medicine is. It is the same in human medicine.

As for the vets in your area not taking payment plans or letting you clean cages, we are running a business, not a charity. If you want a loan, go to the bank or a friend. If they won't loan you money, why would a vet? Do you ask for a payment plan at the grocery store? Pet insurance plans are not like human insurance plans. YOU pay the vet and the company reimburses you after you submit paperwork. There is nothing for the vet to accept or not accept. So your statement that vets won't take the plans is untrue. At our clinic we also take Care Credit, which is like a credit card. They charge us 10% of our fees (unlike credit card companies which charge 3% or so). But we do it so we can help the most number of people who are in need as possible.

Why would you expect a discount for spaying or neutering your pet from a veterinarian? We should just eat the cost of that surgery and do it for free? In fact, most vets barely cover their costs on those 2 surgeries BECAUSE we try to encourage people to do it. They are considered a "loss leader" as are our vaccine plans. If you were "spayed" at the hospital the cost would be $40,000 or so. I think the $400 we charge for a large dog to have abdominal surgery to remove organs is a pretty good bargain (which includes preoperative bloodwork, anesthesia, IV catheter and fluids, monitoring, an overnight stay at the hospital, and pain medication to go home and in the hospital). Cats and smaller dogs are less. And my clinic is the expensive one that does not skimp on pain meds, anesthesia protocols, etc.

You sound very bitter about veterinarians as well as think you are entitled to quite a bit. Pets are a luxury and not a right and if you can't afford to take care of them maybe you should not have one. Vets go to school for many years and will never make as much money as their human counterparts. I have $80,000 of student loans from going to vet school (4 years undergrad, 4 years of vet school, and a year internship) that will be paid off when I am 58 years old. Many of my clients who bitch about fees like you are live in a nicer neighborhood and drive a nicer, newer car than I do. My older dog was sick last year and I personally spent about $2000 on her, and she now takes about $150 worth of medication per month. My younger dog was a rescue that was dumped after being run over by a car last year that I spent $1000 and did 3 surgeries on her to save her leg. The owner was surprised when I told her (at the time she was signing the puppy over to me) I would either keep her or find a new home for her, not return her to the original owner who was so eager to get that free euthanasia and could not even pay the exam fee (I kept her). Why do people think veterinarians OWE THEM SOMETHING? You would never speak to your human doctor that way, and I know I treat my patients and clients with more compassion than I get when I go to the doctor.

As for your complaint that the emergency clinic is 30 minutes away? Well why the hell would anyone build one near your house with your attitude about vet medicine? If everyone in your town thinks the same way, you're damn lucky one can operate in your area at all! Emergency clinics usually must service the clientele of 30 or so regular practices to financially keep the doors open. We aren't like human hospitals that get government funding to keep the doors open. We must operate like a business and make enough money to cover our costs.

Sorry for the rant but the ignorance and entitlement displayed in that post irritated the crap out of me. I just worked an 80 hour week (all at NIGHT), and I have to listen to crap like that all the time. Then again some of my clients send me Xmas cards with pictures of their pets that I have helped and it makes it all worth it. I am going to go knit something. Anyone wonder why I love to knit? Being an ER vet is stressful. The last client who screamed at me at 4 AM that I was a money grubbing bitch walked out without paying for the exam fee, refused the medication I offered her because she didn't want to pay $25 for antibiotics for her rat's pneumonia, and slammed into her new Mercedes (she was about 27 years old) and peeled out of the parking lot. She also complained she had to drive 45 minutes to see me (she actually passed another E clinic on the way but I didn't tell her that). My guess is that without medication her pet rat died. All because I am a money grubbing bitch that wants to get paid for the hard, often thankless work that I do. I need to stay off the off topic board. It is just depressing!

Becky Morgan
12-21-2008, 08:08 PM
Gee, thanks for the support. I have done animal rescue literally all my adult life. I worked my way through college before I became disabled. I can't get Social Security disability because I fell through the gap between coverage under my father's account and having enough credit of my own. I drive a 14-year-old economy car with a muffler held together by prayers, and I'm glad to have it. Gas money is a definite plus. If I weren't married, with a husband who does have health insurance even though his lousy job could pay a whole lot better, I would have no medical care myself. There is no Mercedes in my driveway. There is never going to BE a luxury anything here. I am not 27 and healthy. I am 50 and living on borrowed time. There would be no pets here if people didn't dump all their sick animals out here in the country "where they can run"--meaning they can't stand to see them die and don't want to pay. that means the local vets have absorbed pretty much every cent I ever had to spare.

As for my lying about Pumpkin's death, I had an itemized copy of the bill because they asked me to explain some of the mystifying items on it. No one at Friendship Heights had time to talk to them at any point during the proces. Yes, they have a rotating vet staff, and no one expects a vet to be up 24/7. The problem was that no two staff members seemed to be reading the chart or able to answer questions, before or after his death. It doesn't look as if they duplicated anything, which was my first thought; when I've helped people go through their own medical bills, we often find doctors have accidentally ordered repeat CT scans or other expensive tests. Yes, their standard fee is $400 to see the pet. The oncologist phone consult (she didn't actually see the cat) was $400. There were smaller charges, like $50 for cage cleaning since he stayed overnight, a couple of hundred dollars for the overnight stay, etc. IV fluids were another separate charge and actually weren't much more than they'd be here.

They paid by credit card, of course, since that vet, like most, does not accept Care Credit. The closest one to us is a three-hour drive to a major city. That's a long way to go with a sick animal who could be treated or at least stabilized before a further move. If my college education wasn't much use as a career, it did get me a discount card for OSU MedVet. Even so, that's expensive, but the care has been worthwhile most of the time (our neighbors had a bad experience, but thankfully it was the only one we've heard of.)

As for the vets who run the emergency clinic, they started it because no one wanted to be on call every night any more. Farm vets are supposed to be immune to needing sleep, near as we can figure, but it made much more sense for all of them to pick a spot, open an office and take turns sleeping there one night every two weeks. We're never sure who will be there, but since there's only one local vet I really don't trust, it isn't that much of a gamble.

As for vets giving a discount, volume usually counts for something. Between my neighbors and me, we are...heheh...large consumers of our vet's services. I don't know how many strays we've taken in for basic workups and spay/neuter this year, but we have three more neighborhood cats who need to go in after Christmas. Dot's dear little ancient Chihuahua was on enough meds to support all of us. I don't know what she paid this year, but it's a bunch, especially for a widow getting ready to retire. No matter--Betsy got her care, and Dot doesn't care about a nice car either. (Oh...and she's still paying off her daughters' tuition bills, and I'm trying to find part-time sit-down work to put my son into college because he can't find a full-time job, so cry me a river about that, too.) We obviously hate animals and are cheap.

Nope, sorry, I stand by every word I said, and you can call me a liar or anything else hideous you care to. I've had it all thrown at me before.

laikabear
12-21-2008, 08:16 PM
Why don't you post a copy of the invoice so we can all see it? I stand by what I said, too.

laikabear
12-21-2008, 08:38 PM
Actually, don't bother. Who cares what it cost? It costs what it costs. You wouldn't haggle over the price of medical care with your doctor and you wouldn't haggle over the price of a flat screen TV or your groceries or pretty much anything else. Just vets are supposed to love animals and therefore work for free. Does your accountant do your taxes for free because they love taxes? Does your plumber fix your toilet for free because he loves toilets?

Why would anyone get a volume discount? Does your pediatrician give you a volume discount because you had 5 kids? I don't think so. These are LIVING CREATURES, not something you are buying at freaking CostCo. It doesn't cost your vet any less to spay 5 cats you bring in than it does 1 cat. Remember how we said that spay/ neuter and vaccines are loss leaders? If all you ever bring in is rescues for those procedures, your vet is losing money EVERY TIME YOU COME IN. Why not let them choose when and where to do charity work (as most of us do gracious plenty for GRATEFUL and truly poor people) and not force your agenda down their throat/ bash them online.

Why am I trying to reason with someone who clearly thinks the world owes her something? Just because you are "rescuing" animals or are disabled STILL does not mean that any vet should be a slave to your agenda or that you are entitled to anything. I am sorry your friend had a bad experience at the specialist but that doesn't give you license to dump on vets everywhere. I am done with this thread.

Debbie
12-21-2008, 08:44 PM
:verysad:

cheley
12-21-2008, 09:08 PM
:oops: Yikes...I am the one who suggested giving Princessbonniejane some advice..It wasn't any invitation/discussion about Vet Medicine/Costs...that topic should have never been started here...I feel that was totally unneccessary...Thank you laikabear for your advice to princessbonniejane...

princessbonniejane
12-21-2008, 09:44 PM
When I said it's $200 I meant that's how much it was just for the vet to come in, not including the blood work. I am sorry if I caused anything, I didn't mean for you guys to get upset I just wanted a little bit of advice. PS. she's doing better we are going to take her to the vet tomorrow.

frostywolf
12-21-2008, 11:18 PM
Veterinary medicine:

I know that the most expensive dog to own when considering veterinary costs is an English Bulldog, yet many owners spend their last dime on the $2000 purchase price and can't afford adequate healthcare. The English Bulldog is a "lemon" - don't get one unless you like spending money at the vet.



Those and Chinese Shar-Pei's! The two breeds I would never, ever own.

----------------

Here's mine. Job 1 (Bank Teller)
*Everyone needs to reconcile their account to their statement every month. You instantly lose credibility, willingness to waive an overdraft fee etc., when you admit you've never balanced your checkbook, but you just can't understand how you bounced a check.
*(USA)Debit cards run through store systems using your PIN are processed in a completely different way than when you sign off like a MC/VISA. This affects time it takes for payment to clear, holds placed and bank fees (usually).
*Check floats have been almost eliminated. You can no longer write a check assuming that you will have the money in two days, before the check clears. Checks nowadays can clear electronically by the next day!

Job 2 (Veterinary Hospital - kennel, tech asst.)
*Asking if we may take your dog "in the back" is not some code-speak for, "We are secretly going to torture/beat/abuse your pet." Some pets really do behave better away from the owners, believe it or not.
*When I have to do a nail trim on your horribly frightened/strong/aggressive/wiggly dog, please be aware that there is a chance I may quick the dog. I do NOT do this on purpose, believe me. That only makes it harder the next time the nails need to be trimmed, and nobody wants that.
*When you board your pet, don't bring every blanket/bed/toy that the pet has. Chances are, most will never make it in with your pet anyway.

Job 3 (Obedience Trainer working towards certification)
*Most training of the dog does NOT take place in the classes. Classes are for teaching the owners HOW to train. We can tell when you don't practice with your dog outside of class.
*Training is much more effective if you keep it fun for both you and the dog. Training sessions should NOT be just boring repetition. Fun and games are the order of the day.
*Physical and mental exercise should both be daily requirements for any dog.
*Physical corrections (collar pops, electronic collar shocks etc.) need to be so precisely timed to work well, that for the average owner, positive reinforcement works much, much better.

cheley
12-21-2008, 11:38 PM
When I said it's $200 I meant that's how much it was just for the vet to come in, not including the blood work. I am sorry if I caused anything, I didn't mean for you guys to get upset I just wanted a little bit of advice. PS. she's doing better we are going to take her to the vet tomorrow. I am glad "she" is doing better..Please let (me) know what was the cause of her distress...Chemicals, toxic plants, illness etc.. I am only very curious because I too own two very precious felines...and my very best friend "lost one" due to (human ignorance) she was given an "Easter Lily" which turned out to be one of the most toxic plants to cats...needless to say, she lost a beloved "indoor cat"...

frostywolf
12-21-2008, 11:54 PM
While I think laikabear is overreacting to what Becky originally posted, I do understand what she is trying to say.

Unfortunately, what laikabear refers to is an all-too common reaction from the public regarding veterinary medicine. People are so used to the way human health-care systems work, that they don't realize that vet medicine does not work the same way. And it is very frustrating.

I'm not going to get specifically into either post, but here is some food for thought.

Overhead at a vet clinic is extraordinarily high. There are no gov't subsidies or help like human hospitals would have. Veterinarians go to school just as long as MDs. But by the end of it all, a general practitioner MD is responsible for knowing all the workings of one species. A veterinarian is responsible for knowing all (okay, exaggerated a little, but to make a point) of the rest of them.

I understand laika's defensiveness, though I do think she read a bit too much into Becky's original post.

HollyP
12-22-2008, 01:05 AM
I now know that you have to pierce the inner foil seal of a tube of caulk. The seal is between the nozzle and the caulk( not at the other end like I thought:teehee:). An old wire hanger unbent is a great tool to do this.

I also know you can get great deals on paint at most places if you look for their oops/mistake paint. Sometimes you can find the perfect color and finish for around $5 a gallon.

A great way to save on your heating bill is to close the vents and shut the doors in rooms you don't use.

I also just learned from my mom that if you wear a CPAP and it is making a lot of noise in the tubes you have probably put too much water in the humidifier part. The extra water is caught in the tube.

Another thing I've learned about CPAPs is if you are not comfortable in your mask their are many, many different kinds of mask. Talk to your Dr. and they can help you find one that works for you.

Becky Morgan
12-22-2008, 01:14 AM
Back to the thread topic (even if this will hint at why the accusations hit a nerve)...
What I know from going through nursing school and from being a volunteer advocate for my own parents, my neighbors, their doctors (lawsuit prevention) and random folks who need advice but can't pay for it:
1. Your doctor wants you to get well. However, s/he is not psychic and doesn't always remember what is on your chart, which looks just like the other 4,999 she is responsible for. Nothing you tell her is likely to be new, let alone shocking, and detail may save your life. (This goes double for your pets, who can't speak up and mention that they were licking the garage floor right after you changed antifreeze.) Keep a list of your medications, significant surgeries, etc. at hand. Many fire departments hand out cards to keep on your refrigerator or vials to put inside. You'd be surprised how helpful that is. I am convinced that most lawsuits start not because of malice but because somebody forgot to mention something important, then got mad when things went south.

2. If you are sick, but nothing is broken, you're not bleeding buckets and you don't have chest pain or stroke symptoms, call your doctor before you run to ER. If you have a chronic condition, take a minute during a regular checkup to ask "What should make me call you? When should I go straight to ER instead?" If you're a caregiver, ask the person's doctor those questions. Avoid ER if possible. For one thing, your health insurance, if you have any, will probably make you pay for some of an ER visit it thinks "unnecessary". For another, you'll be seen by a doctor who may never have seen you before. For a third, you will be sneezed on by every kid with a cold in four counties, and they in turn will pick up anything infectious that you have. Most annoying life events, like minor sprains, a stitch or two or "Doc, did I break this toe or only sprain it?" can be taken care of not only more economically, but way more efficiently in a doctor's office or the urgent care place. Using an ER for a sore throat is like having a NASCAR pit crew fly in from Charlotte to rotate your tires in the driveway, except that you'll be sitting around four or five hours longer.

3. Make copies of your med and condition list, because if you go to the ER, you'll need one for the triage nurse, one for the floor in case you're admitted, and one to keep on hand so you can remember what you take when. If you are allergic to a medication, for goodness' sake wear your bracelet or necklace and don't let any well-meaning soul try to help you take it off. Your doctor may not remember that you can't take Demerol or that you are violently allergic to aspirin. People who are or may become unable to communicate need to carry their history with them one way or another in case they and their caregivers are separated.

4. If you have health insurance, you'll get a patient handbook about this time of year. Read through it! You need to know which ERs, urgent care centers, and doctors you can use (especially if your doctor is covered and his partner isn't...been there, done that.) You may also be pleasantly surprised. One year, out of the blue, our insurance decided to cover part of chiropractic care if our primary care MD ordered it. My husband tried it, got great results and saved the insurance's prescription plan several hundred dollars in pain meds. We also noticed that the major vision care places accept our insurance card as a discount and that they will buy over the counter medications that used to be prescription if we submit a physician's order (this saves everyone a ton of money and aggravation.) If we hadn't read the book, we wouldn't have noticed!

5. If you know your parent, neighbor, spouse, etc. has trouble dealing with the doctor because of confusion, ask to go along. Doctors shouldn't throw you out of an exam room if the patient wants you there unless there is a very good reason. Make sure you're on the patient's forms as a person with whom it is okay to discuss his or her condition; there may come a time when you're the only voice they'll have. No doctor wants to guess what the patient might want when he could know.

6. Health care power of attorney or advance directive, good. Having discussed them with your family, priceless! All three of us have organ donor stickers on our licenses and we've all talked about our wishes with one another. If you think it's horrid to have that conversation now, it's far worse to be sitting in ER at night with our friend Maria saying "Have you ever talked about what she would want?...Has she ever told you how she felt about organ donation?" Make sure EVERYONE who might have to make the call understands what you do or don't want.

7. If you can't afford your medicine, speak up. Even if your doctor has to prescribe something less effective, it's better than going without. Most majjor drug companies have some kind of discount program for those who must have a certain brand name. Most people can use generics unless the material used as inert filler doesn't agree with them. Also, remember that your insurance company may have preferred manufacturers. If the Expensimed salesman has been in your doctor's office to leave samples, he may think of prescribing that. If your insurance won't help with it, have the pharmacist call. A simple "Say, Doc, Healthmed won't cover Expensimed, but they cover a good generic and they'll also pay for Spenditol, which is the same thing made by Otherdrugco." Not taking your medicine can kill you, so speak up. If you're caring for an older or confused person, make sure you ask how they're doing with their medicines.

8. Offer to lay out medications for your parents if they can't handle the bottles, have trouble seeing which is which, etc. A pillbox with seven days set up in four doses can be a real help.

9. Use the same pharmacy for your meds if possible. If you buy long-term meds in bulk, as most insurance companies want you to, make sure your regular pharmacy knows what you're taking that way. This is especially important if you have to use multiple doctors. One of my friends passed out with low blood pressure because her cardiologist, internist and primary MD had all prescribed the same blood pressure medication in two different brands plus a generic. She filled the prescriptions at a pharmacy near each doctor's office and obediently took them all with no idea she was getting a triple dose.

10. This is the hardest one, because it's an intangible: if something feels weird, speak up. If Mom seems more confused than normal, if you don't remember having that rash before you started the new refill on your prescription, if you tried that exercise and now your ankle really hurts...call. Remember #1: your doctor isn't psychic, but she wants you to get well, keep using her office, and bring in your friends because she's so good.

cheley
12-22-2008, 09:32 AM
While I think laikabear is overreacting to what Becky originally posted, I do understand what she is trying to say.

Unfortunately, what laikabear refers to is an all-too common reaction from the public regarding veterinary medicine. People are so used to the way human health-care systems work, that they don't realize that vet medicine does not work the same way. And it is very frustrating.

I'm not going to get specifically into either post, but here is some food for thought.

Overhead at a vet clinic is extraordinarily high. There are no gov't subsidies or help like human hospitals would have. Veterinarians go to school just as long as MDs. But by the end of it all, a general practitioner MD is responsible for knowing all the workings of one species. A veterinarian is responsible for knowing all (okay, exaggerated a little, but to make a point) of the rest of them.

I understand laika's defensiveness, though I do think she read a bit too much into Becky's original post. I would never underestimate my Vet..(he is our animal Doctor) nor would I take a personal jab at one "online", yes we all (pet owners) have experienced "emergencies", high cost etc...but they are like our children and we do what we have to do. I have never considered the "cost" (in my case cash) that I have spent. :grphug: Hopefully Laikabear will continue to post threads as I love looking at (her/his) avatar...

Crycket
12-22-2008, 03:17 PM
I thought of another one...

A lot of tickets (theatre/concert) are thermo printed.

It is not a good idea to leave them on a hot dash board, or other such things...such as microwave, iron or bake them (you are likely laughing, but it HAS happened!)

robkat317
12-22-2008, 03:44 PM
I know that I can't read as fast as post on this thread come up!!

I also know, as a certifiied scuba diver, that the tanks on our backs, mostly, contain compressed air, not oxygen.

mks22300
12-22-2008, 09:06 PM
I know that winter driving in Western New York is horrible!