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View Full Version : All handcrafters who make things for anyone under the age of 12, you will be affected


InterNette
01-07-2009, 02:25 PM
I guess this is a great place to post this since the subject was brought up, but this is more serious than people realize. If you knit or sew or make anything for kids under 12 this can affect you. Simplicity at heart and old fashion goodness seems to always loose out.
http://www.handmadetoyalliance.org/Home

Show your support and help change the laws to make sense. Shutting down a stay at home moms handmade craft business because of imported china goods is just plain wrong. How about we pass laws for imported chinese goods?

Two sides to this issue, this woman supplimenting family income will be put out of business.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vWsrv...eature=related

ON CPSIA site there is a petition and also sample letter you can use to send to your congressman.

KnitTogether
01-07-2009, 03:04 PM
I am curious (if you know), does this apply if you make something for a child under 12 and give it as a Christmas gift, birthday gift, etc. (where no money is exchanging hands), or would these rules also apply to gift giving??

Thanks,

saracidaltendencies
01-07-2009, 03:15 PM
That's a really good question...And what about charity giving? Would makers of handmade items no longer be able to knit, etc. for charity in this situation?

Craw
01-07-2009, 03:34 PM
Supposedly it WILL affect charities. I wrote to Project Linus asking about this and they said they weren't sure what was going on but they hired lawyers to sort it out and they will be posting any information on their website. You got me whether they will close their doors, or give only to teens and adults, or if they can find some way out. Either way it seems crazy. If they continue to give to children in need, that means that it's ok for poor kids to get [potentially] sick from untested bedding or other handmade items but for people who can afford to buy it, well, they're safe. The other alternative is that babies and children just do without because it's not safe to accept the donations. Pretty screwed up if you ask me!

I don't think it applies to handmade gifts. Even if it did, there's no way to control something like that. It's sure not going to change my gift-giving.

Jan in CA
01-07-2009, 03:43 PM
It won't affect my gift giving, but I have done quite a bit for charity and this worries me some. What may happen is that more of us knit for charities out of the country like Afghans for Afghans. I understand the need to control these things, but really to ban it all outright is just wrong.

Jan in CA
01-07-2009, 03:58 PM
I was searching for stories on this and came across this info. It's something at least and I'm sure more will be coming out as the days go by.
http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lead7-2009jan07,0,6917858.story

saracidaltendencies
01-07-2009, 04:09 PM
Yeah, I don't know if they fully realized (or even realized at all) how this law will effect people. From the big chain stores, down to the people like us. They're definitely going to have to re-think this law.

Craw
01-07-2009, 04:27 PM
Thanks for that article Jan. In it it said:

The commission's two members (a third seat is vacant) voted tentatively to exempt:

* Clothing, toys and other goods made of natural materials such as cotton and wood;


That's better than what they had first said! I would think most charity work is done in acrylic. Cotton is ok but not as cuddly soft and warm as some of the acrylics. Wool is out. I sure ain't making a $50+ baby blanket and donating it. What I'd like to see is to have the yarn companies test their own products (the acrylics) and if it contains lead or phthalates to clean it up and get it out. I don't want this stuff in my yarn regardless of whether I give it to a baby or not. Yarn companies, however, say no way are they taking on the testing. They don't make baby items, they make yarn. WE make baby items. :shrug:

Jan in CA
01-07-2009, 04:56 PM
I know it doesn't say it, but isn't wool considered natural? :??

saracidaltendencies
01-07-2009, 06:39 PM
I know it doesn't say it, but isn't wool considered natural? :??


In the other post link, the article does state:

"There is the possibility of a partial reprieve. The Consumer Product Safety Commission, which is responsible for enforcing the law, on Monday will consider exempting clothing and toys made of natural materials such as wool or wood. The commission does not have the authority to change the law but can decide how to interpret it."

So I assume wool would be ok? Unless it has since been stated otherwise...

MAmaDawn
01-07-2009, 06:55 PM
I know it doesn't say it, but isn't wool considered natural? :??

I'm not sure if you were replying to Craw's post about wool being out, but I think she meant because of the cost of making a blanket to be donated... but also most hospitals don't want wool. But I'm hoping that blankets will be covered in "clothing"

InterNette
01-07-2009, 07:06 PM
I hope the changes come soon, Feb 10th is looming and this law is so wrong for the small crafter. Help out and write your representatives. I give away nearly everything I make but I had hopes to sell on ETSY one day my baby and kids quilts. Not according to this law.

http://www.etsy.com/view_listing.php?ref=sr_list_1&listing_id=19446657

thepurplegg
01-07-2009, 07:31 PM
So, does this mean that your everyday garage sale will be illegal? Lots and lots of people buy baby stuff second-hand.

Jan in CA
01-07-2009, 08:38 PM
I'm not sure if you were replying to Craw's post about wool being out, but I think she meant because of the cost of making a blanket to be donated... but also most hospitals don't want wool. But I'm hoping that blankets will be covered in "clothing"

I was just referring to the fact that they said -

"The commission's two members (a third seat is vacant) voted tentatively to exempt:

* Clothing, toys and other goods made of natural materials such as cotton and wood;"

...and I feel that wool should be considered natural, too. I've made wool kid sweaters and hats for charity.

miccisue
01-08-2009, 08:59 AM
JMHO, but I don't think limiting it to "natural" fibers, etc. is going to cut it.

Face it, there are a lot of us who knit with acrylics (and, referring to thrift shops and yard sales, how many of those clothes for kids are made from synthetics or a mix of cotton and synthetic, etc.?) and are going to continue to do so. Especially when we're talking about kids....easy care is the #1 consideration for most folks, and tossing something in the washing machine and dryer - well, can't get much easier than that. Some people can't tolerate wool.

To me, this isn't sufficient until they also exempt acrylics.

aztec_judy
01-08-2009, 10:44 AM
This is a lot over the top......This law will concern anyone or place that sells handmade items dor kids!!!!!!!


I think government is getting too involved now. I understand why this got started, but doesn't it seem a bit extreme?

http://www.digitaljournal.com/article/264507

THIS WAS SENT TO ME IN AN EMAIL ... PLEASE READ !!!!

Jan in CA
01-08-2009, 01:31 PM
Oh I agree with you miccisue. I use a lot of acrylics, too. I can see where acrylics might be a problem though since they are man made. What they need to do is rewrite this stupid law so it doesn't put people out of business and lets manufacturing catch up to code in the meantime.

I just feel that at least they are taking some steps and if they allow some fibers then we can at least still do some knitting for charities because I don't want my hard work to end up in a landfill.

Craw
01-08-2009, 03:24 PM
Lookie what I found! They have already made some changes.
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601103&sid=a0Xr2Iw1Vi_8&refer=us
Wool and cotton are exempt. Now they need to address acrylics or places like Project Linus will still be in trouble. Many people can't afford to work with anything other than the inexpensive acrylics for donatiions. I know I can't. The cheap cotton I can get isn't suitable for blankets, hats, or booties but it makes a neato potholder. Babies don't need potholders! :teehee:

Jan in CA
01-08-2009, 03:36 PM
That's good. It's a start and I'm sure with more complaints they'll find more they can exempt. I kind of doubt acrylics will fall into that category since man made products like that have a higher chance of having lead. Let's home manufacturers of products like acrylic will change the way the do things so that it can be used, too. :thumbsup:

Crycket
01-08-2009, 07:12 PM
They don't make baby items, they make yarn. WE make baby items. :shrug:

That doesn't make a whole lot of sense....they technically do make baby items...rather...this is my point...

I believe they discontinued Patons Twister because little kids were chocking on some of the fuzzies on it...that did make a difference...yes? They have just as much responsibility IMO...just because it is THEIR product...go figure....

luvmykid28
01-09-2009, 10:19 AM
Here is the latest information I recieved via email this morning:

WASHINGTON, D.C. - In February 2009, new requirements of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) take effect. Manufacturers, importers and retailers are expected to comply with the new Congressionally-mandated laws. Beginning February 10, 2009, children’s products cannot be sold if they contain more than 600 parts per million (ppm) total lead. Certain children’s products manufactured on or after February 10, 2009 cannot be sold if they contain more than 0.1% of certain specific phthalates or if they fail to meet new mandatory standards for toys.

Under the new law, children’s products with more than 600 ppm total lead cannot lawfully be sold in the United States on or after February 10, 2009, even if they were manufactured before that date. The total lead limit drops to 300 ppm on August 14, 2009.

The new law requires that domestic manufacturers and importers certify that children’s products made after February 10 meet all the new safety standards and the lead ban. Sellers of used children’s products, such as thrift stores and consignment stores, are not required to certify that those products meet the new lead limits, phthalates standard or new toy standards.

The new safety law does not require resellers to test children’s products in inventory for compliance with the lead limit before they are sold. However, resellers cannot sell children’s products that exceed the lead limit and therefore should avoid products that are likely to have lead content, unless they have testing or other information to indicate the products being sold have less than the new limit. Those resellers that do sell products in violation of the new limits could face civil and/or criminal penalties.

When the CPSIA was signed into law on August 14, 2008, it became unlawful to sell recalled products. All resellers should check the
Here is the latest infomation I recieved this morning from the CPSC website via email.. It looks like resellers and thrift stores are not to worry about this new law. It only affects manufacturers retailers of new childrens clothes and toys.

CPSC Web site (www.cpsc.gov) for information on recalled products before taking into inventory or selling a product. The selling of recalled products also could carry civil and/or criminal penalties.

While CPSC expects every company to comply fully with the new laws resellers should pay special attention to certain product categories. Among these are recalled children’s products, particularly cribs and play yards; children’s products that may contain lead, such as children’s jewelry and painted wooden or metal toys; flimsily made toys that are easily breakable into small parts; toys that lack the required age warnings; and dolls and stuffed toys that have buttons, eyes, noses or other small parts that are not securely fastened and could present a choking hazard for young children.

Craw
01-09-2009, 10:53 AM
I agree Crycket. The yarn companies should be held accountable for their product(s). If they're putting questionable chemicals into yarn then they need to clean up their act, regardless of whether or not it's going to a child. If I had the $$$ I'd do a test myself on some of the major yarn companies' acrylics and see just what's in them. I might be pleasantly surprised, then again, I might flip out!

Jan in CA
01-09-2009, 12:35 PM
There is a slew of articles on this now and it looks like used products in thrift stores will be okay, but the sellers should check the website for products likely to contain lead. From what I read that means charities will be okay, too. Since manufactures have to follow new rules that means that yarns will eventually not be an issue no matter what type they are.

saracidaltendencies
01-09-2009, 11:20 PM
heh...ok, this answers the question I just posted in the other thread :teehee:

mathwizard
01-16-2009, 05:04 PM
If I read this correctly, if you make something and it can be used by a child 12 yrs. or younger it will have to be tested if you plan on selling it. It won't affect anything for adults or children older than 12.

OffJumpsJack
01-16-2009, 05:32 PM
I suggest taking this to the "Off Topic Discussions" area as there is an existing thread there (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=87491).

--Jack

Shandeh
01-17-2009, 08:31 AM
.......Wool and cotton are exempt. Now they need to address acrylics or places like Project Linus will still be in trouble.

I don't think this is an issue for charities to worry about. They are not selling anything. It's being DONATED.

"Beginning February 10, 2009, children’s products cannot be sold if they contain more than 600 parts per million (ppm) total lead."

"When the CPSIA was signed into law on August 14, 2008, it became unlawful to sell recalled products."

"CPSC Web site (www.cpsc.gov (http://www.cpsc.gov)) for information on recalled products before taking into inventory or selling a product. The selling of recalled products also could carry civil and/or criminal penalties."

sabrinasmom
01-27-2009, 10:35 PM
I know there has been a lot of discussion about this new law. I work for a company who manufactures wool socks in kids sizes and this product has not been exempt from this new law. The cpsc has a video of their 1/22/09 meeting discussing textiles , cottons and acrylics including yarns. Coats and Clark was there talking about yarns at Hobby Lobby, JoAnns,Michaels,WalMart. It is a really long video but explains why textiles should be exempt. One of the speakers who is a professor actually dyes for those historic settings-like things used to be done. Here's the site (couldn't get the link icon to work)

http://www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/cpsia.html[/URL]

Sewing Angel
02-04-2009, 03:11 PM
Ok I found this article posted on another group
http://www.latimes.com/features/health/la-fi-consumer-lead31-2009jan31,0,7179159.story

It looks like we have a little more time before it goes into effect.
I hope they figure out that handcrafters would NEVER be able to do what they asked.
I make children's hooded bath towels and manage to eek out a small profit.