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Woodi
04-03-2009, 05:50 PM
is making handmade soap from lovely edible oils, lye and water....I enjoy adding scent, sometimes using essential oils, sometimes the synthetic "fragrances" (which are more fun and actually sell better than the eo's). I have been selling my bars locally for 7 years now, and still enjoy it.

Aaaanyhow, today I made a 15-bar batch of soap and scented it with a new fragrance I just bought, called "Grape", which smells like those deep purply-blue grapes they sell each fall. The ones with the sour skins, and the grape pulp pops into your mouth whole, seeds and all - know those ones?

anyhow, I colored the oils a deep purply blue with oxide powders, just gorgeous. BUT when I stirred in the fragrance, the entire batch turned a dark green! Yoiks!!!?

Now my dilemma is: "what to name my 'purple grape soap'?...

'Green Grape that smells purple'?
'Purple grapes that turned green with envy' ?
Green grapes that smell purple?

all suggestions as to what to name this will be much appreciated.

Jan in CA
04-03-2009, 06:03 PM
:think: The middle one seems the most likely of that group, but I'm think it's awfully long. What about just "green with envy" and then if you have a description you can explain why.

Woodi
04-04-2009, 09:08 AM
HAHA, I like 'green with envy'.....or maybe "envious green grape"?

I remember what these blue grapes are called: Concord grapes.

anyway, a soaping friend suggested I wait naming it for a few weeks and see if the color morphs into something else, hopefully not brown though!

Other suggestions I got from friends are:
Grapes of Wrath

Sour Grapes
Grape Expectations

Fox Grapes or Vinifera or Labrusca

Green Grape Granada
Teal Fruit?
Juicy

Grapes
Concord Green

MoniDew
04-04-2009, 10:28 AM
Great suggestions here.

I just wanted to say that I've ALWAYS wanted to learn soap-making. SO creative! My fear of lye is the only think keeping me from plunging full-speed-ahead into a new hobby.

I hope you sell your handmade soaps online somewhere! I know I'd love to try a bar now and again. (especially if they are all-natural, etc. I'm a nature girl.)

Hmm...have you ever thought about scenting your soaps with tiny flecks of green tea...? My teas use 100% natural essential oils as their "natural flavoring". Bet some of them would make stunning soaps.

OH, now you've done it! I'm gonna have to try this myself! (do you teach soap-making, by any chance?)

cindycactus
04-04-2009, 06:23 PM
I can remember my mother on her knees scrubbing the kitchen floor with lye soap and a brush. Didn't smell so good!!! Yours sound lovely. And all the great names to go with them. Wonderful.

Woodi
04-06-2009, 03:13 PM
Monidew, your teas sound perfect for soaps, if you flavour them with eo's!
Do you sell the teas?

and yes, I do teach soapmaking, to anyone who asks. I have had a number of private one-on-one students in my home workshop, as well as a few small classes. But if you're in OK, it's awfully far to come for a lesson. I'm sure there are soapmakers closer to you whom you can contact.

I learned from a book: " Soapmakers Companion" by Susan Miller Cavitch.
It did take me 6 months of reading and understanding to get the courage to work with lye, and then I did my first batch outdoors, using the BBQ burner to melt the hard oils (I use olive, palm, palm kernel or coconut). It's best to use a combination of soft and hard oils to get good soap qualities.

I word long sleeves, goggles, a breathing mask and rubber boots....to insure that I didn't burn myself, as the lye is indeed very caustic. Now I work in my laundry room in normal clothes, don't always wear rubber gloves (but maintain a breathing mask, cuz those lye fumes began to burn my lungs after many months of soapmaking).

It's not that scary, really......and a whole lot of fun.

MoniDew
04-13-2009, 02:11 PM
Monidew, your teas sound perfect for soaps, if you flavour them with eo's!
Do you sell the teas?

Oh, yes! Follow the link in my siggy to get to the teas!

and yes, I do teach soapmaking, to anyone who asks. I have had a number of private one-on-one students in my home workshop, as well as a few small classes. But if you're in OK, it's awfully far to come for a lesson. I'm sure there are soapmakers closer to you whom you can contact.

I'll try to locate a few local ones. And I'll also try to PM you about this topic, too.

I learned from a book: " Soapmakers Companion" by Susan Miller Cavitch.
It did take me 6 months of reading and understanding to get the courage to work with lye, and then I did my first batch outdoors, using the BBQ burner to melt the hard oils (I use olive, palm, palm kernel or coconut). It's best to use a combination of soft and hard oils to get good soap qualities.

I've read that and several other books on soapmaking, but it's taking me much longer than 6 months to work up the courage! (about 5 years, now, of wanting to, and worried to, back and forth)

I word long sleeves, goggles, a breathing mask and rubber boots....to insure that I didn't burn myself, as the lye is indeed very caustic. Now I work in my laundry room in normal clothes, don't always wear rubber gloves (but maintain a breathing mask, cuz those lye fumes began to burn my lungs after many months of soapmaking).

It's not that scary, really......and a whole lot of fun.

I'd probably be in an environmental suit inside a plastic bubble! You are my hero. I would really still like to learn, though.