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MrsWildchild
04-26-2009, 11:48 AM
I was just reading another post from a knitter in Australia whose pattern referred to the left "pin." And it made me think of the fact that all around the world, english-speaking people use different english words to refer to different objects. It also reminds me of that when I watch my daughter's favourite TV channels, because a lot of them are made by people in England, Australia, etc.

I live on the far eastern side of Canada, which means the ancestry here is primarily European (United Kingdom). Because of this, Newfoundlanders often use terms from that area that other Canadians aren't always familiar with. Some examples:

- the "bonnet" of a car (the hood)
- "beanie" (toque)

There are tons more, but of course I can't think of them now, perhaps others have some.

It's also the reason sometimes I will write "color," and sometimes "colour." Although the accepted spelling, all across Canada is "colour."

Crycket
04-26-2009, 11:54 AM
I am a huge Harry Potter fan...and I absoletly love some of the terms they use...

I love "ruddy" and "brilliant" etc...

I also recently took to listening to the Chronicals of Narnia BBC production again...and it is all there too...LOVE IT...

Yeah..the spelling thing bugs me to...I am used to Colour and Theatre, honour and fibre...

And even though I have switched all my computer programs to use Canadian english...it still tells me I am misspelling these words...*sigh*

Jan in CA
04-26-2009, 01:19 PM
I've always found the different terms and spellings interesting. It makes it hard to understand what someone is saying occasionally, but a few questions usually clears that up. :teehee:

Just remember - there is no one right way... they are all just different. :thumbsup:

sgtpam
04-26-2009, 01:37 PM
I think it would be fun to continue driving this thread along the winding road and across the globe:cool:

I'll start with asking this...:???:

what is a left "pin" :?? :whoosh:

suzeeq
04-26-2009, 02:34 PM
"Pin" is an older word for needle. As in knitting pins.

MoniDew
04-26-2009, 02:39 PM
YES! I love to hear the flow of language as it is spoken/written/read.
As a United States-ion, I there are quite a few British terms that I absolutely love:

bumbershoot (umbrella)
bubbler (drinking fountain)
lift (elevator)
flat (apartment)
Bobby (cop, policeman)
Governor (Boss, Chief)
knickers (underwear, panties)
loo (restroom)
mates (friends)
bangers and mash (sausages and mashed potatoes)
bubble and squeak (cabbage stew)
Bob's your uncle (voilą! there you have it!)
bugger (a universal swear word)
gob-smacked (amazed)
knackered (worn out)
quid (a UK dollar/pound)
row (rhymes with cow - argument)
shag/shagging (having sex)
sixes and sevens (not up to par, in disarray)
wanker (jerk)

and, to answer your question, pin (needle)

MrsWildchild
04-26-2009, 03:16 PM
row (rhymes with cow - argument)

Funny. Yep, we use that one here in Newfoundland, too.

ArtLady1981
04-27-2009, 01:17 AM
In the King James Bible, the word SHAMBLES is used at 1Co 10:25

"Everything that is sold in a shambles keep eating, making no inquiry on account of YOUR conscience..."

Do you know where we were?

The MEAT MARKET!

:teehee: Now that's goin' back a few years!

Newer translations have updated 'shambles' to read 'meat market'!

OffJumpsJack
04-27-2009, 03:10 PM
Well, from Harry Potter discussions, I've learned that

Pants (UK) are underwear/briefs/panties (US) (Peeves was making students burn their "pants" before letting them pass him)

Pudding (UK) dessert (US)

Spotted D-i-c-k (UK) is a dessert and not a curse or swearing.

Biscuit (UK) is a cookie (US)

Pancakes are not the same thing among (UK US and France)

Knocked up (UK) is a wake-up call (US)

Rubber (UK) is eraser (US)

struggleknit
04-27-2009, 06:06 PM
Well, from Harry Potter discussions, I've learned that

Pants (UK) are underwear/briefs/panties (US) (Peeves was making students burn their "pants" before letting them pass him)




"Pants" is also used to describe something that is not good in the UK. For example "I went to the concert and it was pants"

ladyamesindy
04-27-2009, 06:33 PM
All this talk takes me back to when I was in college studying in Paris, France. I met my best friend there (a Brit) who used to tease me about my "American slang" - meaning my everyday language! We used to tease each other quite a bit - she kept calling my sweaters "jumpers", and I kept calling her "dresses" jumpers!

Anyway, I don't know whatever happened to it, but for Christmas I ended up with and English-American dictionary! We had a lot of laughs over that one!!!

:roflhard:

OffJumpsJack
04-28-2009, 09:08 AM
. . . ( U K ) . . . . . . . . . . ( U S )

Lorry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Truck
Articulated Lorry .. . . . . . Truck/Big-rig/Semi
tichy ??. . . . . . . . . . . . . Small ? . . . . (another from Harry Potter)
Fringe . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bangs
Boot . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Trunk

*Edit for additions.

Luvmyrottnboy
04-28-2009, 09:21 AM
Love this thread! My South African friends and family have a few:

"just now" = later. "I will wash the dishes just now"

"now-now" = soon. "See you now-now"

"Serviette" = napkin

"shame" = cute, adorable, funny OR a shame. Upon seeing a cute pup "Oh, shame!"


They have a word for sneakers too but it escapes me at the moment

MoniDew
04-28-2009, 11:04 AM
oh, those South African phrases are sweet! I'll bet that's a whole new language - being, in part, an amalgamation with some of the native languages.

Simply_Renee
04-28-2009, 11:31 AM
Knocked up (UK) is a wake-up call (US)



(sigh) too true! :teehee:

I have heard of most of the UK ones- although bumbershoot was something I didn't know.

Simply_Renee
04-28-2009, 11:33 AM
Love this thread! My South African friends and family have a few:

"just now" = later. "I will wash the dishes just now"



OK I am totally using this one & will use it as an argument if needed.

Thanks for sharing- I have never heard of any of them (not knowing anyone in or from South Africa!) That's really neat.