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imrachel
07-14-2009, 07:54 AM
On another thread, I have expressed how baffled I am that anyone thinks that walking and knitting should ever be done at the same time, how dangerous this can be for the walker and anyone within 10 feet of them. Now, this story did turn out to be beneficial for this knitter, but still-- a knitting needle through the heart. Does anyone need anymore proof that you should not be moving while you knit?! http://abcnews.go.com/2020/story?id=8071664&page=1

suzeeq
07-14-2009, 09:16 AM
Uhhh, that's not a common occurrence. I've successfully knit while walking many times and had no mishaps.

margz3
07-14-2009, 09:53 AM
Well, from that story, I don't think she was actually knitting while she was walking, but walking into her friend's house for her knitting group while carrying her supplies!

I was carrying the bag with the two needles in my right hand ... and tripped on the first step and sort of fell on my chest, on her porch

suzeeq
07-14-2009, 10:07 AM
That's not quite the same thing, then...

Lisa R.
07-14-2009, 10:42 AM
For myself, I rarely make decisions based on improbable "mights" and "coulds."

People are killed in automobile accidents every day, and there's nothing to say it can't happen to me...but I still drive.

I'm not advocating walking and knitting particularly (though I've done it on rare occasion, browsing through a gift shop, as a matter of fact). But just like anything else, with proper precautions, there's no reason it can't be done.

And if one takes your reasoning to its logical conclusion, one shouldn't go to a knitting group, either, since one might trip and fall, thus impaling one's heart with a knitting needle.

I'm not trying to convince you to change your views, of course...just sharing that there are more ways than one to look at the situation.

Jan in CA
07-14-2009, 11:06 AM
That's awful, but it was a freak accident. I have never heard of someone being hurt while walking and knitting before. :shrug:

Craw
07-14-2009, 11:13 AM
And if one takes your reasoning to its logical conclusion, one shouldn't go to a knitting group, either, since one might trip and fall, thus impaling one's heart with a knitting needle.


Exactly what I was thinking. If I were to dwell on it further, the same accident could happen right at home while carrying my project or bag across a room... It's safer to just never knit at all???

cacunn
07-14-2009, 11:59 AM
The problem was not that she had knitting needles it was that she was walking. If she had been crawing to the knitting group ther would not have been a problem.

No seriously, this was a freak accident, true, but we should all be aware of the number of sharp objects we deal with daily. With this awareness should also come a little care. If we have a knitting bag we carry with us often do we have a way of covering needle points or sissor points, etc.

ArtLady1981
07-14-2009, 12:00 PM
Our gentleman friend was taking a nap one summer's day.
He arose a few hours later, and called out for his wife.
No answer. "Well, she must be out in the garden."
He got on his shoes, walked out to the garden path.
His wife had stumbled on the path stones while carrying some
freshly cut flowers up to the house. Her cutting shears had
pierced her heart. She had bled to death in her garden while he napped.

True story.

Carrying ANYTHING sharp while walking can result in a horrible accident, regardless of your age.

Jan in CA
07-14-2009, 03:30 PM
OMG Dollyce, that's horrible! :shock:

imrachel
07-14-2009, 05:26 PM
I just got off the phone with a friend of mine who owns an LYS and told her about the ABC News story and this thread. She sounded shocked and said that whenever she sees someone walking around and knitting in her shop, she asks them to stop and have a seat. She said that at one of the Stitches conventions a few years ago, an announcement came over the loud speakers asking anyone knitting as they walked around from booth to booth, to please stop for everyoneís safety.
I guess there are people who participate on this site who will not be seated when knitting. I guess you may be the same people who donít wear seatbelts on occasion because the odds are that you will not be in an accident in which they will prove beneficial. I guess you may also allow your child to walk around and knit. As Iíve said before, if you want to do this when you are completely on your own, there is no one within 100 feet of you, then fine. But you have sharp objects in your hands. This is not about a difference of opinion. Sharp objects can injure. Fact. I really hope that all of you who insist that this is an acceptable practice never have to find out consequences.
And please donít do it near me. Thank you.

Debkcs
07-15-2009, 02:48 AM
I worked in ED's for years (interspersed with everything else) and never saw anyone with a knitting needle anywhere in their torso. We did have one gentleman who died like Dollyce's friend, right in front of his grandkids. This one was right outside Seattle also.

Wish I was good enough at knitting to be able to walk and knit, but still wouldn't do it, too safety conscious.

Craw
07-15-2009, 10:06 AM
I guess you may be the same people who donít wear seatbelts on occasion because the odds are that you will not be in an accident in which they will prove beneficial. I guess you may also allow your child to walk around and knit.

When you can't stick to a topic and instead grope for insults, you cheapen the discussion and weaken your point.

My child is autistic and will never be able to knit. Thank you.

melmac51
07-15-2009, 02:06 PM
Amazing article! You never know when a freak accident will save your life.

Dollyce, my heart goes out to your friend.

imrachel
07-15-2009, 10:05 PM
Craw, I'm very sorry that your child is autistic. I'm sure every day is a challenge for you and him or her. However, I don't understand what that has to do with walking and knitting. My comment about children is very much on topic and not about insulting anyone. My point is that if you wouldn't let your child, autistic or not, walk around with knitting needles-- and I pray no one would ever do that-- then no adult should either. It was completely on topic, as was my comment about seatbelts. There are statements on this thread about accidents with knitting needles being freak incidents, people have done it a lot with no problems. I'm sure there are people who never wear seatbelts and have never been in a serious accident. That should never be a promotion for not wearing seatbelts. There was also a comment implying that the desire to walk around while knitting is a matter of a different point of view, opinion if you will. Knitting needles are sharp and dangerous if you're moving around while using them. You shouldn't be knitting and walking around, just as you shouldn't be cutting paper and walking around.
As I have said, if you are completely on your own, that's your business. But one person here said she knitted while browsing in a gift shop; now you're involving other people's safety, perhaps mine. If I were ever in a public situation, say that gift shop, and saw someone knitting, I would ask the manager to ask that person to stop and put their needles away. If the only way you can possibly relax, or it somehow is sanity-saving for you, is to knit and walk simultaneously, then I guess go out in a field where no one else will possible cross your path and go for it. But other than that, this is a very, very bad idea.

This site is about helping each other with their knitting. I would include that to mean helping each other be safe. Anyone who encourages another knitter to walk and knit is akin to posting on a cooking site that you don't bother watching what you're doing while cutting with a sharp knife, and suggesting that others do likewise. Yes, the chances are great that we will never be injured by knitting needles. But these things do happen, and why in the name of all that is holy would we ever take an unnecessary chance with something like this?

Jan in CA
07-15-2009, 11:33 PM
Everyone has a different opinion on just about any topic you can think of. We need to be mindful of that and not assume that because someone doesn't share our beliefs that they are wrong. Let's be careful not to point fingers and be understanding. :hug:

saracidaltendencies
07-16-2009, 12:18 AM
Wow, harsh and presumptuous words about the walking knitters not wearing seatbelts and allowing their kids to walk and knit, ie: irresponsible.

The fact of the matter is life is dangerous. Just about everything you do could result in some freak accident...And, the lady in this article wasn't even knitting while she was walking, her needles were in her bag.

To put in perspective, washing, drying, and putting away kitchen knives could be dangerous, a child in a classroom carrying his or her freshly sharpened pencil back to their seat could be dangerous, crossing a street could be dangerous, flying, driving, taking a train, eating, drinking, catching a cold, etc. is potentially dangerous.

The solution is common sense; using common sense to take the necessary precautions to lessen the chance of your actions/activities harming you or anyone else.

Any one of us could pick up our knitting needles, begin to walk over to the couch to sit down to knit but end up tripping and falling, being stabbed by our needles.

The solution is common sense. Use point protectors and never have the tip of the needle pointed towards you while holding them and moving.

I mean this argument could go so far...Knitting while a passenger in a car could be dangerous as well. Say you have a bit of a fender bender...Maybe the accident didn't cause much damage, but let's say, for some freak reason, the accident was enough to cause you to stab yourself with your knitting needles.

Life is a risk, plain and simple. It's all about using common sense and taking the necessary precautions to decrease the likelihood of your actions causing harm to yourself or others.

cacunn
07-16-2009, 09:22 AM
Wow, harsh and presumptuous words about the walking knitters not wearing seatbelts and allowing their kids to walk and knit, ie: irresponsible.

As I read and reread the original post it appeared to me the writer was using overstatement trying to make a point. I took that point to be that some people are not considerate of others. Some are not considerate because they knit in public and could injure others with the needles, others are not considerate because they talk loudly on cell phone in public place and disturb others, others are not considerate because they talk on cell phones while driving and this list could go on and on and on.

This is a public forum with many different people from different countries and different regions in the same country. How we use words are different. Let's not be presumptuous and assume that what we just read was what was meant by the writer. If you find some thing that you find harsh or take offense to stop a second and then reread the entire post. Did the writer overstate something to try to add emphasis? Do we know where the writer is from and do the words have the same meaning in their region as they do in ours?

Please read every post through the eyes of love and assume that they were written in a loving way. In addition be careful out there.

Mike
07-16-2009, 09:58 PM
I mean this argument could go so far...Knitting while a passenger in a car could be dangerous as well. Say you have a bit of a fender bender...Maybe the accident didn't cause much damage, but let's say, for some freak reason, the accident was enough to cause you to stab yourself with your knitting needles.

Knitting in a modern car would very likely be bad in a minor accident because if the airbag doesn't ram the needles through you it will ram them through itself puncturing itself and spraying everything with sodium azide.
Search it and read all about it.

But I agree. The original article wasn't about knitting while walking, it was about carrying needles in a bag, something I bet imrachel does all the time without care to her safety or the safety of those around her.

Babies wrapped in acrylic bursting into flames. Knitting needles poking people 100 yards away. I'm amazed people even continue this outdated dangerous hobby.
"I want the original Knit Picks Options 200 stitch cable model knitting needles with cable stops in the case and this thing that tells time."
"You'll poke your eye out, kid."

Crycket
07-17-2009, 12:06 AM
The solution is common sense; using common sense to take the necessary precautions to lessen the chance of your actions/activities harming you or anyone else.



I was once talking to an ambulance worker who was telling me about how frustraiting his job could be...

I said to him "yeah...you must see some strange things, most accidents are preventable"

He said "ALL accidents are preventable"

This convo happened a long time ago (couple years now) and I am not sure how we got talking about it...and I am sure, as I was working at the time, it didn't go much further...but I would have loved to have continued it.

Some might argue it, but when thought about...A lot (if not all) accidents are preventable...but to what end I guess...there has to be room for human error...;)

Plantgoddess+
07-17-2009, 09:06 AM
An interesting discussion about hazards. My hubby is an industrial safety instructor and spends most of his working time teaching various classes around the US on safety and hazmat etc. Being aware of the risks helps and trying to find safer alternatives is better, but human nature being what it is we all perform unsafe actions throughout our day with little thought. You couldn't accomplish as much if you did things in the safest manner possible. I have injured myself many times over the years and learned not to throw the steak knives into the sink of soapy water to wash. Look where the branches on the fruit tree are before standing up. Look to see where I left my knitting before sitting down. Watch where I'm walking. Don't walk around my horses bare foot. That being said I do take my knitting with me when I know I'll have to wait for something like car repairs, but I don't have protectors for my dpns and conceivably I could fall on my cloth bag and stab myself with the needles, especially since I took 2 different socks I'm working on.

cacunn
07-17-2009, 09:25 AM
I watch the USGS earthquake map (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsus/) fairly regularly and based on the frequency of earthquakes in Southern California I believe knitting should be banned south of San Francisco! What would happen if you were at home, sitting in you favorite chair and the BIG ONE hits? You could be stabbed by your knitting as dive for cover. But wait, if you have your knitting you could have something to do while awaiting rescue. I see that I am on the horns of a dilemma:??

Jan in CA
07-17-2009, 11:29 AM
I live in southern California. Believe, 99% of the earthquakes are never felt so it's no big deal. :lol:

shifio
07-17-2009, 12:15 PM
i have enough problems keeping one foot in front of the other with knitting aswell i would damage myself i know i would :wink:

sandy57th
07-17-2009, 12:26 PM
I have been lurking on this site for a few months now. This may not be the best first post, but I think this is important enough to share. It sounds as if people are pretty hot under the collar over this issue of ďwalking and knittingĒ and I donít want to stir things up any more than they already are but I really have to say this. I was very surprised to read the 2 threads about this. Some people have said they were insulted by what was said and I donít want to insult anyone but Iím afraid I have to say that itís kind of shocking to me that anyone would knit and walk at the same time. I am a kind of intermediate knitter who has a scar on her upper arm. . .from when my sister and I were out walking and she was knitting and looking where she was going, but my ankle just did one of those funny collapse on its side things, and I fell into her and her needle went into my arm. I didnít fall that hard, but knitting needles have sharp ends and it went in about an inch. It was pretty horrible. When I went to the emergency room to have it removed the doctor said, ďI canít believe this, this is the second knitting needle Iíve pulled out from someone this week. DonĎt you people realize youĎre dealing with pointy objects?Ē It seems his other patient had walked to the phone to answer it and kept knitting and had tripped and the knitting needle had gone into the roof of her mouth, narrowly missing her brain. The good part of the story is that I didnít give up on knitting and neither did my sister! From reading all the posts, Iíd say about half of you are ready to make no knitting and walking a law and the others think not doing it is silly. Some people are talking about walking and knitting and some are just saying that weird accidents can happen at any time even if youíre just sitting there. All jokes aside about earth quakes, from my own experience I can tell you that I wouldnít dream of walking and knitting and I think the comments about how you could injure other people should be taken very seriously.

suzeeq
07-17-2009, 01:00 PM
Ya know, you make a good point, but I've heard of knitters who sat on their needles and one got stuck you know where. So yeah, accidents will happen, even just sitting.

cacunn
07-17-2009, 03:10 PM
I have been lurking on this site for a few months now. This may not be the best first post, . . .

Sandy I think this is a excellent first post. :cheering: :woot:

I see this forum as a sharing of idea and knowledge. But in sharing we should honor different opinion and not instantly find fault or offense at what someone else said. My comments about SCal was to try and jokingly point out that we can not cover every possible action or result (no offense taken or even perceived). We must be careful and think, we can not eliminate every possible threat to our selves or others.

This weekend my wife and I are going to separate craft functions function and then meet up spend the night in a hotel as a mini-get away. Since I will be finished before my wife and before I can check into the hotel I was going to stop be one of the local book store. Books and magazine to get out, coffee to drink, pastries to sample and comfortable chair to sit an wait in. While waiting I may also knit (while seated). However, my question is, based on some of the comments made here is - should I be knitting even while sitting?

What if someone walking by trips and gets stabbed by my needles, what if one of the parent is letting their young child run wild in the store and the child runs into my needles, etc.? There a large number of thing that could happen that I have no control over, at what point should I stop knitting because something may happen even though I take every precaution possible?

There are extremes on both sides of any issue, where is the happy middle or is there a happy middle?

Simply_Renee
07-17-2009, 06:01 PM
"You'll poke your eye out, kid."

This made me have a "Christmas Story" moment. :teehee:

TooCircular
07-18-2009, 01:30 PM
For what it's worth, about 2-3 months ago on my way to a friend's house where we meet once a week for knitting, I took a very bad fall on her front porch while carrying a tote bag with all my knitting supplies in it. I guess I just didn't raise my foot up high enough to clear the top step. Everything went into slow motion. I tried to control the fall, but had no control over it at all. My head smashed into her front door and I'm pretty sure I landed on top of my knitting bag. Ended up with black and blue skinned knees, but that's all, thank God. She heard a noise at the front door and thought that the wind had caught the door, but instead found me and some of my knitting stuff splayed across her porch. What really got to me was how I had absolutely no control over the fall at all. The slo-mo thing was pretty weird too.

Just thought I'd share.

Jan

Knitting_Guy
07-19-2009, 06:10 PM
Many, many people choke to death each year while eating. Everyone stop eating!!!!!!!!!!


Seriously, come on already. I think if a person is too uncoordinated to walk and knit (or chew gum) they know it. I've actually seen someone trip and fall and be injured by a ball point pen in his shirt pocket. Should everyone stop carrying ball point pens?

Many women suffer back injuries every year due to carrying a heavy purse, yet women still carry them.

There is no such thing as a zero risk world and never will be.

Eekee
07-19-2009, 07:24 PM
Common sense is the key. I knit while waiting in lines, and that sometimes involves some walking. I've knit at customs at the airport, and in the voting line. I don't think I'm a risk to people around me. If you see me as a risk, find another line.

I carry my bag with me frequently, and supposed I could be injured by it, should I fall. But, I'm going to live my life according to what I'm comfortable with. If you want to walk and knit, you do it knowing the risks. If you are offended or frightened by a walking knitter, distance yourself.

Knitting_Guy
07-19-2009, 09:58 PM
Common sense is the key. I knit while waiting in lines, and that sometimes involves some walking. I've knit at customs at the airport, and in the voting line. I don't think I'm a risk to people around me. If you see me as a risk, find another line.

I carry my bag with me frequently, and supposed I could be injured by it, should I fall. But, I'm going to live my life according to what I'm comfortable with. If you want to walk and knit, you do it knowing the risks. If you are offended or frightened by a walking knitter, distance yourself.

Come on now! Common sense? In this day and age? How old fashioned!

:rofl:

OffJumpsJack
07-20-2009, 04:00 PM
I guess there are people who participate on this site who will not be seated when knitting. I guess you may be the same people who don’t wear seatbelts on occasion because the odds are that you will not be in an accident in which they will prove beneficial. I guess you may also allow your child to walk around and knit. As I’ve said before, if you want to do this when you are completely on your own, there is no one within 100 feet of you, then fine. But you have sharp objects in your hands. This is not about a difference of opinion. Sharp objects can injure. Fact. I really hope that all of you who insist that this is an acceptable practice never have to find out consequences.
And please don’t do it near me. Thank you.
:nails:

Should one equate knitting while walking as equally dangerous as ...
a) using a cell phone while driving? (talking or texting)
b) not wearing a seat belt while in a moving car? (driver or passenger)
c) walking while reading a book?

Which is more likely to cause one's death? Eating a hot dog or walking under a large object suspended by a rope? Well it depends on what happens more often, a child eating a hot dog and choking or a rope breaking when someone is passing under the heavy object.

Most adults would recognize the danger of a frayed rope holding a heavy object but not as many recognize a hot dog (or pop corn) as a choking hazard for children.

One poster said if you want to knit and walk go out to the middle of a field where no one else will encounter you. She or he must have very, VERY long knitting needles! :oo: I mean a field is a big area to reserve just so one person can knit. :roll:

Part of what we teach young cub scouts before letting them earn a whittling chip (which enables them to carry and use a pocket knife on scout camping outings) is to check their safety circle (how far they can reach with the empty hand that will hold the knife). They must show they know and understand this idea and deliberately check the area for anyone or thing inside this safety area before they start and all while they use the pocket knife.

One might say that straight needles should be banned because they are longer than three inches (7.6 cm) and could pierce a vital organ if they are jabbed in the body. So, all you knitter only use circulars with very short tips, yes? (note: The author thinks this paragraph is an exaggerated example and that it does not use sound logic.)

Are all accidents preventable, yes but if the cost or the probability of the injury is small and the cost or inconvenience of prevention is large then it is not worth it to try and prevent the risk.

That is one usage of common sense. But have you noticed that "common" sense seems to be less and less common?

Did you know that one can be impaled by a tooth brush? They are long and are often in or near soft tissue areas (mouth, face, and neck). Never walk with a tooth brush in your mouth or hand. (Note: The author believes this paragraph is not an exaggerated example and that it does use sound reasoning.)

I think there is greater risk to me from other drivers talking on cell phones than from someone walking a few feet away from me while either they or I knit. I perceive the risk (probability of occurrence of injury) is very small for walking and knitting but very high for using a cell phone and driving.

Cars move fast and are very heavy, they are lethal weapons and require a license to operate. When you operate a car, it requires all your attention and you will interact with many more people (other car/drivers) in a short period of time.

Knitting does not require a license. When you knit and walk you will not be near other people very often. And the needles are in your hands and pointed away from you.

One is more likely to be injured in a fall if one tries to stop their fall by reaching out with one or both arms. Tuck up into a ball. Cover your head or tuck it to your chin in a roll if you are falling head first.

I have sailed over the handle bars of my bicycle more than once. I never broke my neck because I tucked into a ball and rolled. I was taught how to tuck and roll as a child. Did anyone know this was a life saving skill? Perhaps my parents did. Certainly my scout leaders knew how this skill could be used to protect someone when falling.

I once fell while on a ladder. The bottom of the ladder slid out. That happened too quickly for me to react in any meaningful way to protect my head, but I was blessed. I only landed on my legs and buttocks so was only badly bruised.

I always wear my seat belt when in a car (even if I am only moving it within my driveway). I do not let my children walk with a tooth brush in his or her mouth. I would not prevent myself or others from knitting while walking and I would not assume that the above poster (who erroneously guessed I would sometimes not wear a seat belt) always keeps her knitting needles locked in a gun safe to prevent injury.

Exaggeration is not sound reasoning and neither is jumping to a conclusion based on limited facts or observations. Any Zero Tolerance policy is likely to lead to absurd results because nothing is absolute. I would find it absurd and unjustified if my child was expelled from school for simply having a pair of knitting needles in his or her possession because knitting needles could be used as a weapon.

One must evaluate risk of injury based on probability of occurrence of injury. One story of sever injury (or even ten) does not indicate a significant risk over a large population. Here the population size is unknown (how many people walk and knit or carry knitting needles while walking) but can be presumed to be quite large.

Remember: "A mind is a terrible thing to wast."
:doh:
I say a mind is not a terrible thing but neither should it [a mind] be wasted. I think they mean to say, "to waste a mind is a terrible thing."

A hand guns does not kill people! Left on their own a hand guns just sits there. It takes a person to use a hand gun and that person makes a decisions on how to use that weapon.

A pen or pencil (or keyboard) does not make spelling errors. It is simply used by a person who makes a poor decision based on lack of knowledge or an inability to apply that knowledge. (I though keyboard should be added to the list of writing implements, for ample reasons.)

Remember: A panda eats, shoots, and leaves but that does not make them a pulp-fiction killer. Proper grammar and punctuation counts. :doh:

suzeeq
07-20-2009, 05:49 PM
One poster said if you want to knit and walk go out to the middle of a field where no one else will encounter you.

You can still trip over a gopher hole and stab yourself....

Basically, use common sense and care, knit when and where you feel like and respect other's actions to do differently.

pinksugar
07-21-2009, 12:51 AM
this makes me wonder. What about knitting in cars and buses? more or less dangerous than walking and knitting? if the driver unexpectedly slammed on the brake it could mean a needle through the eye or something!

I'm not a good enough knitting to be wandering around and working at the same time, just like I'm not a good enough knitter to watch television and knit, but I do knit on public transport...

Like some others have posted, anything can be dangerous really!

cacunn
07-21-2009, 12:59 PM
this makes me wonder. What about knitting in cars and buses? more or less dangerous than walking and knitting? if the driver unexpectedly slammed on the brake it could mean a needle through the eye or something!

The more I think about this the more I have been wondering. If I order HOT coffee (proper brewing temperature is reportedly around 195 degrees) and burn myself after I spill the HOT coffee I can sue the vendor of the coffee. Can I sue the manufacture and LYS that sold me the knitting needle when I stab myself while walking and knitting? I don't remember and warning on any knitting needle about the knitting needle be sharp and pointy and that I could stab myself by knitting while;

walking
riding in a car
riding in a bus
riding a horse
during an earthquake
in a air plane
etc.I can see the infomercial now. "Have you been stabbed while knitting? Call the law offices of Purl, Cable and Yarn Over for a free consultation. Call today."

suzeeq
07-21-2009, 06:47 PM
Call the law offices of Purl, Cable and Yarn Over for a free consultation.

:chair:

LizzieK8
07-22-2009, 08:23 AM
A waist is a terrible thing to mind and mind is a terrible thing to waste.

I'm not sure I can buy into all accidents can be avoided. I have no control over the actions of others, and as, happened to me, I was driving across a four lane road with the light and someone hidden behind trucks ran the light and broadsided me. I can think of no way to avoid that other than holding up traffic and inching across, which would piss someone else off who would speed up and possibly do something reckless.

Life is life and one can be reasonable in the attempt to keep themselves and their loved ones safe and sound, but to live in a state of fear will end your life faster from stress related disease than walking and knitting would....

Just my two cents....gotta go, going walking with my BFF and have to finish up the socks.... ;)

pinksugar
07-22-2009, 09:21 AM
LOL.

You guys made me laugh :D

I think that infomercial sounds like a winner!

Lieuvena
07-22-2009, 11:41 AM
Well, I've been reading this thread and avoiding posting, then I remembered this is Knitting Help and people here don't chew you up and eat you for breakfast for disagreeing, so here it goes.

I completely agree with the OP. It just seems an unnecessary risk. This accidents will happen anyway mind set, just doesn't work for me.

Car accidents happen. We still take safety precautions and wear seat belts and look for the best safety features in our cars. We don't say accidents will happen anyway so why bother.

People will break in to others houses. We still take safety precautions and lock our doors and buy alarm systems. We don't say why bother and leave things hanging open.

Kids will fall off bikes. We make them wear helmets as a safety precaution.

People going for walks will fall, trip, be attacked by others or even get hit by cars (dramatic, I know, but read the news, it happens somewhere daily). We should still take safety precautions by paying attention.

If someone is going for a walk and they see someone coming their way driving like an idiot then they can go, "look, there's an idiot, I better move" If you aren't paying attention because you are knitting or otherwise preoccupied, you may not see them coming. Likewise, you may have seen the hole you fell in, or the shady character coming your way, etc.

I agree with the pp who said common sense is key. Safety precautions are common sense. To me paying attention while you go out for a walk is a safety precaution.

Mike
07-22-2009, 03:00 PM
Car accidents happen. We still take safety precautions and wear seat belts and look for the best safety features in our cars. We don't say accidents will happen anyway so why bother.
I have an '84 Isuzu P'up that is so basic it should be painted white with the word "truck" on the side.
I had Jeep that the seatbelts rusted from the floor so I tied them to the seats.
My '67 VW Bus screamed "let's go flying through the windshield".
So I guess it's OK for me to walk while knitting? :p

Kids will fall off bikes. We make them wear helmets as a safety precaution.
That's rather new. I bet the majority on this forum didn't wear bike helmets and survived.
My worst concussion was caused by the helmet (in fact it was my only motorcycle hospitalization requiring a long stay).
I got rid of my street bike when it looked like we were going to get a helmet law because I've experienced the harm they can cause.
My uncle scraped his head down to brain so I also know the harm not having one can cause.

We don't need safety police telling us what to do. The laws of self-preservation dictate people will do what they deem safe for themselves.

Plantgoddess+
07-22-2009, 03:29 PM
I have to agree with Mike about the history of hazard observance. I wonder if families were so large so that if you lost a few kids you still had plenty left. I grew up with a father who thought it was fun to tie sleds to the back of the car and pull us through the snow covered streets. We picked ourselves up out of more than one snowbank when he cornered to fast and flipped us off the sleds. There are too many incidents to remember of things that would get him jailed today, but weren't that unusual when I was growing up.
Mom used to leave us kids in the car while she did the shopping rather than try to keep track of 3-5 kids in the stores. There have been cases locally in the last decade of people being arrested for leaving their children in cars unattended.
Times change and we get more fear oriented I think partially because of the immediacy of news from around the world making us think that life is scarier now than ever.
Just my opinion for what it's worth.

suzeeq
07-22-2009, 04:08 PM
i tend to agree with you. Helmets for kids doing any kind of sport has mostly sprung up in the last 10 years. I sometimes think that may be more of a hindrance, masking being able to hear hazards. My mom left my brother and I in the car while shopping sometimes, though we were maybe 10 or so. Most times I'd rather sit in the car and read than wander through the grocery store with her.

The human race has survived for centuries through even more dangerous times than we have today, so while it can be tragic to lose someone you know, or who's close to you, stressing about the possiblity of what might go wrong can actually harm your health just as much.

figaro
07-22-2009, 04:30 PM
I have been reading this thread and not really felt the need to comment until I read this one. I tend to think stuff will happen to people, heck I have fallen down my stairs and got hurt even when holding the railing. As far as seatbelts, helmets for kids on bikes and adults on motorcyles, those are required by law (I know helmets are not required in all states) so those are a no brainer. All of my kids grew up with a seat belt, period. Now my older brother also road a motorcycle and a helmet, until the day when someone in a car pulled out in front of him and he went flying over the hood. He ended up in traction for days and a permanent pin in his leg along with a limp...but his head was okay because of a helmet. And he does not ride a motorcycle anymore...

Anarfea
07-22-2009, 05:06 PM
I could very easily have died this weekend. I wa picnicking with my boyfriend and a storm came up out of nowhere and blew over a tree big enought I couldn't have wrapped my arms around it. I landed about 4 feet from us. I wanted to sit in the spot where the tree landed but my boyfriend vetoed it because he said the grass was thicker where we ended up.

I also sometimes knit in the park where we picnicked, though I didn't knit that day. But I'm not going to stop knitting outdoors because I might not see a tree about to fall on me if I'm concentrating on a K3tog.

Life entails risks.