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-   -   Benefits to learning continental knitting? (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=102373)

TrueIconoclast 01-04-2011 09:18 PM

Benefits to learning continental knitting?
 
I am an English knitter, but I've been thinking of learning continental knitting as well. But before I invest my time in learning something new, I have to ask, what are the benefits to continental knitting over English knitting? And vice versa? Is it good to know both, or is it more for novelty?

Also, I know I've been posting a lot of threads and asking a lot of questions. I hope I haven't been over-doing it. (P.S. - I also ran a search through the forums to see if anyone had posted this before me, I didn't find any recent ones, but I'm sorry if this question is redundant.)

Jan in CA 01-04-2011 09:46 PM

There are tons of posts about english vs continental. They both equally good and it's good to know both for things like stranded knitting. Some people claim continental is faster and it may be for some, but I've seen english knitters knit like the wind, too. Do what works for you.

CoolWool 01-04-2011 11:40 PM

No worries...
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by TrueIconoclast (Post 1310449)


Also, I know I've been posting a lot of threads and asking a lot of questions. I hope I haven't been over-doing it. (P.S. - I also ran a search through the forums to see if anyone had posted this before me, I didn't find any recent ones, but I'm sorry if this question is redundant.)

Never apologize for posting new threads, Silly! It's a forum. GO FOR IT. Besides, it gives me new posts to read. :wink:

I do English and have no desire to learn the other method. I can't think of how it would be beneficial to just confuse myself further. ha But if you're curious, give it a shot. You can always change your mind later, and go back to the RIGHT WAY. heh heh J/K

knitcindy 01-05-2011 10:43 AM

I know how to do both methods. I enjoy using Continental for 90% of my projects and it works GREAT. However, I use the English way when I'm teaching someone new to knit AND when I'm using plush or chenille type yarns.

Those types of yarns are harder (for me) to use in my left hand because they don't move as smoothly through my fingers.

I would NEVER say one way is "right" or "wrong" or better than another way. It all depends on what each individual is comfortable with. If you're at all curious about it, go ahead and investigate it. Try it out for about 2-3 weeks. If it works, GREAT. If not, go back to English.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained!!!!!
knitcindy

Jeremy 01-05-2011 11:59 AM

I have taught Continental to people with repetitive motion problems who have pain with English style. There is more economy of motion in Continental and less wear and tear on the wrists.

TrueIconoclast 01-05-2011 04:11 PM

I think I'll officially learn (or at least try) the Continental method, at least to see if it's easier. I don't get pain in my wrists from English method, but who's to say that won't happen later on down the road?

Thanks everyone! :)

trvvn5 01-06-2011 10:15 AM

I switched from English to Continental and I must say that I like it a lot better. I think its realy good to know how to do both though.

crazykntter83 01-06-2011 11:22 PM

I've always used the continental method, before I even knew what it was. For me, it just flows a lot better. I really don't know why, it just does. Just give it a try whenever you feel like you'd be comfortable trying it, and if it works for you that's great. If not, just go back to the method that is most comfortable for you.

TrueIconoclast 01-06-2011 11:40 PM

I concur
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by crazykntter83 (Post 1310788)
For me, it just flows a lot better. I really don't know why, it just does.

That's actually why I wanted to try the continental method - the videos I watched on KH seemed like the knitting was going a lot quicker, with fewer "finger acrobatics", and with less motion. It drives my boyfriend crazy when I knit in bed at night when he's trying to sleep; he says that when I really start to get into it the bed shakes like there's an earthquake from me throwing the yarn (I think that's what it's called - when I wrap the yarn around my right needle) lol. Continental method just seems more fluid, and maybe also easier on the joints. I never get joint pain (I'm 20), but I want to lessen the damage as much as possible so that I don't have to give up knitting when I get older from arthritis.

crazykntter83 01-07-2011 02:37 AM

Well, it sounds like you should really give continetal knitting a try. With continental, you basically just let the needle do all of the work for you. To me, it's just what makes the most sense. It just seems odd to me to have the yarn in the same hand that you're holding you're knitting needle. But that's just me. :)


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