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melinda9723 06-16-2012 05:43 PM

Re-learning to knit...help
 
I taught myself to knit a few years ago and recently discovered I have been knitting the wrong way all these years! :noway:
So now I am extra paranoid that the few things I have knitted in the past will fall apart in the washing machine! :oo:
To try to keep it short, lets just that when I knitted, my stitches were not twisted like they are suppose to be.( I was knitting through the back loop,half,of the stitch on my needle).
So today, I am trying to learn the correct way to knit. I use to knit continental style but I am having a very hard time completing a stitch with that method now so I am going to try another method to see if that helps.
Does this even sound logical or should I just give away my knitting needles and stick to crochet? :???:
Thanks for any advice,tips and all feedback!

Ingrid 06-16-2012 06:31 PM

I knit "English" or "throw" style and can get it done pretty quickly. You can try whichever method you're most comfortable with. There is no correct way.

If you were knitting through the wrong leg of the loop, it just twists the stitch--nothing will fall apart, so you don't have to worry about that.

Watch the videos, take your time, and it will come.

suzeeq 06-16-2012 06:35 PM

You can still continue to wrap the stitches the same, way, just knit or purl into the leg closest to the tip of the needle and the sts won't be twisted. Or you can try english style with the needle in your R hand.

Jan in CA 06-16-2012 06:42 PM

All knitting through the back loop does IS twist the stitch. It's often done intentionally as a decorative stitch and sometimes it's done to tighten a stitch. As long as the stitch is removed properly the knitting won't fall apart. There is a method called 'combination knitting' that some people do in which you knit through the back loop (ktbl) and you untwist the knit on the other side by wrapping the purl under instead of over.

It's good to know the standard method of knitting though, it makes following patterns easier. It doesn't matter one bit whether you continental or English. They both work and both can be fast. It's also handy to know.

melinda9723 06-16-2012 06:59 PM

Thanks! I have been watching the videos here trying to follow along. My tension seems to be a problem also. Is there a video here for that too? Maybe I over looked it.

suzeeq 06-16-2012 07:02 PM

Quote:

There is a method called 'combination knitting' that some people do in which you knit through the back loop (ktbl) and you untwist the knit on the other side by wrapping the purl under instead of over.
You've got the cart before the horse a little... the backward purl wrap is the reason they have to tbl to keep them untwisted. Many of them run into trouble when they learn to knit and try to knit through the front loop, not realizing they wrap the yarn the other way on the purls.

melinda9723 06-16-2012 07:43 PM

learning to knit is harder for me than I thought it would be!
But I will learn the correct way once it registers with my brain! :lol:
Maybe I will try to find an easy pattern to learn with.
I was making dishclothes but couldn't figure out how to make an eyelet now that I am knitting correctly.

suzeeq 06-16-2012 07:58 PM

An eyelet is a yo and a dec which can be either k2tog or ssk. The yo is just a wrap around the needle and doesn't include knitting a stitch.

melinda9723 06-16-2012 08:00 PM

I got stuck when it came to which way to wrap the yarn. When I wrap as if I was going to knit the correct way, I ended up with a very large hole, not a small one like before.

Jan in CA 06-16-2012 09:59 PM

Are you talking about the YO? To YO on the knit side you bring the yarn forward between the needles. Then you'll put back over the right needle and knit the next stitch normally. It's supposed to leave a hole or eyelet.

To purl you wrap the yarn over the top of the needle from the right and around.

Here's a little more help. Sometimes it's easier to look at a few different explanations and then it will click. The first link has a good picture.
http://bellaceti.blogspot.com/2009/0...l-english.html
http://www.knitpicks.com/tutorials/P...glish__D8.html


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