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-   -   Help, don't want to frog back! (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=113690)

lnzoma 07-08-2013 10:58 PM

Help, don't want to frog back!
 
1 Attachment(s)
Okay. I am attempting to knit this Guernsey Wrap from a chart. I'm a beginner and have dropped (and possibly wrongfully tried to pick up) stitches. This looks awful! Can anyone look at the attached pic and offer any insight?

I'm so Frustrated!

claireweber 07-09-2013 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by lnzoma (Post 1380924)
Okay. I am attempting to knit this Guernsey Wrap from a chart. I'm a beginner and have dropped (and possibly wrongfully tried to pick up) stitches. This looks awful! Can anyone look at the attached pic and offer any insight?

I'm so Frustrated!



It's really frustrating to end up with a mess, and I would think it to be near impossible to tell from your photo what the problem is. That is a really good shot of your work, though :wink: Is this the wrap you are working on?

http://www.ravelry.com/patterns/libr...ey-wrap/people

I think you may need to :frog: back a bit, to a row that you know you got right, and then continue :knitting: We've all been there, and we feel for you.

There may be something useful under "Fixing Mistakes" here.

http://www.knittinghelp.com/videos/knitting-tips

Hope this helps, feel free to ask for help anytime.

salmonmac 07-09-2013 05:36 AM

It looks like you dropped stitch is in an area of maybe stockinette and reverse stockinette stitch (possibly some seed stitch?). You're going to have to change the way you pick up the sts so that they follow that pattern. This aritcle may help with orienting a crochet hook (or your knitting needles if you're using them) so that the dropped stitch blends in. Don't worry about loose yarn on either side of the dropped st, that'll work its way into the fabric itself. It's worth another try or two but you may wind up having to rip back as claire suggested.

DavidSydney63 07-09-2013 07:59 AM

Don't worry - just unpick it and start again we've ALL done it. I've just found a counting error in the front of a vest I'm knitting which will mean ripping back about 12 inches on stocking stitch ... but I'm very philosophical about it ... I'd rather a perfect object than a flawed one, especially as it's a gift.

Ingrid 07-09-2013 01:18 PM

I think you'll be much happier with a frogged/reknit section than with a repaired spot, especially if you're not sure what to do. By the time you get all the stitches back in place by repairing them, you could be finished reknitting that section. Just my opinion.

GrumpyGramma 07-09-2013 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ingrid (Post 1380960)
I think you'll be much happier with a frogged/reknit section than with a repaired spot, especially if you're not sure what to do. By the time you get all the stitches back in place by repairing them, you could be finished reknitting that section. Just my opinion.

I share this opinion. I've been there, done that, I've spent too much time trying to fix it only to frog anyhow. *sigh* Still, I learned things along the way, one of which is that sometimes it's better just to frog and get it over with. I've fixed things and gone on only to realize I couldn't just leave it and frogged the additional rows as well. Some patterns and yarns help hide mistakes better than others. Check out using lifelines, they can help when you do have to frog.


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