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-   -   Any knitters with carpal tunnel and/or tennis elbow? (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=116307)

smeldsgang 01-27-2014 10:17 PM

Any knitters with carpal tunnel and/or tennis elbow?
 
I have both and they're in my dominant hand/arm, which makes it very hard for me to knit for any longer then 5 minutes at a time.

Any suggestions as what I can do to help alleviate the discomfort?

DogCatMom 01-28-2014 01:45 AM

(I'm just taking a break from work, so brief response.)

There have been several discussions along these lines in recent months; a targeted search will no doubt bring them to light. :)

Terms like "painful wrist," "painful arm," and such may help, or someone may remember exactly where the threads are.

I'm a non-surgery survivor of CTS, but it's very difficult to do what I did: I stopped all hand work, including my music, for 15 years....so I could keep working. It wasn't much fun, but at the time there weren't nearly as many options as there are now.

Woodi 01-28-2014 04:57 PM

a few years ago, I thought I had carpal tunnel; doc said not much to do for it except surgery, which I didn't want. So I rested myself - stopped knitting for a couple of months....and then taught myself different knitting techniques.
Varying my ways of holding needles and yarn, and slowing down. I used to knit as if my life depended on getting it done quickly. Now I knit slowly, rest often....and it's ok. I still get pain occasionally, but I figure that it comes with aging.
There are many ways to live with a bit of pain. Have you talked to your health provider(s) for ways? Good luck!

smeldsgang 01-28-2014 06:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Woodi (Post 1395980)
a few years ago, I thought I had carpal tunnel; doc said not much to do for it except surgery, which I didn't want. So I rested myself - stopped knitting for a couple of months....and then taught myself different knitting techniques.
Varying my ways of holding needles and yarn, and slowing down. I used to knit as if my life depended on getting it done quickly. Now I knit slowly, rest often....and it's ok. I still get pain occasionally, but I figure that it comes with aging.
There are many ways to live with a bit of pain. Have you talked to your health provider(s) for ways? Good luck!


I will take to my doctor again about it, but we have also thought if I lost some weight it may help too.

Deb7 01-29-2014 02:57 PM

I have a past history of severe carpal tunnel syndrome. The doctor told me that it was so severe, that there were not options other than surgery. He did give me a splint to sleep in that held my hand back, stretching the ligaments in my wrist, and it did help, some. I went to an alternative medicine practitioner and he did a deep tissure massage (which was painful) and he also taught me some stretches. It pretty much cured it. Now, whenever I feel a twinge of it, I do the stretches I was taught. I have not had to wear the splint in years.

Now I also have a pinched nerve in my neck from degenerating disks that sends sharp pain down to my hand. But that is a separate issure from this thread. Sorry.

Now that I'm learning to knit, I notice that I can go for HOURS, literally, and no pain in my arms. Whereas, when I crochet, my left arm will cramp up and I sometimes feel pain all the way to my neck.

My suggestion to you is to maybe try getting a deep tissue massage. They are worth the money if you can afford one. And to learn the correct stretches for your wrist. I can explain them to you, if you want. If you do choose to get a deep tissue massage, make sure you go to a reputable practitioner. It is such a deep massage, I imagine someone could do some damage if they do not know what they are doing. It really helped me. It spared me from surgery.

GrumpyGramma 01-29-2014 03:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deb7 (Post 1396045)
I have a past history of severe carpal tunnel syndrome. The doctor told me that it was so severe, that there were not options other than surgery. He did give me a splint to sleep in that held my hand back, stretching the ligaments in my wrist, and it did help, some. I went to an alternative medicine practitioner and he did a deep tissure massage (which was painful) and he also taught me some stretches. It pretty much cured it. Now, whenever I feel a twinge of it, I do the stretches I was taught. I have not had to wear the splint in years.

Now I also have a pinched nerve in my neck from degenerating disks that sends sharp pain down to my hand. But that is a separate issure from this thread. Sorry.

Now that I'm learning to knit, I notice that I can go for HOURS, literally, and no pain in my arms. Whereas, when I crochet, my left arm will cramp up and I sometimes feel pain all the way to my neck.

My suggestion to you is to maybe try getting a deep tissue massage. They are worth the money if you can afford one. And to learn the correct stretches for your wrist. I can explain them to you, if you want. If you do choose to get a deep tissue massage, make sure you go to a reputable practitioner. It is such a deep massage, I imagine someone could do some damage if they do not know what they are doing. It really helped me. It spared me from surgery.

My daughter is trained in massage and is quite skilled at deep tissue therapy. There are only a very few practitioners who she knows that she would allow to touch her for deep tissue therapy. Unless they know what they're doing it won't help, it will be painful, and in some cases could make the problem worse. The same is true for any treatment that I'm aware of. I've known people who had surgery and came out of it no better, and sometimes worse off, than they were before

Deb7 01-29-2014 03:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrumpyGramma (Post 1396047)
My daughter is trained in massage and is quite skilled at deep tissue therapy. There are only a very few practitioners who she knows that she would allow to touch her for deep tissue therapy. Unless they know what they're doing it won't help, it will be painful, and in some cases could make the problem worse. The same is true for any treatment that I'm aware of. I've known people who had surgery and came out of it no better, and sometimes worse off, than they were before

I agree. That's why I suggested to find a reputable practitioner. It is not a "feel good massage." I was very lucky at how successful it was for me. I'd do it again, in a heartbeat, if I needed to. I was just sharing what worked for me.

GrumpyGramma 01-29-2014 04:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Deb7 (Post 1396050)
I agree. That's why I suggested to find a reputable practitioner. It is not a "feel good massage." I was very lucky at how successful it was for me. I'd do it again, in a heartbeat, if I needed to. I was just sharing what worked for me.


I hope it didn't sound as if I were disagreeing with you, I wasn't. I meant to point out that all treatments come with few guarantees. A well trained massage professional can work near miracles. Physical therapists don't get the same massage training as those dedicated to massage therapy do either. Some PTs are great at it, some aren't.

Deb7 01-29-2014 04:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by GrumpyGramma (Post 1396054)
I hope it didn't sound as if I were disagreeing with you, I wasn't. I meant to point out that all treatments come with few guarantees. A well trained massage professional can work near miracles. Physical therapists don't get the same massage training as those dedicated to massage therapy do either. Some PTs are great at it, some aren't.

Don't worry! I did not think you were disagreeing with me, at all. It's important that people be careful about who does body work on them! I did not go to a physical therapist. I went to a certified massage therapist. I think the deep tissue massage (done by a qualified practicioner) is worth a try, before resorting to surgery.


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