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-   -   What to do first? Help for a total newbie! (http://www.knittinghelp.com/forum/showthread.php?t=63332)

EileenInWI 08-04-2007 10:14 AM

What to do first? Help for a total newbie!
 
I've been crocheting for over 10 years and now I want to learn to knit. Thinking back to when I first learned to crochet, I know that everything that seems hard about knitting now will become second nature eventually. But for now I need help!

I was able to learn the double cast on and single cast on from the videos. Should I learn all the other cast on methods listed, or for now just stick with these? Then I watched the video on how to do the knit stitch about 15 times and finally thought I got it. So I tried a row, looked at it, and it was just one big jumbled mess.:whoosh: So obviously I wasn't doing something right. I am trying to find someone locally who can help me, I don't know if the videos are going to cut it for me.

Anyway, I'm a bit confused as to where to go from here. Keep trying what I'm doing, any other videos on this site I can watch? Maybe I don't even know what I'm asking! I just feel lost on how to get going and I'm obsessed now about learning to knit! :hair:

Ingrid 08-04-2007 10:33 AM

You don't need to learn all the cast ons right now. Find one that you're comfortable with--the long-tail is a good all-purpose one.

There are other sites that have pictures of knitting rather than video, so you might want to try those.

http://www.learntoknit.com/instructions_kn.php3

This one was the first that popped up on google and it has illustrations. Many knitting books and magazines have illustrations on how to do basics, as well.

Hang in there--it's not rocket science.:thumbsup:

EileenInWI 08-04-2007 10:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ingrid (Post 925070)
Hang in there--it's not rocket science.:thumbsup:


LOL, thanks! Thanks for the other site. I'll just keep trying.

stirsmommy 08-04-2007 10:44 AM

Hi
When my daughter knit her first row after watching the videos it looked pretty jumbled too. She just had to work at it some and it all got to where she is very consistent. I did end up taking her to our LYS for classes I haven't knit long enought to teach her) and they were super helpful. She is one of the few kids they have come in so they are excellent with her but they are just as good with any newbie like me. Also michaels usually has classes too.

EileenInWI 08-04-2007 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stirsmommy (Post 925076)
Hi
When my daughter knit her first row after watching the videos it looked pretty jumbled too. She just had to work at it some and it all got to where she is very consistent.

I will keep working at it!

I forgot to ask - I have heard that since I know how to crochet I should learn continental knitting and not English knitting (never even heard of those terms before this week! LOL). I have no clue when I look at these other sites, or at books, which type of knitting they are teaching and I don't want to mix things up and make it harder on myself. What should I do? How do I know what method a website/book is teaching?

zkimom 08-04-2007 06:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by EileenInWI (Post 925293)
I will keep working at it!

I forgot to ask - I have heard that since I know how to crochet I should learn continental knitting and not English knitting (never even heard of those terms before this week! LOL). I have no clue when I look at these other sites, or at books, which type of knitting they are teaching and I don't want to mix things up and make it harder on myself. What should I do? How do I know what method a website/book is teaching?

I think you should experiment with both methods and see which one you are most comfortable with. Just sit in front of Amy's videos with some practice yarn and see which method feels most comfortable to you. It seems to me that the most accepted method of teaching is English (holding the yarn in the right hand and wrapping it around the needle) as opposed to continental (holding the yarn in the left hand and scooping it up with your needle.)

I have been knitting continental since I was very young and only learned to knit English in the past few months. I can see how it may be easier for many beginners to learn English more easily than continental, however since you have been crocheting and are comfortable holding the yarn in your left hand, you might find that continental is easier for you. I don't assume that is a given. Like I said, try both ways and see which way feels better to you.

Hope this helps!

Susan


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